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Letter

Using Geiger Dosimetry EKO-C Device to Detect Ionizing Radiation Emissions from Building Materials

Faculty of Production and Power Engineering, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Mickiewicza Av. 21, 31-120 Krakow, Poland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2021, 21(2), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/s21020645
Received: 1 December 2020 / Revised: 4 January 2021 / Accepted: 11 January 2021 / Published: 18 January 2021
The purpose of the article is to check and assess what radiation is emitted by particular building materials with the passage of time. The analysis was performed with the EKO-C dosimetry device from Polon-Ekolab. The scope of the work included research on sixteen selected construction materials, divided into five groups. The analysis of the results showed that samples such as bricks (first group) and hollow blocks (second group) emit the highest radiation in the tested objects. When comparing these materials, the highest value was recorded when measuring the ceramic block of 15.76 mSv·yr−1. Taking into account the bricks, the highest value of radiation was shown by a full clinker brick, 11.3 mSv·yr−1. Insulation materials and finishing boards are two other groups of building materials that have been measured. They are characterised by a low level of radiation. In the case of materials for thermal insulation, the highest condition was demonstrated by graphite polystyrene of 4.463 mSv·yr−1, while among finishing boards, the highest value of radiation was recorded for the measurement of gypsum board of 3.76 mSv·yr−1. Comparing the obtained test results to the requirements of the Regulation of the Council of Ministers on ionizing radiation dose limits applicable in Poland, it can be noted that the samples examined individually do not pose a radiation risk to humans. When working with all types of samples, the radiation doses are added up. According to the guidelines of the regulation, the total radiation dose does not exceed 50 mSv·yr−1 and does not constitute a threat to human health. View Full-Text
Keywords: materials; radiation; dosimetry materials; radiation; dosimetry
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gliniak, M.; Dróżdż, T.; Kurpaska, S.; Lis, A. Using Geiger Dosimetry EKO-C Device to Detect Ionizing Radiation Emissions from Building Materials. Sensors 2021, 21, 645. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21020645

AMA Style

Gliniak M, Dróżdż T, Kurpaska S, Lis A. Using Geiger Dosimetry EKO-C Device to Detect Ionizing Radiation Emissions from Building Materials. Sensors. 2021; 21(2):645. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21020645

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gliniak, Maciej, Tomasz Dróżdż, Sławomir Kurpaska, and Anna Lis. 2021. "Using Geiger Dosimetry EKO-C Device to Detect Ionizing Radiation Emissions from Building Materials" Sensors 21, no. 2: 645. https://doi.org/10.3390/s21020645

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