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Open AccessArticle

Maternal Exposure to Particulate Matter during Pregnancy and Adverse Birth Outcomes in the Republic of Korea

1
Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul 02447, Korea
2
Central Hospice Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 10408, Korea
3
Division of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 03080, Korea
5
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Korea
6
Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul 05278, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(4), 633; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040633
Received: 22 January 2019 / Revised: 12 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 21 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Air Pollution Impact on Children’s Health)
Air pollution has become a global concern due to its association with numerous health effects. We aimed to assess associations between birth outcomes in Korea, such as preterm births and birth weight in term infants, and particulate matter < 10 µm (PM10). Records from 1,742,183 single births in 2010–2013 were evaluated. Mean PM10 concentrations during pregnancy were calculated and matched to birth data by registered regions. We analyzed the frequency of birth outcomes between groups using WHO criteria for PM10 concentrations with effect sizes estimated using multivariate logistic regression. Women exposed to PM10 > 70 µg/m3 during pregnancy had a higher rate of preterm births than women exposed to PM10 ≤ 70 µg/m3 (7.4% vs. 4.7%, P < 0.001; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.570; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.487–1.656). The rate of low birth weight in term infants increased when women were exposed to PM10 > 70 µg/m3 (1.9% vs. 1.7%, P = 0.278), but this difference was not statistically significant (aOR 1.060, 95% CI: 0.953–1.178). In conclusion, PM10 exposure > 70 µg/m3 was associated with preterm births. Further studies are needed to explore the pathophysiologic mechanisms and guide policy development to prevent future adverse effects on birth outcomes. View Full-Text
Keywords: maternal exposure; particulate matter; preterm birth maternal exposure; particulate matter; preterm birth
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, Y.J.; Song, I.G.; Kim, K.-N.; Kim, M.S.; Chung, S.-H.; Choi, Y.-S.; Bae, C.-W. Maternal Exposure to Particulate Matter during Pregnancy and Adverse Birth Outcomes in the Republic of Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 633. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040633

AMA Style

Kim YJ, Song IG, Kim K-N, Kim MS, Chung S-H, Choi Y-S, Bae C-W. Maternal Exposure to Particulate Matter during Pregnancy and Adverse Birth Outcomes in the Republic of Korea. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(4):633. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040633

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Yu J.; Song, In G.; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Min S.; Chung, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Yong-Sung; Bae, Chong-Woo. 2019. "Maternal Exposure to Particulate Matter during Pregnancy and Adverse Birth Outcomes in the Republic of Korea" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 4: 633. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040633

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