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Open AccessReview

Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment

1
Istituto Farmaceutico Candioli, 10092 Beinasco, Italy
2
Department of Drug Science and Technology, University of Turin, 10125 Turin, Italy
3
Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Turin, 10123 Turin, Italy
4
Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, University of Turin, 10125 Turin, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2018, 23(10), 2478; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23102478
Received: 24 August 2018 / Revised: 21 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 27 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Topics in (Endo)Cannabinoid Signalling)
There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that cannabinoids are beneficial for a range of clinical conditions, including pain, inflammation, epilepsy, sleep disorders, the symptoms of multiple sclerosis, anorexia, schizophrenia and other conditions. The transformation of cannabinoids from herbal preparations into highly regulated prescription drugs is therefore progressing rapidly. The development of such drugs requires well-controlled clinical trials to be carried out in order to objectively establish therapeutic efficacy, dose ranges and safety. The low oral bioavailability of cannabinoids has led to feasible methods of administration, such as the transdermal route, intranasal administration and transmucosal adsorption, being proposed. The highly lipophilic nature of cannabinoids means that they are seen as suitable candidates for advanced nanosized drug delivery systems, which can be applied via a range of routes. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategies have flourished in several therapeutic fields in recent years and numerous drugs have reached the market. This review explores the most recent developments, from preclinical to advanced clinical trials, in the cannabinoid delivery field, and focuses particularly on pain and inflammation treatment. Likely future directions are also considered and reported. View Full-Text
Keywords: cannabinoids; delivery system; pain treatment; inflammation; cannabidiol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol cannabinoids; delivery system; pain treatment; inflammation; cannabidiol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bruni, N.; Della Pepa, C.; Oliaro-Bosso, S.; Pessione, E.; Gastaldi, D.; Dosio, F. Cannabinoid Delivery Systems for Pain and Inflammation Treatment. Molecules 2018, 23, 2478.

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