Special Issue "Asymmetric Membranes"

A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Maria Giovanna Buonomenna
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Consiglio Nazionale Dei Chimici (CNC), Rome, Italy
Interests: membrane science and technology for sustainable processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, membranes are key components in various relevant fields. In fact, their application is gradually increasing from traditional fields, such as water desalination and purification and food processing, to applications in oil and petrochemical, biopharmaceutical, power and energy-related industries.

Asymmetric membranes consist of a number of layers, each with different structures and permeabilities. Asymmetric membranes can be considered hierarchically-structured systems where well and purposefully hierarchical structures are designed to overcome transport limitations. In this context, worthy of mention is the recent special issue on hierarchically-structured porous materials edited by Martin Hartmann and Wilhelm Schwieger [1].

The present Special Issue of Symmetry features articles about membranes of different materials for different applications, with asymmetry as the unifying theme. We are soliciting contributions covering a broad range of topics including: polymers based membranes (polymers of intrinsic microporosity, high free volumes polymers, block copolymers, semi-glassy polymers, amorphous polymers); inorganic membranes (zeolites membranes, carbon molecular sieves membranes, ceramic membranes, silica membranes); mixed matrix membranes and inorganic and organic hybrid materials based membranes such as MOF membranes.

Prof. Dr. Maria Giovanna Buonomenna
Guest Editor

References

[1] Martin Hartmann and Wilhelm Schwieger, Hierarchically-structured porous materials: from basic understanding to applications, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2016, 45, 3311.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Symmetry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • asymmetric membranes
  • inorganic membranes
  • polymeric membranes
  • porous membranes
  • membrane design

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Mechanical Vibration for the Control of Membrane Fouling in Direct Contact Membrane Distillation
Symmetry 2019, 11(2), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym11020126 - 22 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
One of the biggest challenges for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) in treating wastewater from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is the rapid deterioration of membrane performance resulting from precipitate fouling. Chemical pretreatment, such as lime-soda ash softening, has been used to mitigate the [...] Read more.
One of the biggest challenges for direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) in treating wastewater from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is the rapid deterioration of membrane performance resulting from precipitate fouling. Chemical pretreatment, such as lime-soda ash softening, has been used to mitigate the issue, however, with significant operating costs. In this study, mechanical vibration of 42.5 Hz was applied to lab-scale DCMD systems to determine its effectiveness of fouling control for simulated FGD water. Liquid entry pressure and mass transfer limit of the fabricated hollow fiber membranes were determined and used as the operational constraints in the fouling experiments so that the observed membrane performance was influenced solely by precipitate fouling. Minimal improvement of water flux was observed when applying vibration after significant (~16%) water-flux decline. Initiating vibration at the onset of the experiments prior to the exposure of foulants, however, was promising for the reduction of membrane fouling. The water-flux decline rate was reduced by about 50% when compared to the rate observed without vibration. Increasing the module packing density from 16% to 50% resulted in a similar rate of water-flux decline, indicating that the fouling propensity was not increased with packing density in the presence of vibration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asymmetric Membranes)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Recent Progress in Modification of Polymeric Membranes Using Organic Macromolecules for Water Treatment
Symmetry 2020, 12(2), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym12020239 - 04 Feb 2020
Abstract
For decades, the water deficit has been a severe global issue. A reliable supply of water is needed to ensure sustainable economic development in population growth, industrialization and urbanization. To solve this major challenge, membrane-based water treatment technology has attracted a great deal [...] Read more.
For decades, the water deficit has been a severe global issue. A reliable supply of water is needed to ensure sustainable economic development in population growth, industrialization and urbanization. To solve this major challenge, membrane-based water treatment technology has attracted a great deal of attention to produce clean drinking water from groundwater, seawater and brackish water. The emergence of nanotechnology in membrane science has opened new frontiers in the development of advanced polymeric membranes to enhance filtration performance. Nevertheless, some obstacles such as fouling and trade-off of membrane selectivity and permeability of water have hindered the development of traditional polymeric membranes for real applications. To overcome these issues, the modification of membranes has been pursued. The use of macromolecules for membrane modification has attracted wide interests in recent years owing to their interesting chemical and structural properties. Membranes modified with macromolecules have exhibited improved anti-fouling properties due to the alteration of their physiochemical properties in terms of the membrane morphology, porosity, surface charge, wettability, and durability. This review provides a comprehensive review of the progress made in the development of macromolecule modified polymeric membranes. The role of macromolecules in polymeric membranes and the advancement of these membrane materials for water solution are presented. The challenges and future directions for this subject are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asymmetric Membranes)

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Open AccessCommentary
Design Next Generation Membranes or Rethink the “Old” Asymmetric Membranes?
Symmetry 2020, 12(2), 270; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym12020270 (registering DOI) - 10 Feb 2020
Abstract
The first integrally-skinned asymmetric cellulose acetate (CA) membrane for water desalination were developed by Loeb and Sourirajan in the early 1960s at UCLA [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asymmetric Membranes)
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