Urban Wastewater Treatment and Sustainable Drainage Systems

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 11490

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Interests: environmental engineering; urban water management; wastewater treatment; drainage systems

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Guest Editor
Architecture and Civil Engineering, Water Environment Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: environmental engineering; urban water management; wastewater treatment; drainage

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Interests: environmental engineering; urban water management; wastewater and solid waste handling

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Interests: environmental engineering; urban water management; wastewater treatment; drainage systems

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Architecture and Civil Engineering, Water Environment Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden
Interests: environmental engineering; urban water management; wastewater treatment; drainage systems

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Urban Wastewater Treatment and Sustainable Drainage Systems” is a broad theme covering several specialized urban water disciplines. In the field of water management, interdisciplinary holistic approaches will become increasingly more important as population and urbanization increase, effluent standards for wastewater systems become more stringent, climate change advances, and pollution sources become more complex. Many problems are interlinked, and future solutions need to address multiple challenges of urban living simultaneously (flooding, recreation, heat waves, etc.). So far, the focus of the research community regarding sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) has been on the stormwater handling and flood mitigation capacities of these systems. Considering the more stringent future prospect, it is high time that the quantitative and the qualitative effects of SuDS on the efficiency and operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are also investigated.

Furthermore, future solutions will require contributions not only from wastewater experts but also from those working in city planning, law, regulation, etc. In order to illustrate this shift in perspective, we believe that case studies and conceptual designs will be important contributions to this Special Issue.

In particular, we welcome contributions that present solutions or case studies focusing not only on hydraulics, treatment efficiency, and SuDS’ effects on urban wastewater treatment, but also on how they produce other effects in the built environment. Contributions focusing on how solutions are perceived by residents and on decision support systems in the form of models that can be used in discussions among engineers and city planners are scarce. Our aim is to present progress in this area.

Prof. Dr. Henrik Aspegren
Prof. Dr. Lena Blom
Prof. Dr. Jes la Cour Jansen
Dr. Karin Jönsson
Prof. Dr. Ann Mattsson
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • urban wastewater treatment
  • sustainable drainage systems
  • decision support systems
  • city planning
  • holistic wastewater planning
  • conceptual water design

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 7992 KiB  
Article
Elucidation of the Mechanism of Blockage in Sewer Pipes by Fatty Acid Deposition and Suspended Solid
by Toshihiko Otsuka, Hiroshi Yamazaki, Eriko Ankyu, Tofael Ahamed, Martin Anda and Ryozo Noguchi
Water 2020, 12(8), 2291; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12082291 - 14 Aug 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3486
Abstract
The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism by which blockages occur in sewer pipes following the deposition of fat, oil, and grease (FOG) and suspended solids (SS). In this study, a simulated wastewater flow experiment was conducted to elucidate the [...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism by which blockages occur in sewer pipes following the deposition of fat, oil, and grease (FOG) and suspended solids (SS). In this study, a simulated wastewater flow experiment was conducted to elucidate the mechanism of sewer pipe blockage using lauric acid as fatty acid and florisil to simulate FOG and SS blockages, respectively. Unplasticized polyvinyl chloride pipes (ϕ = 50 mm) with a flow speed of 2 L/min and 1% inclination were used in this experiment. In “Case L & F (lauric acid florisil),” the deposition of florisil and adhesion of solids increased at the bottom of the sewer pipe over a set period. After seven days, decreases in lauric acid concentration from 1000 to 57 mg/L and in Ca2+ concentration from 18 to 0.8 mg/L were observed. FOG deposits formed solids by the saponification of lauric acid and Ca2+ from tap water. In the simulated kitchen wastewater, either lauric acid or florisil exhibited solid deposition and adhesion. Based on these findings, the blockage mechanism was elucidated to confirm FOG deposition of and SS influenced by the combination of lauric acid, Ca2+, and florisil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Wastewater Treatment and Sustainable Drainage Systems)
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10 pages, 1832 KiB  
Article
Sand Content Prediction in Urban WWTPs Using MARS
by Vanesa Mateo Pérez, José Manuel Mesa Fernández, Francisco Ortega Fernández and Henar Morán Palacios
Water 2020, 12(5), 1357; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051357 - 11 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2170
Abstract
The pre-treatment stage of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), where most of the larger waste, including sand and fat, is removed, is of great importance for the performance and durability of these plants. This work develops a model that predicts the sand content that [...] Read more.
The pre-treatment stage of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP), where most of the larger waste, including sand and fat, is removed, is of great importance for the performance and durability of these plants. This work develops a model that predicts the sand content that reaches the plant. For this purpose, data were collected from one operation year of the Villapérez Wastewater Treatment Plant located in the northeast of the city of Oviedo (Asturias, Spain) and the MARS (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines) method was used for modelling. The accuracy of the MARS model developed using the determination coefficient is R2 = 0.74 for training data and R2 = 0.70 in validation data. These results indicate that it is possible to predict trend changes in sand production as a function of input variables changes such as flow rate, pH, ammonia, etc. This will prevent the plant from possible operational problems, as actions could be taken, such as starting up more pre-treatment lines or emptying the containers, so that the arrival of the sand can be assumed without any problem. In this way, the possibility of letting sand contents over the established limits pass that could affect the following processes of the treatment plant is avoided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Wastewater Treatment and Sustainable Drainage Systems)
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18 pages, 5460 KiB  
Article
Estimation of Wastewater Discharges by Means of OpenStreetMap Data
by Jannik Schilling and Jens Tränckner
Water 2020, 12(3), 628; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12030628 - 26 Feb 2020
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 5033
Abstract
For the optimization of sewer networks and integration of water management in urban planning, estimations of wastewater discharges at a high spatial resolution are a key boundary condition. In many cases, these data are not available or, for reasons of data protection and [...] Read more.
For the optimization of sewer networks and integration of water management in urban planning, estimations of wastewater discharges at a high spatial resolution are a key boundary condition. In many cases, these data are not available or, for reasons of data protection and company secrecy, the data are not accessible for research purposes. Therefore, procedures are needed to determine the volume of wastewater with high spatial resolution, based on freely accessible data. The approach presented here uses mainly OpenStreetMap (OSM) data, combined with a dataset of the German official topographic–cartographic Information System (ATKIS), to estimate the volume of wastewater on a building level. By comparison with daily values of the dry weather inflow at pumping stations and sewage treatment plants, it is shown that the method can generate realistic results, if target inflows exceed 50 m³/d. Difficulties due to the effect of commuting and the individual use of the buildings have to be considered, as well as data-quality issues in the OSM dataset. As an application example, the generated wastewater discharges are spatially joined with land-use plans. The resulting wastewater yield factors serve as input data for decision-support tools in urban water planning or modeling tasks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Wastewater Treatment and Sustainable Drainage Systems)
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