Special Issue "Implications of Climate Change on the Sustainable Management of the Water–Forest Nexus"

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology and Hydrogeology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Asia Khamzina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul, Korea
Interests: forest resources and agroforestry systems; environmental change; environmental impact analysis; sustainable use of natural resources
Dr. Florent Noulèkoun
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Division of Environmental Science and Ecological Engineering, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, South Korea
Interests: Forest and Agroforest Ecology; Soil Water; Land Restoration; Climate Change Impact Assessment; Forest Growth Modeling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests and trees (i.e., trees outside forests, including trees on farms and in urban environments) are important modulators of global, regional, landscape and local hydrological cycles and patterns. Climate change impacts the forest–water nexus in that, e.g., rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may enhance or supress forest growth and evapotranspiration, or extreme weather events such as floods and droughts resulting from changing rainfall and temperature patterns may alter forest structure and ecophysiology, which in turn will affect water yields. However, the role of forests and trees in alleviating or exacerbating the impacts of climate change on water resources and the implications for forest and water management have not been well elucidated. The complex dynamics of the climate–forest–water nexus calls for the refinement of both research approaches and forest management options to improve their understanding of the drivers of climate change and adapt to the impacts on forest and water resources at various scales. In this Special Issue, we welcome submissions that report on: (i) the effects of climate change and variability on the hydrological cycle in forests and tree-based land use systems (e.g., agroforestry), assessed through field measurements and/or modeling; and (2) options for the sustainable management of the forest–water nexus under changing climatic conditions. We also invite contributions that describe novel metrics, data analysis methods and advanced modeling techniques to better understand the connections between climate change, forest and water resources.

Prof. Dr. Asia Khamzina
Dr. Florent Noulèkoun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Afforestation
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Impact assessment
  • Extreme weather events
  • Forest and agroforest hydrology
  • Forest water yield
  • Forest–water modeling
  • Hydrology-oriented forest management
  • Irrigation
  • Water scarcity

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Afforestation of Degraded Croplands as a Water-Saving Option in Irrigated Region of the Aral Sea Basin
Water 2021, 13(10), 1433; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13101433 - 20 May 2021
Viewed by 608
Abstract
Climate change is likely to decrease surface water availability in Central Asia, thereby necessitating land use adaptations in irrigated regions. The introduction of trees to marginally productive croplands with shallow groundwater was suggested for irrigation water-saving and improving the land’s productivity. Considering the [...] Read more.
Climate change is likely to decrease surface water availability in Central Asia, thereby necessitating land use adaptations in irrigated regions. The introduction of trees to marginally productive croplands with shallow groundwater was suggested for irrigation water-saving and improving the land’s productivity. Considering the possible trade-offs with water availability in large-scale afforestation, our study predicted the impacts on water balance components in the lower reaches of the Amudarya River to facilitate afforestation planning using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The land-use scenarios used for modeling analysis considered the afforestation of 62% and 100% of marginally productive croplands under average and low irrigation water supply identified from historical land-use maps. The results indicate a dramatic decrease in the examined water balance components in all afforestation scenarios based largely on the reduced irrigation demand of trees compared to the main crops. Specifically, replacing current crops (mostly cotton) with trees on all marginal land (approximately 663 km2) in the study region with an average water availability would save 1037 mln m3 of gross irrigation input within the study region and lower the annual drainage discharge by 504 mln m3. These effects have a considerable potential to support irrigation water management and enhance drainage functions in adapting to future water supply limitations. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
2019–2020 Australia Fire and Its Relationship to Hydroclimatological and Vegetation Variabilities
Water 2020, 12(11), 3067; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12113067 - 02 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1215
Abstract
Wildfire is a major concern worldwide and particularly in Australia. The 2019–2020 wildfires in Australia became historically significant as they were widespread and extremely severe. Linking climate and vegetation settings to wildfires can provide insightful information for wildfire prediction, and help better understand [...] Read more.
Wildfire is a major concern worldwide and particularly in Australia. The 2019–2020 wildfires in Australia became historically significant as they were widespread and extremely severe. Linking climate and vegetation settings to wildfires can provide insightful information for wildfire prediction, and help better understand wildfires behavior in the future. The goal of this research was to examine the relationship between the recent wildfires, various hydroclimatological variables, and satellite-retrieved vegetation indices. The analyses performed here show the uniqueness of the 2019–2020 wildfires. The near-surface air temperature from December 2019 to February 2020 was about 1 °C higher than the 20-year mean, which increased the evaporative demand. The lack of precipitation before the wildfires, due to an enhanced high-pressure system over southeast Australia, prevented the soil from having enough moisture to supply the demand, and set the stage for a large amount of dry fuel that highly favored the spread of the fires. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
Isotopic Signatures as an Indicator of Long-Term Water-Use Efficiency of Haloxylon Plantations on the Dried Aral Sea Bed
Water 2020, 12(1), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12010099 - 27 Dec 2019
Viewed by 787
Abstract
The desiccation of the Aral Sea due to water withdrawal from contributing rivers has resulted in an unprecedented change in the region’s climate, from maritime to hot dry desert. Afforestation has been implemented on the desiccated seafloor—the Aralkum Desert—for stabilizing the exposed substrate. [...] Read more.
The desiccation of the Aral Sea due to water withdrawal from contributing rivers has resulted in an unprecedented change in the region’s climate, from maritime to hot dry desert. Afforestation has been implemented on the desiccated seafloor—the Aralkum Desert—for stabilizing the exposed substrate. However, studies on the long-term status of the afforested sites are limited. Here, we examined C and N isotopic signatures in Haloxylon aphyllum plantations, as indicators of time-integrated plant response to the prevalent water and salinity constraints, in northern Aralkum, Kazakhstan. Foliar 13C composition analysis in a chronosequence of H. aphyllum plantation sites (aged 1–27 years) on the sandy substrate revealed a significant trend towards higher water-use efficiency in older plantations, possibly in response to declining water availability. A lack of correlation between plant 13C signature and soil electrical conductivity suggests no history of salt stress despite the saline environment. Furthermore, 15N enrichment in plant tissue in the water-limited Aralkum ecosystem indicates the relative openness of N cycling. There was an increase in species richness and self-propagation at the plot scale, indicating successful afforestation effort. Coupled with other approaches, isotope discrimination might elucidate mechanisms underlying stress tolerance in H. aphyllum, which could support the afforestation efforts. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop