Advances in Environmental Toxicology and Wildlife Health

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Ecotoxicology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 12613

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Toxicology Unit, Research Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences (IUIBS), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Interests: biomonitoring; wildlife; analytical toxicology; ecotoxicology; pesticides; animal poisoning; liquid chromatography; gas chromatography; mass spectrometry

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Guest Editor
1. Toxicology Department, Research Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain
2. CIBER OBN, Biomedical Research Networking Center for Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition, Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain
Interests: toxicology; food safety; risk assessment; chromatography; mass spectrometry; environmental health; applied chemical analysis; chemical pollution
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vertebrate populations have decreased by more than 65% around the world since 1970, mainly due to loss of habitat, deforestation, and changes in land use toward industrialization, as well as intensive monoculture agriculture and livestock farming, leading to a greater use of chemicals (e.g., biocides, drugs), a larger emission associated with industrial environmental pollutants (mainly POPs and inorganic elements), and new emerging pollutants (like phthalates, bisphenols or perfluoroalkyls). These contaminants have acute (e.g., poisoning, intended or not) and, of major concern, subchronic/sublethal health effects (e.g., endocrine disruptors, decreased eggshell, reproductive/development, and immune failures, among others). Therefore, research in sources of exposure, subclinical effects, and the relationship to wildlife health should be identified. Biomonitoring of these substances and research on exposure and effect biomarkers are essential to know their distribution in ecosystems and to help in the management/assessment of risks for wildlife.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute with your original research articles or reviews for the Special Issue of Toxics on “Advances in Ecotoxicology and Wildlife Health”. The aim is to combine knowledge on environmental toxicology and its interaction with wildlife health by combining/updating data about on the occurrence, exposure, and effects on wildlife, through analysis of biomarkers and the most common chemicals.

Research areas may include the following (but not exclusively): analytical methods for wildlife biomonitoring of pollutants of concern and their effect and exposure biomarkers; routes of exposure and geographical distribution data; and, especially, repercussions on vertebrate animals, mainly subclinic and subchronic health effects.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Cristian Rial-Berriel
Prof. Dr. Octavio Pérez Luzardo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wildlife
  • rodenticides
  • POPs
  • biocides
  • ecotoxicology
  • wildlife health
  • biomarkers
  • biomonitoring
  • subchronic toxicity
  • pharmaceuticals

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 1202 KiB  
Article
Trace Elements and Contaminants Concentrations in Tissues of Caspian Seals (Pusa caspica) along the Iranian Coast
by Seyedeh Malihe Hoseini, Somayeh Namroodi, Amir Sayadshirazi and Annalisa Zaccaroni
Toxics 2023, 11(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics11010039 - 30 Dec 2022
Viewed by 2160
Abstract
The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) is an endangered species that only lives in the Caspian Sea. Little information is available on its exposure to contaminants, and no data exists for Southern sub-populations. From 2011 to 2016, tissues samples were collected from [...] Read more.
The Caspian seal (Pusa caspica) is an endangered species that only lives in the Caspian Sea. Little information is available on its exposure to contaminants, and no data exists for Southern sub-populations. From 2011 to 2016, tissues samples were collected from 20 Caspian seals to (i) Define the concentration of trace elements in five different matrices and the concentration of 30 pesticides in their blubber; (ii) Determine whether differences in contaminant concentrations are age- or sex-related; (iii) Evaluate if detected concentrations can represent a risk to the species. Age- and sex-related variations were detected for Zn and Hg in the blubber and Fe in the kidney by age only. Exceptionally high Hg concentrations and low levels of hepatic Zn were detected, raising some concern about the reproductive health of seals. Similarly, the DDTs levels detected were in the range of adverse reproductive effects in marine mammals. Based on these results, potentially adverse effects on the immune and endocrine systems of the Caspian seal cannot be ruled out. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance that pollutant monitoring becomes an integral component of conservation strategies for the Caspian seal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Toxicology and Wildlife Health)
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18 pages, 4690 KiB  
Article
Adverse Effects of Toxic Metal Pollution in Rivers on the Physiological Health of Fish
by Huong Thi Thuy Ngo, Thanh Dinh Nguyen, Tien Thi Hanh Nguyen, Thao Thanh Le and Dinh Quoc Nguyen
Toxics 2022, 10(9), 528; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10090528 - 8 Sep 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2188
Abstract
Toxic metal pollution influences the lives of diverse aquatic organisms and humans who consume contaminated aquatic products. However, its potential impacts on aquatic organism health and, thus, ecological health, have been neglected in many regions. This research was carried out to contribute to [...] Read more.
Toxic metal pollution influences the lives of diverse aquatic organisms and humans who consume contaminated aquatic products. However, its potential impacts on aquatic organism health and, thus, ecological health, have been neglected in many regions. This research was carried out to contribute to filling that knowledge gap. Three freshwater fish species in the Nhue–Day River basin, Vietnam, have been chosen to study the bioaccumulation of metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd) in the tissues (livers, kidneys, gills) and their effects on fish physiological health (changes in the oxidative-GST activity, and physiological biomarkers-energy reserves, respectively) from 2013 to 2017. The extensive results revealed significant spatial and temporal variations in metal concentrations in tissues of common carp (Cyprinus carpio), silver carp (Hypothalmic molitrix), and tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and well correlated to their concentration in the water (p < 0.05). Fish bioaccumulated metals in the following order: Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd, with more in the kidneys and livers (spring and summer) than in other tissues. Metal accumulation in O. niloticus and C. carpio was higher than in H. molitrix. Biomarker responses (except for glycogen variation) were also higher during warm seasons. Changes in metal levels in water and fish tissues caused variations in biomarkers in the respective fish tissues, particularly in the livers, as demonstrated by significant correlations of metal concentrations in water and fish tissues to biochemical and physiological responses (p < 0.05). The findings suggest that metal pollution in the river basin adversely impacts the physiological health of both wild and cultured fish. Seasonal shifts in the levels of metal accumulation and biomarkers could be connected to species-specific differences in physiology and the levels of metals in environments. This biomarker set is simple but effective in assessing the impact of metal pollution on fish health and, hence, the aquatic ecosystem. This is one of the first biomonitoring studies to assist in designing better water management strategies for the Nhue–Day River basin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Toxicology and Wildlife Health)
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12 pages, 2822 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Toxicity and Sublethal Effects of Acetamiprid and Dinotefuran on the Predator Chrysopa pallens (Rambur) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae)
by Yue Su, Xiangliang Ren, Xiaoyan Ma, Dan Wang, Hongyan Hu, Xianpeng Song, Jinjie Cui, Yan Ma and Yongsheng Yao
Toxics 2022, 10(6), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10060309 - 8 Jun 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2274
Abstract
Neonicotinoid insecticides affect the physiology or behavior of insects, posing risks to non-target organisms. In this study, the effects of sublethal doses of two neonicotinoid insecticides, acetamiprid and dinotefuran, against Chrysopa pallens (Rambur) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) were determined and compared. The results showed that [...] Read more.
Neonicotinoid insecticides affect the physiology or behavior of insects, posing risks to non-target organisms. In this study, the effects of sublethal doses of two neonicotinoid insecticides, acetamiprid and dinotefuran, against Chrysopa pallens (Rambur) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) were determined and compared. The results showed that acetamiprid and dinotefuran at LD10 (8.18 ng a.i. per insect and 9.36 ng a.i. per insect, respectively) and LD30 (16.84 ng a.i. per insect and 15.01 ng a.i. per insect, respectively) significantly prolonged the larval stages and pupal stages (except acetamiprid LD10), compared to control. In addition, acetamiprid and dinotefuran at LD30 significantly prolonged the adult preoviposition period (APOP) and total preoviposition period (TPOP). In contrast, the two insecticides at LD10 and LD30 had no significant effect on the longevity, fecundity, reproductive days, preadult survival rate (%), intrinsic rate of increase (r), net reproductive rate (R0), and finite rate of increase (λ). These results provide a theoretical basis for the rational use of these two insecticides and the utilization and protection of C. pallens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Toxicology and Wildlife Health)
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19 pages, 2177 KiB  
Article
Epidemiology of Animal Poisonings in the Canary Islands (Spain) during the Period 2014–2021
by Cristian Rial-Berriel, Andrea Acosta-Dacal, Manuel Zumbado, Luis Alberto Henríquez-Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana Macías-Montes, Luis D. Boada, María del Mar Travieso-Aja, Beatriz Martin-Cruz, Alejandro Suárez-Pérez, Miguel Ángel Cabrera-Pérez and Octavio P. Luzardo
Toxics 2021, 9(10), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9100267 - 14 Oct 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2770
Abstract
Animal poisoning is one of the greatest conservation threats facing wildlife. In a preliminary study in the oceanic archipelago of the Canary Islands, we showed that the degree of threat from this circumstance was very high-even higher than that reported in other regions [...] Read more.
Animal poisoning is one of the greatest conservation threats facing wildlife. In a preliminary study in the oceanic archipelago of the Canary Islands, we showed that the degree of threat from this circumstance was very high-even higher than that reported in other regions of continental Europe. Consequently, a legal framework for the effective prosecution of the crime of wildlife poisoning came into force in 2014 in this region. We present the results of the investigation of 961 animals and 84 baits sent to our laboratory for the diagnosis of animal poisonings during the period 2014–2021. We were able to identify poison as the cause of death in 251 animals and 61 baits. Carbofuran stands out as the main agent used in this archipelago. We have also detected an increasing tendency to use mixtures of several pesticides in the preparation of baits. The entry into operation of two canine patrols has led to the detection of more dead animals in the wild and a greater number of poisoned animals. The percentage of poison positives is significantly higher in areas with lower population density, corresponding to rural environments, as well as in areas with greater agricultural and livestock activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Toxicology and Wildlife Health)
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Review

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15 pages, 330 KiB  
Review
Metabolomics: A New Approach in the Evaluation of Effects in Human Beings and Wildlife Associated with Environmental Exposition to POPs
by Miriam Acosta-Tlapalamatl, Claudia Romo-Gómez, Arely Anaya-Hernández, Libertad Juárez-Santacruz, Juan Carlos Gaytán-Oyarzún, Otilio Arturo Acevedo-Sandoval and Edelmira García-Nieto
Toxics 2022, 10(7), 380; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10070380 - 9 Jul 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2241
Abstract
Human beings and wild organisms are exposed daily to a broad range of environmental stressors. Among them are the persistent organic pollutants that can trigger adverse effects on these organisms due to their toxicity properties. There is evidence that metabolomics can be used [...] Read more.
Human beings and wild organisms are exposed daily to a broad range of environmental stressors. Among them are the persistent organic pollutants that can trigger adverse effects on these organisms due to their toxicity properties. There is evidence that metabolomics can be used to identify biomarkers of effect by altering the profiles of endogenous metabolites in biological fluids or tissues. This approach is relatively new and has been used in vitro studies mainly. Therefore, this review addresses those that have used metabolomics as a key tool to identify metabolites associated with environmental exposure to POPs in wildlife and human populations and that can be used as biomarkers of effect. The published results suggest that the metabolic pathways that produce energy, fatty acids, and amino acids are commonly affected by POPs. Furthermore, these pathways can be promoters of additional effects. In the future, metabolomics combined with other omics will improve understanding of the origin, development, and progression of the effects caused by environmental exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Environmental Toxicology and Wildlife Health)
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