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Carrageenans from the Red Seaweed Sarconema filiforme Attenuate Symptoms of Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats

1
Functional Foods Research Group, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia
2
School of Health and Wellbeing, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD 4350, Australia
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School of Science and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, QLD 4558, Australia
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Southern Cross Plant Science, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia
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Centre for Marine Science and Innovation, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
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School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD 4701, Australia.
Current address: School of Science, Western Sydney University, Richmond, NSW 2753, Australia.
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(2), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18020097
Received: 24 December 2019 / Revised: 24 January 2020 / Accepted: 27 January 2020 / Published: 31 January 2020
Carrageenans are thickening and gelling agents that may provide health benefits. Iota (ι)-carrageenan, a linear sulfated polysaccharide, is produced by the red seaweed, Sarconema filiforme. This study investigated the potential of this seaweed as a functional food for the reversal of metabolic syndrome and possible mechanisms. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups in a 16-week protocol: corn starch diet-fed rats (C); C rats supplemented with 5% S. filiforme for the last 8 weeks (CSF); high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats (H); and H rats supplemented with 5% S. filiforme for the last 8 weeks (HSF). S. filiforme was produced in tank-based aquaculture yielding 27 g dry weight/day/m2 of culture area. H rats developed obesity, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, glucose intolerance, fatty liver and increased left ventricular collagen deposition. S. filiforme supplementation decreased body weight, abdominal and liver fat, systolic blood pressure, plasma total cholesterol concentrations, and plasma activities of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase. S. filiforme supplementation modulated gut microbiota without changing the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio. S. filiforme improved symptoms of high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Possible mechanisms include a reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells into organs as well as prebiotic actions in the gastrointestinal tract. View Full-Text
Keywords: algae; Sarconema filiforme; sulfated polysaccharides; ι-carrageenan; prebiotics; gut microbiota; aquaculture; nutraceutical algae; Sarconema filiforme; sulfated polysaccharides; ι-carrageenan; prebiotics; gut microbiota; aquaculture; nutraceutical
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du Preez, R.; Paul, N.; Mouatt, P.; Majzoub, M.E.; Thomas, T.; Panchal, S.K.; Brown, L. Carrageenans from the Red Seaweed Sarconema filiforme Attenuate Symptoms of Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats. Mar. Drugs 2020, 18, 97.

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