Special Issue "Urban Drainage Systems"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fouad H. Jaber
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, Dallas, TX 75252, USA
Interests: urban hydrology; green stormwater infrastructure; stream processes
Prof. Dr. Nadim Farajalla
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Director Climate Change and Environment Program, Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs, American University of Beirut, Bliss St., Beirut 2020-1100, Lebanon
Interests: climate change; adaptation; vulnerability; resilience; water-energy-food nexus; water security; water resources management; urban/agricultural drainage
Prof. Dr. Hadi H. Jaafar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences, American University of Beirut, Bliss St., Beirut 2020-1100, Lebanon
Interests: remote sensing; GIS; hydrologic modeling; flood plain analysis
Dr. Bassel Daher
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Interests: water-energy-food nexus; sustainable development; bridging science and policy; stakeholder engagement
Prof. Dr. Rabi H. Mohtar
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA;
2. Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences, American University of Beirut, Bliss St., Beirut 2020-1100, Lebanon
Interests: water-energy-food nexus; water productivity; soil water characterization and modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increased population growth and, in many areas, uncontrolled urbanization have led to increased imperviousness in cities across the world. This has resulted in an upsurge of urban flooding and the impairment of waterbodies due to increased stormwater flow rate, peak flow, and total volumes draining into streams, lakes, and estuaries. It has also resulted in larger pollutant loads that have impaired these water bodies. Traditional urban drainage systems, built with flooding in mind, drain stormwater rapidly into surface or subsurface conduits. Alternative sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS) that integrate green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) practices can minimize flows from existing developments while controlling natural flows, thus reducing flooding and pollution and, at the same time, increasing infiltration and groundwater recharge.

The adoption of GSI approaches in urban drainage has been increasing mostly because of incentive programs or regulations. With climate change and the increasing detection of emerging contaminants in the environment, many challenges and unknowns regarding SUDS remain. The technical and cost effectiveness and physical footprint of existing GSI designs need to be assessed for their performance, with regard to their space requirements and the expected frequent occurrence of extreme events. Urban drainage systems that address the increasing water pollution from hormones and pharmaceuticals also need to be developed. Assessing the current regulations and programs that encourage cities to accept SUDS is necessary for their wider adoption internationally.

This Special Issue aims to gather scientific contributions and case studies that address the challenges faced by urban drainage networks within a changing environment. Worldwide findings on the betterment of urban drainage networks can be greatly beneficial to the increased implementation of SUDS and GSI practices.

Prof. Dr. Fouad H. Jaber
Prof. Dr. Nadim Farajalla
Prof. Dr. Hadi H. Jaafar
Dr. Bassel Daher
Prof. Dr. Rabi H. Mohtar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A 3D Reconstruction Pipeline of Urban Drainage Pipes Based on MultiviewImage Matching Using Low-Cost Panoramic Video Cameras
Water 2019, 11(10), 2101; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102101 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Urban drainage pipe networks have complex spatial contributions, andthey are now facing problems such as damage, defects, and aging. A rapid and high-precision pipe inspection strategy is thekey to ensuring thesustainable development of urban water supply and drainage system. In this paper, a [...] Read more.
Urban drainage pipe networks have complex spatial contributions, andthey are now facing problems such as damage, defects, and aging. A rapid and high-precision pipe inspection strategy is thekey to ensuring thesustainable development of urban water supply and drainage system. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction pipeline of urban drainage pipes based on multiview image matching using low-cost panoramic video cameras is proposed, which provides an innovative technical approach for pipe inspection. Firstly, we extracted frames from the panoramic video of the pipes andcorrected the geometric distortion using a spherical reprojection to obtain multiview pipe images. Second, the robust feature matching method using support lines and affine-invariant ratios isintroduced to conduct pipe image matching. Finally, the photogrammetric processing, using structure from motion (SfM) and dense reconstruction, wasintroduced to achieve the 3D modeling of drainage pipes. Several typical drainage pipes and shafts of the real scenes were taken for the 3D reconstruction experiments. Theresults show that our strategy can realize high-precision 3D reconstruction of different types of pipes, which can provide effective technical support for rapid and efficient inspection of urban pipes with broad application prospects in the daily management of sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDSs). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Drainage Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Performance of a Hydraulically Linked and Physically Decoupled Stormwater Control Measure (SCM) System with Potentially Heterogeneous Native Soil
Water 2019, 11(7), 1472; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071472 - 16 Jul 2019
Abstract
This study shows that a physically decoupled but hydraulically linked design focusing on surface infiltration components (i.e., excluding underdrain and infiltration bed systems) can be the preferred way to have a low-cost and robust stormwater control measure (SCM) system. The SCM under investigation [...] Read more.
This study shows that a physically decoupled but hydraulically linked design focusing on surface infiltration components (i.e., excluding underdrain and infiltration bed systems) can be the preferred way to have a low-cost and robust stormwater control measure (SCM) system. The SCM under investigation in Philadelphia, PA, is a green infrastructure (GI) and has a mirrored design of two sets of hydraulically linked planters. Each planter has an overflow pipe connected to an underground infiltration bed. The system showed excellent overall performance as no overflow/bypass entering the combined sewer. A large variation of saturated hydraulic conductivity was found for the planter soil, and the planter with lower saturated hydraulic conductivity created surface runoff that overflows to the next planter in line. Due to the linked design, the unexpected deviation of performance of a single planter did not affect overall system performance. The infiltration bed showed great variation in water drawdown rate at different water depth, which could be caused by the possible high heterogeneity of the native soil. The study argued that overflow systems, which handled only about 18% of runoff in this study, can be replaced by slightly larger surface area for lower building cost, lower maintenance cost, and more reliable performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Drainage Systems)
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