Special Issue "Natural Disasters Occurrence, Reduction, and Restoration in Mountain Regions"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Su-Chin Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Soil and Water Conservation, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung City 40227, Taiwan
Interests: sediment transport; soil erosion and scour; dam breach; landslides; vegetation restoration; eco-hydrology; disaster mitigation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mountain regions are critical because of their diverse geological conditions, dynamic changes, and the multiple natural hazards that often occur. Mountains are high-risk environments that can experience a variety of natural hazards since initiated hazards often trigger secondary, cascading hazards, having a significant impact not only on the area of occurrence but often also on up- and downstream regions. High economic loss and human casualties are caused by geophysical (rockfalls, earthquakes, volcanic activities), hydrological (floods, avalanches, dammed-lake outbursts), and sediment-related hazards (landslides, driftwood, debris/mud flows, surface erosion). Under the impacts of global warming and climate change, spatiotemporal patterns of rainfall and other weather events have become more unevenly distributed, often with a more extreme magnitude and/or intensity of events. The complexity of mountain regions and the continued changes in climate and land use have made it more challenging to predict mountainous hazards and their impacts on communities. Based on the countless efforts made worldwide on natural hazards in mountain regions, tight international collaboration is strongly needed to answer questions related to causes of disasters, monitoring of hazardous phenomena, predicting disasters, and effective reduction of hazardous consequences.

Prof. Dr. Su-Chin Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • disasters caused by dammed-lake outbursts and driftwood, debris/mud flows
  • disasters caused by landslides and rockslides
  • disasters caused by seasonal floods and surface erosions
  • the relationships between natural hazards and climate change
  • strategy from natural disasters to restoration
  • stream ecosystem services and nature-based solutions
  • disaster-resilient community and rural regeneration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Extreme Droughts Change in the Mekong River Basin: A Multidisciplinary Analysis Based on Satellite Data
Water 2021, 13(19), 2682; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13192682 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 329
Abstract
This study evaluates droughts in the Mekong River Basin (MKB) based on a multidisciplinary method, mainly using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Mann–Kendall (MK) test. Precipitation data corresponding to the seasonality of the regional climate were retrieved from Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for [...] Read more.
This study evaluates droughts in the Mekong River Basin (MKB) based on a multidisciplinary method, mainly using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Mann–Kendall (MK) test. Precipitation data corresponding to the seasonality of the regional climate were retrieved from Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement from 2001 to 2020, at a monthly temporal scale and 0.1 degree spatial resolution. Drought events and their average interval, duration, and severity were determined based on Run theory. Our results revealed the most extreme drought period was in January 2014, at the time the lowest precipitation occurred. Spatial extreme drought results indicated that Zone 2 in the upstream MKB has the highest frequency of drought, with 44 events observed during 19 years, and experiences the most severe droughts, whereas Zone 24 in the downstream MKB has the most prolonged drought duration of seven months. The periods and locations of extreme drought were identified using the SPI, corresponding to historic droughts of the MKB. Furthermore, the MK test shows an increasing trend of droughts in the lower MKB and the cluster analysis identified six clusters of times series. Overall, our study provides essential findings for international and national water resource stakeholders in identifying trends of extreme drought in the MKB. Full article
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Article
Evaluation of Rainfall-Triggered Debris Flows under the Impact of Extreme Events: A Chenyulan Watershed Case Study, Taiwan
Water 2021, 13(16), 2201; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13162201 - 12 Aug 2021
Viewed by 520
Abstract
This study examined the conditions that lead to debris flows, and their association with the rainfall return period (T) and the probability of debris flow occurrence (P) in the Chenyulan watershed, central Taiwan. Several extreme events have occurred in the Chenyulan watershed in [...] Read more.
This study examined the conditions that lead to debris flows, and their association with the rainfall return period (T) and the probability of debris flow occurrence (P) in the Chenyulan watershed, central Taiwan. Several extreme events have occurred in the Chenyulan watershed in the past, including the Chi-Chi earthquake and extreme rainfall events. The T for three rainfall indexes (i.e., the maximum hourly rainfall depth (Im), the maximum 24-h rainfall amount (Rd), and RI (RI = Im× Rd)) were analyzed, and the T associated with the triggering of debris flows is presented. The P–T relationship can be determined using three indexes, Im, Rd, and RI; how it is affected and unaffected by extreme events was developed. Models for evaluating P using the three rainfall indexes were proposed and used to evaluate P between 2009 and 2020 (i.e., after the extreme rainfall event of Typhoon Morakot in 2009). The results of this study showed that the P‒T relationship, using the RI or Rd index, was reasonable for predicting the probability of debris flow occurrence. Full article
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