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Review

Review: Ischemia Reperfusion Injury—A Translational Perspective in Organ Transplantation

1
Immunology, Universitary Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla- Research Institute IDIVAL Santander, 390008 Santander, Spain
2
Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
3
Immunología de Trasplantes, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28220 Majadahonda (Madrid), Spain
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA
5
Red de Investigación Renal (REDINREN), 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(22), 8549; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21228549
Received: 30 September 2020 / Revised: 10 November 2020 / Accepted: 11 November 2020 / Published: 13 November 2020
Thanks to the development of new, more potent and selective immunosuppressive drugs together with advances in surgical techniques, organ transplantation has emerged from an experimental surgery over fifty years ago to being the treatment of choice for many end-stage organ diseases, with over 139,000 organ transplants performed worldwide in 2019. Inherent to the transplantation procedure is the fact that the donor organ is subjected to blood flow cessation and ischemia during harvesting, which is followed by preservation and reperfusion of the organ once transplanted into the recipient. Consequently, ischemia/reperfusion induces a significant injury to the graft with activation of the immune response in the recipient and deleterious effect on the graft. The purpose of this review is to discuss and shed new light on the pathways involved in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) that act at different stages during the donation process, surgery, and immediate post-transplant period. Here, we present strategies that combine various treatments targeted at different mechanistic pathways during several time points to prevent graft loss secondary to the inflammation caused by IRI. View Full-Text
Keywords: ischemia reperfusion injury; cell metabolism; innate immunity; hypoxia; cell death; RNA interference ischemia reperfusion injury; cell metabolism; innate immunity; hypoxia; cell death; RNA interference
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fernández, A.R.; Sánchez-Tarjuelo, R.; Cravedi, P.; Ochando, J.; López-Hoyos, M. Review: Ischemia Reperfusion Injury—A Translational Perspective in Organ Transplantation. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 8549. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21228549

AMA Style

Fernández AR, Sánchez-Tarjuelo R, Cravedi P, Ochando J, López-Hoyos M. Review: Ischemia Reperfusion Injury—A Translational Perspective in Organ Transplantation. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(22):8549. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21228549

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fernández, André R., Rodrigo Sánchez-Tarjuelo, Paolo Cravedi, Jordi Ochando, and Marcos López-Hoyos. 2020. "Review: Ischemia Reperfusion Injury—A Translational Perspective in Organ Transplantation" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 22: 8549. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21228549

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