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Open AccessArticle

Recreational Centres’ Facilities and Activities to Support Healthy Ageing in Singapore

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School of Public Health, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Australia
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Collaboration for Evidence, Research and Impact in Public Health, (CERIPH), School of Public Health, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6845, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3343; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183343
Received: 20 August 2019 / Revised: 3 September 2019 / Accepted: 5 September 2019 / Published: 10 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Aging and Public Health)
Objective: This study examined the physical and social environment (facilities and activities) of Singapore’s Recreational Centres (RCs) and female patrons’ (>50 years) perception of the RC facilities and activities. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 RCs were audited, and 22 face-to-face interviews were undertaken. Results: Physical activity classes were the main activity offered (mean = eight classes per month), with walking (29.8%) and aerobics sessions (17.5%) being the most frequent. Nutrition classes and social activities were offered less often (mean = one class per month). The activities were well received by patrons, offering opportunities to interact while participating in physical activity and nutrition classes. However, the need for staff training, consideration of patron’s abilities and the desire to engage in alternative activities were expressed. Conclusion: Overall, RCs’ facilities and activities were well liked by the patrons but opportunities for improvements were identified. Regular reviews of facilities and activities through consultation with the RC patrons and managers are needed to ensure that the facilities and activities remain relevant and practical to the patrons. This will help to support active lifestyles and healthy eating practices among older adults residing within the community.
Keywords: age-friendly; facilities; healthy eating; health behaviour; health promotion; lifestyle; physical activity; recreational centres age-friendly; facilities; healthy eating; health behaviour; health promotion; lifestyle; physical activity; recreational centres
MDPI and ACS Style

Wong, E.-S.; Lee, A.H.; James, A.P.; Jancey, J. Recreational Centres’ Facilities and Activities to Support Healthy Ageing in Singapore. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3343.

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