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Open AccessArticle

Tools to Support Self-Care Monitoring at Home: Perspectives of Patients with Heart Failure

1
Centre for Patient-Centered Heart and Lung Research, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Building 63, Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway
2
Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway
3
Campus Lovisenberg, Lovisenberg Diaconal University College, 0456 Oslo, Norway
4
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden
5
Department of Cardiology, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8916; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238916
Received: 27 September 2020 / Revised: 4 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 30 November 2020
Self-care monitoring at home can be a challenge for patients with heart failure (HF). Tools that leverage information and communication technology (ICT), comprise medical devices, or have written material may support their efforts at home. The aim of this study was to describe HF patients’ experiences and their prioritization of tools that support, or could support, self-care monitoring at home. A descriptive qualitative design employing semi-structured interviews was used with HF patients living at home and attending an HF outpatient clinic in Norway. We used a deductive analysis approach, using the concept of self-care monitoring with ICT tools, paper-based tools, medical devices, and tools to consult with healthcare professionals (HCPs) as the categorization matrix. Nineteen HF patients with a mean age of 64 years participated. ICT tools are used by individual participants to identify changes in their HF symptoms, but are not available by healthcare services. Paper-based tools, medical devices, and face-to-face consultation with healthcare professionals are traditional tools that are available and used by individual participants. HF patients use traditional and ICT tools to support recognizing, identifying, and responding to HF symptoms at home, suggesting that they could be used if they are available and supplemented by in-person consultation with HCPs. View Full-Text
Keywords: heart failure; self-care; telemedicine; eHealth; mHealth; information and communication technology (ICT) heart failure; self-care; telemedicine; eHealth; mHealth; information and communication technology (ICT)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aamodt, I.T.; Strömberg, A.; Hellesø, R.; Jaarsma, T.; Lie, I. Tools to Support Self-Care Monitoring at Home: Perspectives of Patients with Heart Failure. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8916. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238916

AMA Style

Aamodt IT, Strömberg A, Hellesø R, Jaarsma T, Lie I. Tools to Support Self-Care Monitoring at Home: Perspectives of Patients with Heart Failure. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(23):8916. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238916

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aamodt, Ina T.; Strömberg, Anna; Hellesø, Ragnhild; Jaarsma, Tiny; Lie, Irene. 2020. "Tools to Support Self-Care Monitoring at Home: Perspectives of Patients with Heart Failure" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 23: 8916. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238916

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