Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics

A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994). This special issue belongs to the section "Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 22996

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN 1211, Geneva 23, Switzerland

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Symmetries are at the core of many aspects of fundamental physics and in particular quantum field theory, which the Standard Model of particles and interactions builds on. For instance, the Higgs boson was predicted in 1964 as a result of spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking. For a long time, it was the last missing building block of the Standard Model. Therefore, its observation by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 is one of the most important physics discoveries of the past few decades. It was achieved after only two years of proton–proton collision data-taking at the LHC, and at lower energies than those reached in the Run-2 of the LHC in 2015-2018. Particle physicists now have a large dataset at their disposal in order to measure the properties of Higgs bosons, but also to probe other Standard Model processes with unique precision. However, the Standard Model is known for not being a complete theory, and new physics is expected at the energy scale that LHC experiments can now probe. This Special Issue of Symmetry reviews the latest advances in particle physics as a result of LHC data-analyses, in particular Standard Model measurements and searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

The experimental results provided by the LHC would not have been possible without significant advances in the field of accelerator physics. However, accelerators are also central tools in other areas of particle physics, e.g., for fixed-target experiments and neutrino physics. Advances in accelerator physics are crucial to reach both high-energy and high-intensity frontiers in the post-LHC era, and as such, recent developments in this field of research will also be reviewed in this Special Issue of Symmetry.

We hereby solicit contributions of review and research articles covering a broad range on recent advances in accelerator and particle physics, including (but not limited to) the following topics:
  • Measurements of Higgs boson properties and search for rare decays;
  • Searches for new physics in the Higgs sector;
  • Top-quark physics;
  • B-physics;
  • Standard Model electroweak processes;
  • Standard Model QCD processes;
  • Heavy-ion physics;
  • Indirect searches for new physics through precision measurements, including EFT interpretations;
  • Direct searches for new physics;
  • Accelerators for Dark Matter searches;
  • Accelerators for neutrino physics;
  • Accelerators for non-LHC experiments;
  • Accelerator developments towards the high-energy and high-intensity frontiers;
  • Detector developments towards the high-energy and high-intensity frontiers.
Prof. Arnaud Ferrari
Dr. Jan Kieseler
Guest Editors
Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Symmetry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Standard Model measurements
  • Higgs boson(s)
  • Beyond-the-Standard-Model physics
  • High-energy frontier
  • High-intensity frontier

Published Papers (10 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

20 pages, 5085 KiB  
Article
The AWAKE Run 2 Programme and Beyond
by Edda Gschwendtner, Konstantin Lotov, Patric Muggli, Matthew Wing, Riccardo Agnello, Claudia Christina Ahdida, Maria Carolina Amoedo Goncalves, Yanis Andrebe, Oznur Apsimon, Robert Apsimon, Jordan Matias Arnesano, Anna-Maria Bachmann, Diego Barrientos, Fabian Batsch, Vittorio Bencini, Michele Bergamaschi, Patrick Blanchard, Philip Nicholas Burrows, Birger Buttenschön, Allen Caldwell, James Chappell, Eric Chevallay, Moses Chung, David Andrew Cooke, Heiko Damerau, Can Davut, Gabor Demeter, Amos Christopher Dexter, Steffen Doebert, Francesa Ann Elverson, John Farmer, Ambrogio Fasoli, Valentin Fedosseev, Ricardo Fonseca, Ivo Furno, Spencer Gessner, Aleksandr Gorn, Eduardo Granados, Marcel Granetzny, Tim Graubner, Olaf Grulke, Eloise Daria Guran, Vasyl Hafych, Anthony Hartin, James Henderson, Mathias Hüther, Miklos Kedves, Fearghus Keeble, Vadim Khudiakov, Seong-Yeol Kim, Florian Kraus, Michel Krupa, Thibaut Lefevre, Linbo Liang, Shengli Liu, Nelson Lopes, Miguel Martinez Calderon, Stefano Mazzoni, David Medina Godoy, Joshua Moody, Kookjin Moon, Pablo Israel Morales Guzmán, Mariana Moreira, Tatiana Nechaeva, Elzbieta Nowak, Collette Pakuza, Harsha Panuganti, Ans Pardons, Kevin Pepitone, Aravinda Perera, Jan Pucek, Alexander Pukhov, Rebecca Louise Ramjiawan, Stephane Rey, Adam Scaachi, Oliver Schmitz, Eugenio Senes, Fernando Silva, Luis Silva, Christine Stollberg, Alban Sublet, Catherine Swain, Athanasios Topaloudis, Nuno Torrado, Petr Tuev, Marlene Turner, Francesco Velotti, Livio Verra, Victor Verzilov, Jorge Vieira, Helmut Vincke, Martin Weidl, Carsten Welsch, Manfred Wendt, Peerawan Wiwattananon, Joseph Wolfenden, Benjamin Woolley, Samuel Wyler, Guoxing Xia, Vlada Yarygova, Michael Zepp and Giovanni Zevi Della Portaadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Symmetry 2022, 14(8), 1680; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym14081680 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3441
Abstract
Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising technology to reduce the size of particle accelerators. The use of high energy protons to drive wakefields in plasma has been demonstrated during Run 1 of the AWAKE programme at CERN. Protons of energy 400 GeV drove [...] Read more.
Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising technology to reduce the size of particle accelerators. The use of high energy protons to drive wakefields in plasma has been demonstrated during Run 1 of the AWAKE programme at CERN. Protons of energy 400 GeV drove wakefields that accelerated electrons to 2 GeV in under 10 m of plasma. The AWAKE collaboration is now embarking on Run 2 with the main aims to demonstrate stable accelerating gradients of 0.5–1 GV/m, preserve emittance of the electron bunches during acceleration and develop plasma sources scalable to 100s of metres and beyond. By the end of Run 2, the AWAKE scheme should be able to provide electron beams for particle physics experiments and several possible experiments have already been evaluated. This article summarises the programme of AWAKE Run 2 and how it will be achieved as well as the possible application of the AWAKE scheme to novel particle physics experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 10495 KiB  
Article
The THDMa Revisited
by Tania Robens
Symmetry 2021, 13(12), 2341; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13122341 - 6 Dec 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2018
Abstract
The THDMa is a new physics model that extends the scalar sector of the Standard Model by an additional doublet as well as a pseudoscalar singlet and allows for mixing between all possible scalar states. In the gauge-eigenbasis, the additional pseudoscalar serves as [...] Read more.
The THDMa is a new physics model that extends the scalar sector of the Standard Model by an additional doublet as well as a pseudoscalar singlet and allows for mixing between all possible scalar states. In the gauge-eigenbasis, the additional pseudoscalar serves as a portal to the dark sector, with a priori any dark matter spins states. The option where dark matter is fermionic is currently one of the standard benchmarks for the experimental collaborations, and several searches at the LHC constrain the corresponding parameter space. However, most current studies constrain regions in parameter space by setting all but 2 of the 12 free parameters to fixed values. In this work, we performed a generic scan on this model, allowing all parameters to float. We applied all current theoretical and experimental constraints, including bounds from current searches, recent results from B-physics, in particular BsXsγ, as well as bounds from astroparticle physics. We identify regions in the parameter space which are still allowed after these were applied and which might be interesting for an investigation of current and future collider machines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

38 pages, 3666 KiB  
Article
Exploration of Extended Higgs Sectors with Run-2 Proton–Proton Collision Data at the LHC
by Arnaud Ferrari and Nikolaos Rompotis
Symmetry 2021, 13(11), 2144; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13112144 - 10 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2196 | Correction
Abstract
One doublet of complex scalar fields is the minimal content of the Higgs sector in order to achieve spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking and, in turn, to generate the masses of fundamental particles in the Standard Model. However, several theories beyond the Standard Model [...] Read more.
One doublet of complex scalar fields is the minimal content of the Higgs sector in order to achieve spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking and, in turn, to generate the masses of fundamental particles in the Standard Model. However, several theories beyond the Standard Model predict a nonminimal Higgs sector and introduce additional singlets, doublets or even higher-order weak isospin representations, thereby yielding additional Higgs bosons. With its high proton–proton collision energy (13 TeV during Run-2), the Large Hadron Collider opens a new window towards the exploration of extended Higgs sectors. This review article summarises the current state-of-the-art experimental results recently obtained in searches for new neutral and charged Higgs bosons with a partial or full Run-2 dataset. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

27 pages, 2881 KiB  
Review
Top Quarks from Tevatron to the LHC
by Andreas Jung and Jan Kieseler
Symmetry 2023, 15(10), 1915; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym15101915 - 13 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1184
Abstract
Recent measurements in the top quark sector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are discussed. This review discusses the most recent measurements of inclusive and differential top quark cross-sections in strong and electroweak production of top quarks and related measurements, such as top [...] Read more.
Recent measurements in the top quark sector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are discussed. This review discusses the most recent measurements of inclusive and differential top quark cross-sections in strong and electroweak production of top quarks and related measurements, such as top quark properties, as well as searches, including EFT approaches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

29 pages, 6645 KiB  
Review
Searching for Pairs of Higgs Bosons in the LHC Run 2 Dataset
by Elizabeth Brost and Luca Cadamuro
Symmetry 2022, 14(7), 1467; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym14071467 - 18 Jul 2022
Viewed by 2499
Abstract
The discovery of the Higgs boson confirms the existence of a scalar sector of the standard model, responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, but the nature and properties of the potential at the origin of this mechanism are still unknown. By studying the production [...] Read more.
The discovery of the Higgs boson confirms the existence of a scalar sector of the standard model, responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking, but the nature and properties of the potential at the origin of this mechanism are still unknown. By studying the production of pairs of Higgs bosons (HH), physicists can directly measure the coupling of the Higgs boson to itself and thus determine the shape of this potential, which has far-reaching implications on the origin and evolution of our Universe. Because of this deep connection to the foundations of electroweak symmetry breaking, HH production is also an ideal place to search for manifestations of yet-unknown physics, such as modifications of the strength of the self-coupling and of the interaction between pairs of vector bosons and Higgs bosons. In this review article, we summarize the current searches for HH production at ATLAS and CMS, using the LHC Run 2 dataset, discuss the implications of our current constraints on physics beyond the standard model, and briefly review prospect for future HH searches. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

52 pages, 4925 KiB  
Review
Searching for New Physics in Hadronic Final States with Run 2 Proton–Proton Collision Data at the LHC
by Steven Schramm
Symmetry 2022, 14(6), 1173; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym14061173 - 7 Jun 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1751
Abstract
The symmetries of the Standard Model give rise to the forces that act on particles, and the corresponding force mediators. While the Standard Model is an excellent description of particle interactions, it has known limitations; it is therefore important to search for new [...] Read more.
The symmetries of the Standard Model give rise to the forces that act on particles, and the corresponding force mediators. While the Standard Model is an excellent description of particle interactions, it has known limitations; it is therefore important to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model, potentially indicating as-of-yet unknown symmetries of nature. The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have detailed physics programmes, involving a large number of searches for new physics in hadronic final states. As the start of Run 3 of the LHC is imminent, now is a good time to review the progress made and the status of hadronic searches during Run 2 at a centre-of-mass collision energy of s=13TeV. This review provides an overview of the motivations and challenges of hadronic final states at the LHC, followed by an introduction to jet reconstruction, calibration, and tagging. Three classes of searches for new physics in hadronic final states are discussed: di-jet searches, searches for missing transverse momentum in association with another object, and searches for hadronic di-boson resonances. The complementarity of these different analysis strategies is discussed, emphasising the importance of a varied hadronic physics programme in the search for new physics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

41 pages, 3470 KiB  
Review
Looking beyond the Standard Model with Third Generation Quarks at the LHC
by Hector de la Torre and Trisha Farooque
Symmetry 2022, 14(3), 444; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym14030444 - 23 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2214
Abstract
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is at the frontier of collider physics today, probing new physics at unprecedented energy scales. Many theories of physics beyond the Standard Model seek to elucidate the underlying mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Given their large Yukawa couplings [...] Read more.
The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is at the frontier of collider physics today, probing new physics at unprecedented energy scales. Many theories of physics beyond the Standard Model seek to elucidate the underlying mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. Given their large Yukawa couplings to the Higgs boson, third generations quarks of the Standard Model, and especially the top quark, play a key role in such theories. Therefore, new particles predicted by these theories often couple preferentially to top and bottom quarks. The favoured coupling to third generation can also be used to explain recently observed flavour physics anomalies in the LHCb, Babar or Belle experiments. This article will review recent searches for new physics performed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC, in final states containing top and bottom quarks. In particular, searches for vector-like quarks, leptoquarks, and heavy scalar and gauge bosons will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

66 pages, 4469 KiB  
Review
Searches for Resonant Scalar Boson Pair Production Using Run 2 LHC Proton-Proton Collision Data
by Jason Veatch
Symmetry 2022, 14(2), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym14020260 - 28 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2198
Abstract
The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 provided confirmation of spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking as the mechanism by which fundamental particles gain mass and thus completed the Standard Model of particle physics. Additionally, it opened a new approach to searching for potential [...] Read more.
The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 provided confirmation of spontaneous electroweak symmetry breaking as the mechanism by which fundamental particles gain mass and thus completed the Standard Model of particle physics. Additionally, it opened a new approach to searching for potential new particles. Many beyond the Standard Model theories predict new heavy particles that couple to the Higgs boson, leading to a resonant production mode of Higgs boson pairs. Other theories extend the Higgs sector by introducing additional scalar bosons that differ from the observed Higgs boson only by mass. The ATLAS and CMS Collaborations have searched for evidence of such processes using s=13 TeV Run 2 proton-proton collision data at the Large Hadron Collider. This review article summarizes the latest experimental results from searches for resonant production of pairs of Higgs bosons or additional Higgs-like scalar bosons at ATLAS and CMS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

34 pages, 5980 KiB  
Review
A New Generation of Neutrino Cross Section Experiments: Challenges and Opportunities
by Antonio Branca, Giulia Brunetti, Andrea Longhin, Marco Martini, Fabio Pupilli and Francesco Terranova
Symmetry 2021, 13(9), 1625; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13091625 - 3 Sep 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2705
Abstract
Our knowledge of neutrino cross sections at the GeV scale, instrumental to test CP symmetry violation in the leptonic sector, has grown substantially in the last two decades. Still, their precision and understanding are far from the standard needed in contemporary neutrino physics. [...] Read more.
Our knowledge of neutrino cross sections at the GeV scale, instrumental to test CP symmetry violation in the leptonic sector, has grown substantially in the last two decades. Still, their precision and understanding are far from the standard needed in contemporary neutrino physics. Nowadays, the knowledge of the neutrino cross section at O(10%) causes the main systematic uncertainty in oscillation experiments and jeopardizes their physics reach. In this paper, we envision the opportunities for a new generation of cross section experiments to be run in parallel with DUNE and HyperKamiokande. We identify the most prominent physics goals by looking at the theory and experimental limitations of the previous generation of experiments. We highlight the priorities in the theoretical understanding of GeV cross sections and the experimental challenges of this new generation of facilities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

1 pages, 194 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Ferrari, A.; Rompotis, N. Exploration of Extended Higgs Sectors with Run-2 Proton–Proton Collision Data at the LHC. Symmetry 2021, 13, 2144
by Arnaud Ferrari and Nikolaos Rompotis
Symmetry 2022, 14(8), 1546; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym14081546 - 28 Jul 2022
Viewed by 879
Abstract
With respect to the original review article [1], the corrected couplings of the Higgs doublets Φ1 and Φ2 in the 2HDM type-I, type-II, lepton-specific and flipped scenarios are shown in Table 1 [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advance in Accelerator and Particle Physics)
Back to TopTop