Special Issue "New and Novel Analytical Approaches to Measurement of Emerging Environmental Contaminants"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2021) | Viewed by 3687

Special Issue Editor

Dr. James Longstaffe
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Environmental Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
Interests: environmental chemistry; natural organic matter; soil and groundwater contamination; remediation; analytical instrumentation

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

This Special Issue will focus on studies related to the development and application of novel analytical methods to measure the occurrence of emerging contaminants in the environment. Conventional analytical methods for the routine measurement of chemical contaminants in the environment are, to a large degree, designed and optimized for the detection of compounds of concern that are commonly encountered in environmental systems. While conventional approaches are valuable for surveying and monitoring systems for contaminants of known or historical concern, many compounds of emerging environmental concern, including pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and other novel commercial and industrial compounds, are not always fully captured through these routine analytical approaches. This is due to a variety of reasons, including missing or unavailable analytical standards, matrix interferences, and uncertainty in relation to which compounds might be present and causing environmental problems. Currently, there is a significant advancement in the field of analytical environmental chemistry towards the development of novel analytical methods to increase our ability to discover and account for compounds that are either newly emerging as contaminants of concern or that have been historically overlooked.

Dr. James Longstaffe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • environmental analysis
  • emerging contaminants
  • nontargeted analysis
  • perfluoroalkyl substances
  • personal care products
  • pharmaceuticals
  • microplastics
  • environmental contaminants
  • chemosensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
An Easy Procedure to Quantify Anticoagulant Rodenticides and Pharmaceutical Active Compounds in Soils
Toxics 2021, 9(4), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9040083 - 10 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 859
Abstract
A modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extraction was validated for the extraction of seven coumarin anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) and 36 pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) residues in soil samples using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The aim of this [...] Read more.
A modified QuEChERS (quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe) extraction was validated for the extraction of seven coumarin anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) and 36 pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) residues in soil samples using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The aim of this work was to develop a method for the monitoring of these compounds in agricultural lands as well as in forensic applications for the determination of ARs poisoning. As far as is known, this is the first time that a QuEChERS-based method is used for the extraction of ARs in soil, as well as on such a quantity of PhACs. A matrix effect study was carried out on samples of soil devoted to agriculture in the midland area of the Canary Islands (clay loam type). It was in house validated (accuracy, precision, and linearity) at seven spiked levels between 0.5 and 50 ng g−1. The limits of quantification (LOQ) ranged between 0.5 and 50.0 ng g−1 and the limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.024 to 6.25 ng g−1. The method was then successfully used for both the determination of the target analytes in the soils from the agricultural plots that had been irrigated with regenerated water, and in the soil collected from underneath wild bird carcasses (which had been the subject of forensic investigation). Full article
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Article
A Toolbox for the Determination of Nitroaromatic Explosives in Marine Water, Sediment, and Biota Samples on Femtogram Levels by GC-MS/MS
Toxics 2021, 9(3), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9030060 - 16 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1271
Abstract
To determine the amount of the explosives 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and its metabolites in marine samples, a toolbox of methods was developed to enhance sample preparation and analysis of various types of marine samples, such as water, sediment, and different kinds of biota. [...] Read more.
To determine the amount of the explosives 1,3-dinitrobenzene, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and its metabolites in marine samples, a toolbox of methods was developed to enhance sample preparation and analysis of various types of marine samples, such as water, sediment, and different kinds of biota. To achieve this, established methods were adapted, improved, and combined. As a result, if explosive concentrations in sediment or mussel samples are greater than 10 ng per g, direct extraction allows for time-saving sample preparation; if concentrations are below 10 ng per g, techniques such as freeze-drying, ultrasonic, and solid-phase extraction can help to detect even picogram amounts. Two different GC-MS/MS methods were developed to enable the detection of these explosives in femtogram per microliter. With a splitless injector, limits of detection (LODs) between 77 and 333 fg/µL could be achieved in only 6.25 min. With the 5 µL programmable temperature vaporization—large volume method (PTV-LVI), LODs between 8 and 47 fg/µL could be achieved in less than 7 min. The detection limits achieved by these methods are among the lowest published to date. Their reliability has been tested and confirmed by measuring large and diverse sample sets. Full article
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Communication
2,2-Bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-1-Propanol—A Persistent Product of Bisphenol A Bio-Oxidation in Fortified Environmental Water, as Identified by HPLC/UV/ESI-MS
Toxics 2021, 9(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics9030049 - 05 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1075
Abstract
Biodegradation of bisphenol A in the environmental waters (lake, river, and sea) has been studied on the base of fortification of the samples taken and the biodegradation products have been analyzed using HPLC/UV/ESI-MS. Analysis of the characteristic fragmentation patterns of [M-H] ions [...] Read more.
Biodegradation of bisphenol A in the environmental waters (lake, river, and sea) has been studied on the base of fortification of the samples taken and the biodegradation products have been analyzed using HPLC/UV/ESI-MS. Analysis of the characteristic fragmentation patterns of [M-H] ions permitted unambiguous identification of the biodegradation products as 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol or as p-hydroxyacetophenone, depending on the type of surface water source. The formation of 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol was much more common than that of p-hydroxyacetophenone. Moreover, 2,2-Bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol has not been further biodegraded, in contrast to the p-hydroxyacetophenone, which was further mineralized. It has been proved, for the first time, that 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-propanol can be regarded as persistent product of bisphenol A biodegradation in the fortified environmental waters. Full article
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