Next Article in Journal
Frailty Status and Transport Disadvantage: Comparison of Older Adults’ Travel Behaviours between Metropolitan, Suburban, and Rural Areas of Japan
Next Article in Special Issue
What Do the Managers Think of Us? The Older-Worker-Perspective of Managers’ Attitudes
Previous Article in Journal
Similarities between the Effects of Prenatal Chlorpyrifos and Valproic Acid on Ultrasonic Vocalization in Infant Wistar Rats
Previous Article in Special Issue
Barriers and Willingness to Accept Re-Employment among Unemployed Senior Workers: The SeniorWorkingLife Study
 
 
Article

Occupational Exposures Associated with Life Expectancy without and with Disability

1
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, 6500 Nijmegen, The Netherlands
2
Coronel Institute of Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1081 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, VU University Amsterdam, 1081 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, VU University Amsterdam, 1081 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6377; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176377
Received: 18 July 2020 / Revised: 25 August 2020 / Accepted: 28 August 2020 / Published: 1 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prolonging Working Life among Senior Workers)
Policies to extend working lives often do not take into account potentially important health inequalities arising from differences in occupational exposures. Little is known about which occupational exposures are associated with these inequalities. This study aims to examine differences in life expectancy without and with disability by occupational exposures. Longitudinal data (1992–2016) on disability and physical and psychosocial work demands and resources of 2513 (former) workers aged ≥55 years participating in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were used. Gender specific life expectancies without and with disability by occupational exposures were calculated using multistate survival models. Women aged 55 years with high physical work demands had a lower life expectancy without disability than those with low exposure (1.02–1.57 years), whereas there was no difference for men. Men and women with high psychosocial work demands and resources had a longer life expectancy without disability than those with low exposure (1.19–2.14 years). Life expectancy with disability did not significantly differ across occupational exposures. Workers with higher psychosocial demands and resources and lower physical demands can expect to live more disability-free years. Information on occupational exposure helps to identify workers at risk for lower life expectancy, especially without disability, who may need specific support regarding their work environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthy life expectancy; disability; occupational exposure; ageing; gender healthy life expectancy; disability; occupational exposure; ageing; gender
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

de Wind, A.; Sewdas, R.; Hoogendijk, E.O.; van der Beek, A.J.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Boot, C.R.L. Occupational Exposures Associated with Life Expectancy without and with Disability. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6377. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176377

AMA Style

de Wind A, Sewdas R, Hoogendijk EO, van der Beek AJ, Deeg DJH, Boot CRL. Occupational Exposures Associated with Life Expectancy without and with Disability. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6377. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176377

Chicago/Turabian Style

de Wind, Astrid, Ranu Sewdas, Emiel O. Hoogendijk, Allard J. van der Beek, Dorly J. H. Deeg, and Cécile R. L. Boot. 2020. "Occupational Exposures Associated with Life Expectancy without and with Disability" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 17: 6377. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176377

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop