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Open AccessArticle

Passive Exposure to Pollutants from a New Generation of Cigarettes in Real Life Scenarios

1
Center for Nuclear Sciences and Technologies (C2TN), Instituto Superior Técnico, University of Lisbon, Estrada Nacional 10, 2695-066 Bobadela-LRS, Portugal
2
Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM), University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3455; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103455
Received: 18 April 2020 / Revised: 6 May 2020 / Accepted: 13 May 2020 / Published: 15 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated human exposure to air pollution)
The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and heat-not-burn tobacco (HNBT), as popular nicotine delivery systems (NDS), has increased among adult demographics. This study aims to assess the effects on indoor air quality of traditional tobacco cigarettes (TCs) and new smoking alternatives, to determine the differences between their potential impacts on human health. Measurements of particulate matter (PM1, PM2.5 and PM10), black carbon, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were performed in two real life scenarios, in the home and in the car. The results indicated that the particle emissions from the different NDS devices were significantly different. In the home and car, the use of TCs resulted in higher PM10 and ultrafine particle concentrations than when e-cigarettes were smoked, while the lowest concentrations were associated with HNBT. As black carbon and CO are released by combustion processes, the concentrations of these two pollutants were significantly lower for e-cigarettes and HNBT because no combustion occurs when they are smoked. CO2 showed no increase directly associated with the NDS but a trend linked to a higher respiration rate connected with smoking. The results showed that although the levels of pollutants emitted by e-cigarettes and HNBT are substantially lower compared to those from TCs, the new smoking devices are still a source of indoor air pollutants. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor air quality; e-cigarettes; heat-not-burn tobacco; traditional smoking products; tobacco smoke; passenger cars indoor air quality; e-cigarettes; heat-not-burn tobacco; traditional smoking products; tobacco smoke; passenger cars
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Savdie, J.; Canha, N.; Buitrago, N.; Almeida, S.M. Passive Exposure to Pollutants from a New Generation of Cigarettes in Real Life Scenarios. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3455.

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