Next Article in Journal
China’s Air Quality and Respiratory Disease Mortality Based on the Spatial Panel Model
Next Article in Special Issue
Breaking Up Sitting with Light-Intensity Physical Activity: Implications for Shift-Workers
Previous Article in Journal
Green Space and Depression during Pregnancy: Results from the Growing Up in New Zealand Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Implementing Low-Cost, Community-Based Exercise Programs for Middle-Aged and Older Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: What Are the Benefits for Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk?
Article

Mothers’ Perceived Neighbourhood Environment and Outdoor Play of 2- to 3.5-Year-Old Children: Findings from the Healthy Beginnings Trial

1
Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
Health Promotion Unit, Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia
3
School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China
4
Prevention Research Collaboration, Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(9), 1082; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091082
Received: 2 August 2017 / Revised: 12 September 2017 / Accepted: 15 September 2017 / Published: 18 September 2017
Background: This study aims to investigate whether mothers’ perceived neighbourhood environment is associated with outdoor playtime of 2- to 3.5-year-old children. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses were conducted using data from the Healthy Beginnings Trial (HBT). Data on children’s outdoor playtime and mothers’ perceived neighbourhood environment were collected through face-to-face interviews with mothers when their children were 2 and 3.5 years old. Walk score was obtained from a publicly available website and population density data were obtained from Australian Census data. Multiple logistic regression models were built to investigate these associations. Results: A total of 497 and 415 mother-child dyads were retained at 2 years and 3.5 years. After adjusting for intervention group allocation and other confounding factors, at 2 years, mothers’ perceptions that ‘the neighbourhood is a good place to bring up children’, ‘it is safe to play outside during the day’, and ‘there are good parks or playgrounds in neighbourhood’ were positively associated with children’s outdoor playtime. At 3.5 years, living in a free-standing house was associated with more children’s outdoor playtime. Conclusions: Children may benefit from living in a neighbourhood that supports active lifestyle. Improving social and physical environments in neighbourhoods could be an important strategy for improving young children’s physical activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: neighbourhood environment; outdoor play; physical activity; young children; perceptions neighbourhood environment; outdoor play; physical activity; young children; perceptions
MDPI and ACS Style

Xu, H.; Wen, L.M.; Hardy, L.L.; Rissel, C. Mothers’ Perceived Neighbourhood Environment and Outdoor Play of 2- to 3.5-Year-Old Children: Findings from the Healthy Beginnings Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1082. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091082

AMA Style

Xu H, Wen LM, Hardy LL, Rissel C. Mothers’ Perceived Neighbourhood Environment and Outdoor Play of 2- to 3.5-Year-Old Children: Findings from the Healthy Beginnings Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(9):1082. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091082

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xu, Huilan, Li M. Wen, Louise L. Hardy, and Chris Rissel. 2017. "Mothers’ Perceived Neighbourhood Environment and Outdoor Play of 2- to 3.5-Year-Old Children: Findings from the Healthy Beginnings Trial" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14, no. 9: 1082. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14091082

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop