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Article

Psychological Climate for Caring and Work Outcomes: A Virtuous Cycle

1
Sustainability and Health Initiative (SHINE), Department of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
2
Manaus, LLC, Los Angeles, CA 91436, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7035; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197035
Received: 13 July 2020 / Revised: 16 September 2020 / Accepted: 22 September 2020 / Published: 25 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges in Positive Organizational Psychology)
The current literature’s focus on unidirectional effects of psychological and organizational climates at work on work outcomes fails to capture the full relationship between these factors. This article examines whether a psychological climate for caring contributes to specific work outcomes and investigates whether work outcomes support the climate for caring, creating a feedback loop. Results confirm a bi-directional, temporal association between perceived climate for caring and two of the four explored work outcomes: self-reported productivity and self-reported work quality. The effect of a perceived caring climate on these work outcomes was stronger than the effect in the opposite direction. The perception that the work climate was caring was also found to affect work engagement, but the reverse relationship was not identified. We did not find any evidence for a link between job satisfaction and a climate for caring at work in either direction. View Full-Text
Keywords: psychological climate; climate for caring; job satisfaction; work engagement; self-reported work outcomes psychological climate; climate for caring; job satisfaction; work engagement; self-reported work outcomes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Weziak-Bialowolska, D.; Bialowolski, P.; Leon, C.; Koosed, T.; McNeely, E. Psychological Climate for Caring and Work Outcomes: A Virtuous Cycle. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7035. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197035

AMA Style

Weziak-Bialowolska D, Bialowolski P, Leon C, Koosed T, McNeely E. Psychological Climate for Caring and Work Outcomes: A Virtuous Cycle. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(19):7035. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197035

Chicago/Turabian Style

Weziak-Bialowolska, Dorota; Bialowolski, Piotr; Leon, Carlued; Koosed, Tamar; McNeely, Eileen. 2020. "Psychological Climate for Caring and Work Outcomes: A Virtuous Cycle" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 19: 7035. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17197035

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