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Open AccessArticle

Effects of Task-Specific and Strength Training on Simulated Military Task Performance in Soldiers

1
Finnish Defence Research Agency, Finnish Defence Forces, P.O. Box 5, 04401 Järvenpää, Finland
2
Biology of Physical Activity, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä, Finland
3
National Defence University, Finnish Defence Forces, P.O. Box 7, 00861 Helsinki, Finland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8000; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218000
Received: 21 September 2020 / Revised: 26 October 2020 / Accepted: 29 October 2020 / Published: 30 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Testing and Physical Conditioning for Tactical Populations)
A soldier’s occupational physical task requirements are diverse and varied. However, the type of physical training that most effectively improves soldiers’ occupational task requirements has not been studied previously. The purpose of this study was to determine the important strength characteristics for soldiers during a repeated simulated military task course, and the type of training that may be effective to improve these abilities during a specialized military training period. Forty-two (n = 42) soldiers participated in the study. They were divided into three training groups; a soldier task-specific training group (TSG, n = 17), a strength training group (STG, n = 15), and a control group (CON, n = 10). Participants were measured before (PRE), middle (MID) and after (POST) the 12-week training intervention for strength performance and simulated military task test. Simulated military task performance improved significantly in TSG and STG between the PRE and MID measurements (from 9.4 to 15.7%). TSG and STG improved in various spilt times, especially in strength tasks; casualty drag (from 8.3 to 13.6%) and kettlebell carry (from 13.2 to 22.4%) between the PRE and MID measurements. The present study showed that both the training of TSG and STG were more effective than the training of CON (control group) in terms of improving the performance in the repeated simulated military task course. The present study showed that training of TSG was as effective as STG to improve repeated simulated military task course time. Therefore, an optimal training combination should include high-intensity simulated military task field training and strength training programmed with consideration of the military training phase and environmental possibilities. View Full-Text
Keywords: neuromuscular performance; strength training; task-specific; occupational test; military; soldier neuromuscular performance; strength training; task-specific; occupational test; military; soldier
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ojanen, T.; Häkkinen, K.; Hanhikoski, J.; Kyröläinen, H. Effects of Task-Specific and Strength Training on Simulated Military Task Performance in Soldiers. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 8000. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218000

AMA Style

Ojanen T, Häkkinen K, Hanhikoski J, Kyröläinen H. Effects of Task-Specific and Strength Training on Simulated Military Task Performance in Soldiers. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(21):8000. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218000

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ojanen, Tommi; Häkkinen, Keijo; Hanhikoski, Jaakko; Kyröläinen, Heikki. 2020. "Effects of Task-Specific and Strength Training on Simulated Military Task Performance in Soldiers" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 21: 8000. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218000

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