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Special Issue "GIS Application in Fluvial Geomorphology and Landscape Changes"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maurizio Lazzari

Italian National Research Council, Institute of Archaeological Heritage-Monuments and Sites, Tito Scalo (PZ), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: geomorphology; geoarchaeology; natural hazards and risks; geostatistics; GIS; geotourism; geosites; engineering geology; cultural landscape

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of GIS has for many years been widely applied in various disciplinary fields, serving as an important support to scientific activity and, in the planning field, to the decisional and programmatic phase. Some morphological and environmental contexts, such as the fluvial one, are particularly suitable for experimenting with new tools, as well as useful for constructing detailed geomorphological maps, also through the semi-automatic extraction of the main landforms, or for applying morpho-evolutionary models of the river landscape, to define areas at risk of flooding and built linear and areal erosion models.

The main purpose of this Special Issue is to propose a wide series of studies and research, in which the use of GIS and/or specific app are functional to the representation of geomorphology and river dynamics, linear erosion processes, ancient landscapes reshaped by the fluvial action, flooding areas, and historical anthropical changes of the river landscape and land use.

Papers with multidisciplinary study approaches will be particularly appreciated.

Dr. Maurizio Lazzari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Fluvial landscape changes, human activity, and impacts
  • Erosional and flooding processes
  • Fluvial geomorphology and GIS mapping
  • Fluvial channels adjustments
  • GIS tools and app

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Development of Pleistocene Fluvial Terraces on the Eastern Frontal Sector of the Southern Apennines Chain, Italy
Water 2019, 11(7), 1345; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11071345
Received: 13 May 2019 / Revised: 26 June 2019 / Accepted: 27 June 2019 / Published: 28 June 2019
PDF Full-text (18097 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The investigation of Pleistocene fluvial terraces in the small river valley of the Pescogrosso Stream and surrounding areas has shown a complex and positive location for the study of a fluvial catchment development. The Pescogrosso Stream is a left tributary of the Sinni [...] Read more.
The investigation of Pleistocene fluvial terraces in the small river valley of the Pescogrosso Stream and surrounding areas has shown a complex and positive location for the study of a fluvial catchment development. The Pescogrosso Stream is a left tributary of the Sinni River and is placed on the eastern front of the fold-and-thrust belt of the southern Apennine chain of Italy. Sedimentological and geomorphological analyses of eight fluvial terraced units revealed that their formation and evolution were strictly controlled by regional tectonic uplift of the Ionian arc, by climatic changes, and by sea-level variations. In particular, the Ionian sea-level oscillations, as a factor in controlling the short-term fluvial terrace development, was the main factor responsible for the three older terraces’ evolutions. Conversely, the evolution of the five younger terraces seems to have been controlled by the base-level variations of the Sinni River. Finally, the matching of much information derived from regional and local tectonics, the plot of longitudinal terrace profiles, and the application of a sequence-stratigraphic approach to fluvial depositional sequences allowed the recognition of three evolutionary stages of development in the Pescogrosso fluvial incised-valley system during Pleistocene times. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Application in Fluvial Geomorphology and Landscape Changes)
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Open AccessArticle
Testing the Prediction Ability of LEM-Derived Sedimentary Budget in an Upland Catchment of the Southern Apennines, Italy: A Source to Sink Approach
Water 2019, 11(5), 911; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11050911
Received: 10 April 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 29 April 2019 / Published: 30 April 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (25800 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Landscape evolution models (LEMs) represent one of the most promising approaches to evaluate sedimentary budget, although factors such as the high number of parameters or the difficulty evaluating the robustness of the results can represent a limitation in their application in natural landscapes. [...] Read more.
Landscape evolution models (LEMs) represent one of the most promising approaches to evaluate sedimentary budget, although factors such as the high number of parameters or the difficulty evaluating the robustness of the results can represent a limitation in their application in natural landscapes. In this paper, the Caesar–Lisflood LEM has been applied in a small catchment (i.e., about 9 km2) of southern Italy draining an artificial reservoir in order to test its ability to predict sediment flux and erosion rate. Short-term (i.e., about 20 years) estimation of the sediment volumes accumulated in the reservoir has been reconstructed by a bathymetric survey and compared to the results coming from the coeval LEM simulations. Results indicate a good accordance between LEM-based erosion volume estimations and direct sedimentation assessment, thus testifying to the high potential of such models to solve issues of sedimentary budget and short-term landscape modification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Application in Fluvial Geomorphology and Landscape Changes)
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Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Development of Pleistocene Fluvial Terraces on the Eastern Frontal Sector of the Southern Appenines Chain, Italy
Authors:
Paolo Giannandrea, Salvatore Ivo Giano, and Roberto Sulpizio
Affiliation:
Università degli Studi della Basilicata, Potenza, Italy
* Correspondence: [email protected]

Abstract: Investigation of Pleistocene fluvial terraces in the small river valley of the Pescogrosso Stream and surrounding areas have shown a complex geological and geomorphological evolution. The Pescogrosso Stream is a left tributary of the Ionian Sea flowing Sinni River and is placed on the eastern front of the fold-and-thrust belt of the southern Apennine chain of Italy. Eight fluvial depositional units are distributed on both the eastern sector of the southern Apennine chain and the Bradano Foredeep. Sedimentological and geomorphological analyses revealed that fluvial terraces formation and evolution were strictly controlled by regional tectonic uplift of the Ionian arc, by climatic changes, and by base level variations. In addition, the depositional sequences of fluvial terraces, their variations in sediment supplies, the recognition, and dating of a tephra layer, and the local tectonic uplift contributed in determining the evolutionary scenario of the studied area. The Ionian Sea level oscillation as a factor in controlling the fluvial terraces development has been described through both a detailed facies analysis of fluvial sequences and was integrated by plots of their longitudinal terrace profiles. Furthermore, the application of the sequence-stratigraphic approach to fluvial depositional sequences allowed us to reconstruct the Pleistocene evolution of the Pescogrosso incised-valley system.

Title: Short-term GIS Analysis for the Assessment of the Recent Active Channel Planform Adjustments in a Widening, Highly Altered River. The Scrivia River, NW Italy
Authors: Mandarino A., Pepe G., Maerker M. Cevasco A., Brandolini P.
Affiliation: Università degli Studi di Genova, Genoa, Italy
* Correspondence: [email protected]

Abstract: A number of Italian rivers have recently experienced a phase of active-channel widening and reactivation of morphological processes, after decades of blocked dynamics. As a consequence, serious management issues are arising and it is fundamental to characterize the active-channel current morphological evolutionary trends, in order to carry out effective and sustainable river management measures. In this research, we investigate in detail the Scrivia River planform changes occurred over the last 20 years. According to previous researches, in this period a generalized active-channel widening and some localized very intense bank retreats are registered. This study is based on a multi-temporal analysis of aerial photographs and satellite images performed in a GIS environment. Moreover, we illustrate a FOSS GIS procedure developed to compute the migration rate referred to banks. Our findings are of potentially great importance for river management and the applied GIS methods aim to represent some useful tools for land-use planning and river management, under the fluvial restoration and risk mitigation perspective.

Title: Planimetric Channel Changes and Controlling Factors Over the Past 150 years: The Case Study of the Basento River (Southern-Italy)
Authors: de Musso N. M., Capolongo D., Caldara M., Surian N., Pennetta L.
Affiliation: Università degli Studi di Bari, Bari, Italy
* Correspondence: [email protected]

Abstract: Channel changes gained over time a growing interest in relation to relevant implications for river management and restoration. In this kind of analysis, the purely qualitative approach has gradually been replaced by  quantitative approaches, aimed to reconstruct the temporal variation of parameters (e.g. channel width and depth) to investigate not only the evolutionary trend of the river, but also possible cause-effect connections. This paper investigates the planimetric dynamics of the Basento River (Basilicata Region, Italy) during the past 150 years, when the river has been heavily impacted by human activities (e-g. hydraulic interventions and gravel mining) and climate changes Channel adjustments have been analyzed by historical maps, aerial photos and geomorphological surveys. Results show that the channel underwent a strong narrowing during the twentieth century, like many rivers in Italy, with the most intense phase during the 1950s–1990s (with a percentage variation in width ranging from -30% to -80%). Pattern morphology remained almost completely unchanged, apart from a few reaches, located in the hilly area, affected by more intense modifications before the 1940s. The causes of  channel adjustments can be identified as: human disturbances (land use variation, channel interventions at reach scale, sediment mining), from  the end of the XIX century to nowadays, and  and natural factors (changes in frequency, duration and intensity of flood events) whose effects have intensified since the late 1990s.

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