Special Issue "Antivirals for Newly Emerging Viral Diseases of Global Importance"

A special issue of Viruses (ISSN 1999-4915). This special issue belongs to the section "Antivirals & Vaccines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mariana Baz
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Research Center in Infectious Diseases of the CHU of Québec and Université Laval, Québec City, QC G1V 4G2, Canada
Interests: influenza viruses; pathogenesis and transmission; antivirals; vaccines; high-risk populations; animal models; clinical studies; emerging and re-emerging viruses
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Edin Mifsud
Website
Guest Editor
World Health Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza at the Peter Doherty Institute, 792 Elizabeth St, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: Influenza virus; Bacterial co-infections; transmission; antivirals; vaccines; pathogenesis; animal models; antiviral resistance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Viral infections cause high morbidity and mortality. About 12% of known human pathogens have been recognized as either emerging or re-emerging. As evident by the current Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), emerging viruses are a major public health concern resulting in both health and economic challenges. Furthermore, the World Health Organization has listed COVID-19 along with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), Ebola, Marburg, and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Lassa fever, Rift Valley fever, and Zika as diseases which pose the greatest public health risk not only because of their pandemic potential but also because of the lack of countermeasures available to limit the spread and treat the disease caused.

The limited treatment options available to combat these emerging viruses have raised the need for broad-spectrum antivirals effective against a wide range of viruses. Substantial efforts have been made to develop novel therapeutic candidates including small molecules, peptides, monoclonal antibodies, novel viral and host cell targets, drug repurposing, new antiviral agents, and innovations in drug discovery against emerging viruses.

In this Special Issue, we aim to describe the most recent discoveries in antivirals for emerging viruses of global importance. We seek contributions of original research and review articles as well as short communications.

Dr. Mariana Baz
Dr. Edin Mifsud
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Viruses is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emerging and re-emerging viruses
  • antivirals
  • broadly acting antivirals
  • novel therapeutic strategies
  • antibodies
  • small molecules
  • drug repurposing
  • plant-derived antivirals
  • drug discovery
  • antiviral resistance
  • high-risk populations
  • animal models
  • zoonosis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Antiviral Bioactive Compounds of Mushrooms and Their Antiviral Mechanisms: A Review
Viruses 2021, 13(2), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13020350 - 23 Feb 2021
Viewed by 259
Abstract
Mushrooms are used in their natural form as a food supplement and food additive. In addition, several bioactive compounds beneficial for human health have been derived from mushrooms. Among them, polysaccharides, carbohydrate-binding protein, peptides, proteins, enzymes, polyphenols, triterpenes, triterpenoids, and several other compounds [...] Read more.
Mushrooms are used in their natural form as a food supplement and food additive. In addition, several bioactive compounds beneficial for human health have been derived from mushrooms. Among them, polysaccharides, carbohydrate-binding protein, peptides, proteins, enzymes, polyphenols, triterpenes, triterpenoids, and several other compounds exert antiviral activity against DNA and RNA viruses. Their antiviral targets were mostly virus entry, viral genome replication, viral proteins, and cellular proteins and influenced immune modulation, which was evaluated through pre-, simultaneous-, co-, and post-treatment in vitro and in vivo studies. In particular, they treated and relieved the viral diseases caused by herpes simplex virus, influenza virus, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Some mushroom compounds that act against HIV, influenza A virus, and hepatitis C virus showed antiviral effects comparable to those of antiviral drugs. Therefore, bioactive compounds from mushrooms could be candidates for treating viral infections. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antivirals for Newly Emerging Viral Diseases of Global Importance)
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