Next Article in Journal
Diversity and Conservation of Cave-Dwelling Bats in the Brunca Region of Costa Rica
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Habitat Structure, Plant Cover, and Successional Stage on the Bat Assemblage of a Tropical Dry Forest at Different Spatial Scales
Article Menu
Issue 2 (June) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020042

Estimating Fish Species Richness across Multiple Watersheds

Environmental Sciences & Biotechnology, Savannah River National Laboratory, 999-W, Aiken, SC 29802, USA
Received: 21 March 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 29 May 2018 / Published: 1 June 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [1962 KB, uploaded 1 June 2018]   |  

Abstract

Assessing fish species richness at the scale of an entire watershed or multiple watersheds is important when designing conservation areas and maintaining aquatic biodiversity. Estimating biodiversity at this scale requires considering the effects of habitat heterogeneity within and across drainages on the species-area relationship (SAR). I examined the SAR using unusually complete data to assess fish species richness in minimally disturbed watersheds on large public lands in the Sand Hills ecoregion, southeastern United States of America (USA). My objectives were to compare (1) true richness with estimates produced by different species richness estimators and sampling designs and (2) species richness among reservations. Accurate estimates were obtained for five contiguous watersheds (780 km2 total) by using Chao 2 or first-order jackknife estimators, coupled with (1) a stratified design that apportioned sampling effort over 25 sample sites based on major spatial correlates of assemblage composition, including stream size and drainage basin identity and (2) sufficient sampling effort to collect enough individuals to include rare species. The greatest species richness was in streams within a large land holding characterized by greater instream habitat diversity, less disturbed land coverage, more forested land, and closer proximity to source pools than other reservations. Species richness in these streams was within the range observed in high diversity Neotropical and Indomalayan realms. View Full-Text
Keywords: stream fish; species richness; drainage basins; species-area relationship; species richness estimators; sampling effort; sampling design; Sand Hills ecoregion; USA stream fish; species richness; drainage basins; species-area relationship; species richness estimators; sampling effort; sampling design; Sand Hills ecoregion; USA
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Paller, M.H. Estimating Fish Species Richness across Multiple Watersheds. Diversity 2018, 10, 42.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Diversity EISSN 1424-2818 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top