Next Article in Journal
Understanding the Hierarchical Relationships in Female Sex Workers’ Social Networks Based on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice
Previous Article in Journal
Randomized Controlled Trial on Effects of a Brief Clinical-Based Intervention Involving Planning Strategy on Self-Care Behaviors in Periodontal Patients in Dental Practice
Previous Article in Special Issue
Impact of Carers’ Smoking Status on Childhood Obesity in the Growing up in Ireland Cohort Study
Open AccessReview

What Is the Relationship between the Neighbourhood Built Environment and Time Spent in Outdoor Play? A Systematic Review

1
Intern Architect, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2, Canada
2
Human Early Learning Partnership, University of British Columbia, Suite 440, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada
3
School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, University of British Columbia, 379-2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
4
Department of Pediatrics, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, British Columbia Children’s Hospital Research Institute, British Columbia Injury Research & Prevention Unit, F511-4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3840; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203840
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 1 October 2019 / Accepted: 2 October 2019 / Published: 11 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Factors, Children’s Health and Safety)
Outdoor play has been associated with children’s and adolescents’ healthy development and physical activity. Attributes of the neighbourhood built environment can influence play behaviours. This systematic review examined the relationship between attributes of the neighbourhood built environment and the time children and adolescents (0–18 years) spend in self-directed outdoor play. We identified and evaluated 18 relevant papers using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and developed a narrative synthesis of study results. We found moderate evidence that lower traffic volumes (ages 6–11), yard access (ages 3–10), and increased neighbourhood greenness (ages 2–15) were positively associated with time spent in outdoor play, as well as limited evidence that specific traffic-calming street features such as fewer intersections, low traffic speeds, neighbourhood disorder, and low residential density were positively associated with time spent in outdoor play. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review on this topic. The limited number of “good quality” studies identified highlights the need for additional research on the topic. View Full-Text
Keywords: unstructured play; playability; child; adolescent; neighbourhood design unstructured play; playability; child; adolescent; neighbourhood design
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lambert, A.; Vlaar, J.; Herrington, S.; Brussoni, M. What Is the Relationship between the Neighbourhood Built Environment and Time Spent in Outdoor Play? A Systematic Review. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3840.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop