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Open AccessArticle

What Protects Youth Residential Caregivers from Burning Out? A Longitudinal Analysis of Individual Resilience

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Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Basel, Psychiatric University Hospital Basel, Wilhelm Klein-Strasse 27, 4002 Basel, Switzerland
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University Hospital Ulm, Department for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Steinhövelstrasse 5, 89075 Ulm, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2212; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072212 (registering DOI)
Received: 29 February 2020 / Revised: 21 March 2020 / Accepted: 23 March 2020 / Published: 25 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout as a Public Health Problem and Its Approach from Prevention)
Background: Professional caregivers are exposed to multiple stressors and have high burnout rates; however, not all individuals are equally susceptible. We investigated the association between resilience and burnout in a Swiss population of professional caregivers working in youth residential care. Methods: Using a prospective longitudinal study design, participants (n = 159; 57.9% women) reported on burnout symptoms and sense of coherence (SOC), self-efficacy and self-care at four annual sampling points. The associations of individual resilience measures and sociodemographic variables, work-related and personal stressors, and burnout symptoms were assessed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were calculated to compute hazard ratios over the course of three years. Results: Higher SOC, self-efficacy and self-care were related to lower burnout symptoms in work-related and personal domains. Higher SOC and self-efficacy were reported by older caregivers and by those with children. All three resilience measures were highly correlated. A combined model analysis weakened the protective effect of self-efficacy, leaving only SOC and self-care negatively associated with burnout. Conclusion: This longitudinal analysis suggests that SOC and self-caring behaviour in particular protect against burnout. Our findings could have implications for promoting self-care practices, as well as cultivating a meaningful, comprehensible and manageable professional climate in all facets of institutional care. View Full-Text
Keywords: residential care; burnout; stress; resilience; sense of coherence; self-efficacy; self-care residential care; burnout; stress; resilience; sense of coherence; self-efficacy; self-care
MDPI and ACS Style

Kind, N.; Bürgin, D.; Fegert, J.M.; Schmid, M. What Protects Youth Residential Caregivers from Burning Out? A Longitudinal Analysis of Individual Resilience. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 2212.

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