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Sensors, Volume 1, Issue 3 (August 2001) – 2 articles , Pages 75-101

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Article
An Optical Biosensor for Monitoring Antigen Recognition Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance Using Avidin-Biotin System
Sensors 2001, 1(3), 91-101; https://doi.org/10.3390/s10300091 - 12 Aug 2001
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 8112
Abstract
A novel optical biosensor based on simultaneous multiwave length detection surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been developed for immunosensing. The sensor is designed on the basis of fixing angle of incidence and measuring the reflected intensities of light in the wavelength range of [...] Read more.
A novel optical biosensor based on simultaneous multiwave length detection surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has been developed for immunosensing. The sensor is designed on the basis of fixing angle of incidence and measuring the reflected intensities of light in the wavelength range of 400–800 nm. The SPR spectra are shown in terms of reflected light intensity verus wavelength of incident light. The intensity of the reflected light is the minimum at the resonant wavelength. The biorecognition surface, formed on a chemically modified gold layer, consists of avidin that is specifically bound with biotin. These sensing membranes were self-assembled on gold layer. The processes of sensing monolayer formation were studied in real time through observing the change of resonant wavelength. The modified surface was used as a model immunosensor and to detect successfully the human factor B (Bf). The Bf was determined in the concentration range of 0.5~100 μg/mL. Under optimum experimental conditions, the sensor has a good repeatability, reversibility and selectivity. Full article
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Review
Electrochemical Metal Ion Sensors. Exploiting Amino Acids and Peptides as Recognition Elements
Sensors 2001, 1(3), 75-90; https://doi.org/10.3390/s10300075 - 08 Aug 2001
Cited by 119 | Viewed by 10831
Abstract
Amino acids and peptides are known to bind metal ions, in some cases very strongly. There are only a few examples of exploiting this binding in sensors. The review covers the current literature on the interaction of peptides and metals and the electrochemistry [...] Read more.
Amino acids and peptides are known to bind metal ions, in some cases very strongly. There are only a few examples of exploiting this binding in sensors. The review covers the current literature on the interaction of peptides and metals and the electrochemistry of bound metal ions. Peptides may be covalently attached to surfaces. Of particular interest is the attachment to gold via sulfur linkages. Sulfur-containing peptides (eg cysteine) may be adsorbed directly, while any amino group can be covalently attached to a carboxylic acid-terminated thiol. Once at a surface, the possibility for using the attached peptide as a sensor for metal ions becomes realised. Results from the authors’ laboratory and elsewhere have shown the potential for selective monitoring of metal ions at ppt levels. Examples of the use of poly-aspartic acid and the copper binding peptide Gly-Gly-His for detecting copper ions are given. Full article
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