Special Issue "Environmental Monitoring and Analysis of Persistent Organic Pollutants"

A special issue of Toxics (ISSN 2305-6304). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 450

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Vlasta Drevenkar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut za Medicinska Istrazivanja i Medicinu Rada, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: distribution of organic micropollutants (mainly pesticides and related compounds) in the environment (water, soil/sediments, air); sorption behaviour of organic micropollutants in soil interactions with humic substances and mineral sorbents; biochemical indicators of human exposure to pesticides; analytical methods for the determination of organic micropollutants in environmental and biological samples
Dr. Gordana Mendaš
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institut za Medicinska Istrazivanja i Medicinu Rada, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: pesticides and POPs analysis in environmental and biological samples; risk assessment; biomarkers of exposure; gas and liquid chromatography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are global pollutants of the biosphere with possible harmful effects on the ecosystem and human health. They comprise a group of 28 toxic compounds of different chemical classes listed in the Stockholm Convention on POPs, which aims to protect the environment and human health. POPs include chemicals used in agriculture (pesticides), industry (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, perfluorinated compounds), as well as unintentional industrial or combustion by-products, such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. POPs are highly persistent, bioaccumulative and biomagnifying since they resist chemical, biological, and photolytic degradation. They have been identified worldwide (even in remote regions where they have never been used) in air, water, soils/sediments, and biota, not only as a consequence of local contamination sources, but also as a result of efficient long-distance transport by circulation of air masses and waters. POPs enter the aquatic environment through dry and wet atmospheric deposition and attach to soil particles in water runoffs or by waste waters. Due to their tendency to sorb to suspended particulate matter, POPs accumulate in aquatic (marine, river, lake) sediments as one of their main sinks.

For the trace determination of POPs in complex environmental and biological matrices, highly selective and sensitive analytical methods are fundamental. Most of these methods are based on the selective extraction of target compounds and analysis of purified extracts by high resolution instrumental techniques, such as gas or liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

This Special Issue of Toxics will focus on a) the current state of environmental pollution with POPs, with an emphasis on their origin, temporal and spatial distribution, and long-term trends in different environmental compartments, and b) recent advances in analytical methods developed for the identification and quantification of POPs in different environmental and biological matrices, such as air, water, soils, sediments, and biota. Original research articles, reviews, and short communications are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Vlasta Drevenkar
Dr. Gordana Mendaš
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • persistent organic pollutants
  • environmental monitoring
  • temporal and spatial distribution
  • long-term trends
  • analytical methods
  • POPs quantitation
  • water
  • air
  • soil/sediments
  • biota

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Emerging Contaminant Imidacloprid in Mediterranean Soils: The Risk of Accumulation Is Greater than the Risk of Leaching
Toxics 2022, 10(7), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxics10070358 - 30 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Imidacloprid (IMI) is an extensively used neonicotinoid insecticide whose occurrence in the environment is a worldwide problem. Its sorption/transport properties are recognized as one of the key knowledge gaps hindering policymaking regarding its international routine monitoring in soils. Therefore, we studied IMI transport [...] Read more.
Imidacloprid (IMI) is an extensively used neonicotinoid insecticide whose occurrence in the environment is a worldwide problem. Its sorption/transport properties are recognized as one of the key knowledge gaps hindering policymaking regarding its international routine monitoring in soils. Therefore, we studied IMI transport behaviour in Croatian Mediterranean soils using column experiments. Breakthrough curves were analysed using the two-site adsorption model and compared against dimethoate (DIM). Transport parameters were correlated to soil physicochemical properties. The results indicate that IMI shows a high degree of preference for soil organic matter over any other soil constituent. For IMI, the clay did not exhibit any sorption activity, while hematite did act as an active sorbent. Contrarily, hematite increased the leachability of DIM by blocking the active sorption sites on clay platelets. Both hematite and clay sorption acted as type-2 (i.e., rate-limiting) sites. In all soils, IMI exhibited lower short-term leachability than DIM. Combined with a body of data concerning other aspects of IMI environmental behaviour, the results indicate that the risk of accumulation of IMI in the soil is greater than the risk of contamination by leaching. Thus, continuous monitoring of IMI in soils should be incorporated into future soil health protection programs. Full article
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