Review Papers of Urban Water Management

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Water Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 29706

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario, Trindade, Florianópolis 88040-900, SC, Brazil
Interests: stormwater harvesting; water consumption in buildings; water efficiency; rainwater use in buildings; sustainability; permeable pavements; energy efficiency; buildings; climate change
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The section “Urban Water Management” is inviting reputable researchers to submit high-quality review papers on the following topics: urban water infrastructure; urban water supply; urban drainage; urban catchment hydrology and modeling; sponge cities; storm water management; rainwater harvesting; green roofs; permeable pavement systems; urban water contamination; effects of urbanization; sustainable development; wastewater; urban wastewater reuse; flood risk management; climate change; and any other topics related to urban water management.

Prof. Dr. Enedir Ghisi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban water infrastructure
  • urban water supply
  • urban drainage
  • urban catchment hydrology and modelling
  • sponge cities
  • storm water management
  • rainwater harvesting
  • green roofs
  • permeable pavement systems
  • urban water contamination
  • effects of urbanization
  • sustainable development
  • wastewater
  • urban wastewater reuse
  • flood risk management
  • climate change

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 741 KiB  
Article
Water Quality Improvement through Rainwater Tanks: A Review and Simulation Study
by Monzur Alam Imteaz, Vassiliki Terezinha Galvão Boulomytis, Abdullah G. Yilmaz and Abdallah Shanableh
Water 2022, 14(9), 1411; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14091411 - 28 Apr 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1924
Abstract
First, this paper presents a thorough review of water quality data using a rainwater tank, categorizing the data as with and without sedimentation. Data are presented showing minimum, maximum, and mean values for the different parameters. The data measured from several sources reveal [...] Read more.
First, this paper presents a thorough review of water quality data using a rainwater tank, categorizing the data as with and without sedimentation. Data are presented showing minimum, maximum, and mean values for the different parameters. The data measured from several sources reveal that water collected from the tank is much better than the water directly collected from the roof. In addition, to analyse the phenomena through a mathematical model, a hypothetical 5 kL rainwater tank with a 200 m2 roof was modelled with the MUSIC model. The simulations were compared with the measured water quality data from a rainwater tank in Melbourne. In general, we found that MUSIC’s simulations on the mean daily concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) and total phosphorus (TP) are slight underestimations compared to the measured data from Melbourne. Further MUSIC simulations reveal that significant reductions in the daily maximum concentrations of TSS, TP, and total nitrogen (TN) are expected through a rainwater tank. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers of Urban Water Management)
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Review

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37 pages, 1073 KiB  
Review
Evaluating the Effectiveness of Bioretention Cells for Urban Stormwater Management: A Systematic Review
by Shaahin Nazarpour, Ilaria Gnecco and Anna Palla
Water 2023, 15(5), 913; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15050913 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6430
Abstract
Bioretention cells (BRCs) are a promising low-impact development (LID) practice that are commonly used in urban settings to improve the water quality and mitigate the hydrological effects of stormwater runoff. BRCs have been the subject of extensive research in order to better comprehend [...] Read more.
Bioretention cells (BRCs) are a promising low-impact development (LID) practice that are commonly used in urban settings to improve the water quality and mitigate the hydrological effects of stormwater runoff. BRCs have been the subject of extensive research in order to better comprehend their function and improve their effectiveness. However, BRC performance differs greatly among regions in terms of hydrologic performance and quality enhancement. Due to this variance in BRC effectiveness, the current study conducted a comprehensive systematic review to answer the question, “Are BRCs an effective LID method for urban catchment stormwater management?”. This review study analyzed the effectiveness of BRCs in mitigating hydrologic impacts and enhancing the quality of stormwater runoff in urban catchments. A review of 114 field, laboratory, and modeling studies on BRCs found that the promising BRCs may be one of the most successful approaches to restore urban hydrology cycle and improve stormwater water quality. With further development of BRCs, their performance in terms of quantity and quality will become more reliable, helping to develop long-term solutions to stormwater urban drainage issues. At the end of this review, the knowledge gaps and future prospects for BRC research are presented. In addition to providing a foundational grasp of BRC, this review study outlines the key design recommendations for BRC implementation in order to address the issues raised by certain BRC design errors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers of Urban Water Management)
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32 pages, 449 KiB  
Review
Modeling and Validation of Residential Water Demand in Agent-Based Models: A Systematic Literature Review
by Bernhard Jonathan Sattler, John Friesen, Andrea Tundis and Peter F. Pelz
Water 2023, 15(3), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030579 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2930
Abstract
Current challenges, such as climate change or military conflicts, show the great importance of urban supply infrastructures. In this context, an open question is how different scenarios and crises can be studied in silico to assess the interaction between the needs of social [...] Read more.
Current challenges, such as climate change or military conflicts, show the great importance of urban supply infrastructures. In this context, an open question is how different scenarios and crises can be studied in silico to assess the interaction between the needs of social systems and technical infrastructures. Agent-based modeling is a suitable method for this purpose. This review investigates (i) how agent-based models of residential water demand should be validated, (ii) how such models are commonly built and (iii) validated, and (iv) how these validation practices compare to the recommendations drawn from question (i). Therefore, a systematic literature review using the PRISMA framework is conducted. Out of 207 screened papers, 35 models are identified with an emphasis on highly realistic models (i.e., highly detailed and representing specific real-world systems) for planning, management, and policy of urban water resources. While some models are thoroughly validated, quantified validation distinct from calibration data should be emphasized and used to communicate the confidence in results and recommendations drawn from the models. Pattern-oriented validation, validation on multiple levels and on higher moments of aggregated statistics should be considered more often. These findings expand prior literature by providing a more extensive sample of reviewed articles and recommending specific approaches for the validation of models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers of Urban Water Management)
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24 pages, 1945 KiB  
Review
Green Infrastructure for Urban Flood Resilience: A Review of Recent Literature on Bibliometrics, Methodologies, and Typologies
by Mina Khodadad, Ismael Aguilar-Barajas and Ahmed Z. Khan
Water 2023, 15(3), 523; https://doi.org/10.3390/w15030523 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 6930
Abstract
Urban flood resilience can critically diminish the negative effects of extreme climatic conditions. In recent decades, green infrastructure has been gaining attention among researchers and authorities in terms of its use in urban contexts to enhance urban resilience. This paper tries to provide [...] Read more.
Urban flood resilience can critically diminish the negative effects of extreme climatic conditions. In recent decades, green infrastructure has been gaining attention among researchers and authorities in terms of its use in urban contexts to enhance urban resilience. This paper tries to provide knowledge on how urban flood resilience has been recently approached through green infrastructure. To do this, the distribution of the topics of interest, authors, and sources/regions of publication are investigated through a systematic review of recent articles. Additionally, the methodological approaches and green infrastructure typologies are examined. Findings show an agglomeration of publications in developed countries. It was also observed that there is a predominance of quantitative methodological approaches and a low connectivity for some hot topics within this field of research (e.g., biodiversity). The most common green infrastructure typologies used in urban flood resilience research are also discussed. It is noticeable that more than half of the papers used general terms (e.g., urban park/open space) to describe green infrastructure rather than using technical typologies providing more information on water flow management characteristics. The outcomes are discussed to give an overview of the latest hotspots and gaps in this field of research, which gives some future directions/expectations to be followed in forthcoming investigations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers of Urban Water Management)
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15 pages, 2147 KiB  
Review
Vegetated Roofs as a Means of Sustainable Urban Development: A Scoping Review
by Mohammad A. Rahman, Mohammad A. Alim, Sayka Jahan and Ataur Rahman
Water 2022, 14(19), 3188; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14193188 - 10 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2231
Abstract
Urbanisation affects the water cycle and heat balance in a negative way. Vegetated roofs have the potential to minimise the effects of urbanisation. A scoping review is presented here to examine how vegetated roofs are being evolved as an effective tool of sustainable [...] Read more.
Urbanisation affects the water cycle and heat balance in a negative way. Vegetated roofs have the potential to minimise the effects of urbanisation. A scoping review is presented here to examine how vegetated roofs are being evolved as an effective tool of sustainable urban stormwater management and overall urban development. It has been found that research on vegetated roofs has been increasing significantly and it can contribute towards achieving multiple sustainable development goals (SDGs). It has also been found that the uptake of vegetated roofs has been slow. A lack of regulatory acceptance caused by an absence of experimental data and a subsequent knowledge gap establishing the effectiveness of vegetated roofs are major reasons behind this slow uptake. Future research on vegetated roofs and their subsequent evolutions should put a focus on gathering experimental data towards establishing a performance benchmark for detention, retention and water quality in urban settings. Such data can be utilised towards developing a stand-alone guideline and software for green roof design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers of Urban Water Management)
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31 pages, 462 KiB  
Review
Comprehensive Environmental Assessment of Rainwater Harvesting Systems: A Literature Review
by Andréa Teston, Taylana Piccinini Scolaro, Jéssica Kuntz Maykot and Enedir Ghisi
Water 2022, 14(17), 2716; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14172716 - 31 Aug 2022
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 7982
Abstract
The feasibility of installing rainwater harvesting systems in buildings is usually defined based primarily on economic analysis. In this perspective, we reviewed the literature related to water consumption in buildings, rainwater use, and environmental assessment tools to evaluate the impact of rainwater harvesting [...] Read more.
The feasibility of installing rainwater harvesting systems in buildings is usually defined based primarily on economic analysis. In this perspective, we reviewed the literature related to water consumption in buildings, rainwater use, and environmental assessment tools to evaluate the impact of rainwater harvesting on the environment. Identifying water end uses in buildings showed a high potential for potable water savings through alternative sources (e.g., rainwater use for non-potable purposes). Most studies reviewed found potential for potable water savings from 20 to 65%. Moreover, the literature reported that rainwater harvesting systems might reduce the runoff volume from 13 to 91%. However, other possible benefits and impacts of the systems on water flow and the environment must be assessed in addition to the potential for rainwater harvesting. Life cycle assessment, life cycle cost assessment, and water balance modelling have been used in urban water management. Most life cycle studies reported that rainwater harvesting systems have better environmental performance than centralised systems. The water balance method may effectively determine the impacts these systems cause on the water cycle. Using life cycle assessment and the water balance method together is essential to evaluating rainwater harvesting systems integrated into the urban environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Papers of Urban Water Management)
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