Next Article in Journal
Differences in Eysenck’s Personality Dimensions between a Group of Breast Cancer Survivors and the General Population
Next Article in Special Issue
Development of a Hydrologic and Water Allocation Model to Assess Water Availability in the Sabor River Basin (Portugal)
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Religion in Buffering the Impact of Stressful Life Events on Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Depressive Episodes or Adjustment Disorder
Previous Article in Special Issue
Optimum Matching Model Using Long-Term Computing on Safer Rural Domestic Water Supply Based on Rainwater Harvesting
Open AccessArticle

The Potential of Small Dams for Conjunctive Water Management in Rural Municipalities

1
Department of Geology, Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro University, Quinta de Prados, Ap. 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
2
Centro de Investigação e Tecnologias Agroambientais e Biológicas, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Ap 1013, 5001–801 Vila Real, Portugal
3
Vila Pouca de Aguiar Town Hall, 5450 Vila Pouca de Aguiar, Portugal
4
Centro de Química de Vila Real, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Ap 1013, 5001–801 Vila Real, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1239; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071239
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 5 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Allocation of Rainwater Harvesting Sites in Catchments)
The drinking water supply to Vila Pouca de Aguiar municipality in North Portugal is based on high quality groundwater, namely on nearly one hundred artesian springs and fifty boreholes. The groundwater resources are plentiful on a municipal level, but evidence some deficits at the sub-municipal (village) level, especially during the dry period (July- August) that coincides with the return of many emigrants for holiday time. The deficits affect mostly the municipal capital (Vila Pouca de Aguiar) and a neighboring village (Pedras Salgadas), which populations nearly double or even triple during that period. The estimated annual deficits approach 55,000 m3/yr in those villages. If the anticipated increase in consumption/habitant and decrease in annual rainfall become reality in the next two decades, then the deficits may raise to approximately 90,000 m3/yr. To balance the water supply system, this study proposes its transition towards a conjunctive water management based on surface water stored in small dams and groundwater. A hydrologic modeling involving small forested catchments (< 15 km2) elected the Cabouço watershed as most suited basin to store stream water, because surface water availability is large (2.4 Mm3/yr) and forest cover is dominant (84.8%). Estimated nutrient loads are also compatible with drinking water supply. View Full-Text
Keywords: groundwater; surface water; small dams; conjunctive water management; hydrologic modeling; geographic information system; municipality; drinking water supply; forest; water shortage; water stress groundwater; surface water; small dams; conjunctive water management; hydrologic modeling; geographic information system; municipality; drinking water supply; forest; water shortage; water stress
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Soares, S.; Terêncio, D.; Fernandes, L.; Machado, J.; Pacheco, F.A.L. The Potential of Small Dams for Conjunctive Water Management in Rural Municipalities. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071239

AMA Style

Soares S, Terêncio D, Fernandes L, Machado J, Pacheco FAL. The Potential of Small Dams for Conjunctive Water Management in Rural Municipalities. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(7):1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071239

Chicago/Turabian Style

Soares, Sara; Terêncio, Daniela; Fernandes, Luís; Machado, João; Pacheco, Fernando A.L. 2019. "The Potential of Small Dams for Conjunctive Water Management in Rural Municipalities" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 7: 1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071239

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop