Special Issue "Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering in Complex Systems"

A special issue of Symmetry (ISSN 2073-8994). This special issue belongs to the section "Computer Science and Symmetry/Asymmetry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 1714

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Atsuo Murata
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Intelligent Mechanical Systems, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
Interests: ergonomics; safety management; cognitive engineering
Prof. Dr. Waldemar Karwowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
Interests: human systems integration; ergonomics and safety; systems engineering; human-computer interaction; fuzzy logic and neuro-fuzzy modeling; complex systems; nonlinear dynamics in human performance; neuroergonomics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Asymmetry has been found ubiquitously in nature, economics, or human–machine interactions. Asymmetric features of information are of great importance to study complex human behaviors in complex socioeconomic systems. For example, an imbalance between a sender and a receiver of the information can lead to communication failures in a variety of activities. Symmetry also plays a fundamental role in understanding human–system–environment interactions and applying the human-center design principles to various complex problems. Asymmetry can cause increasing uncertainty when managing human–machine interactions and lead to significant accidents or failures of design in complex systems.

For this Special Issue, we invite authors to submit their research on any aspects of asymmetry (or symmetry) that are critical to the description, modeling, analysis, or investigation of complex systems with a focus on human–machine interactions in the fields of human factors, ergonomics, safety, industrial sociology, applied psychology, cognitive engineering, and industrial engineering and management.

Prof. Dr. Atsuo Murata
Prof. Dr. Waldemar Karwowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Symmetry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • asymmetry in human factors and safety engineering
  • asymmetry in human perception and cognition
  • asymmetry in human information processing and decision making
  • asymmetry and complexity in human behavior
  • asymmetry and complexity of human and organizational performance
  • asymmetry and complexity in organizations

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Delayed Evacuation after a Disaster Because of Irrational Prediction of the Future Cumulative Precipitation Time Series under Asymmetry of Information
Symmetry 2022, 14(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym14010006 - 22 Dec 2021
Viewed by 648
Abstract
This study investigated biased prediction of cumulative precipitation, using a variety of patterns of histories of cumulative precipitation, to explore how such biased prediction could delay evacuation or evacuation orders. The irrationality in predicting the future of cumulative precipitation was examined to obtain [...] Read more.
This study investigated biased prediction of cumulative precipitation, using a variety of patterns of histories of cumulative precipitation, to explore how such biased prediction could delay evacuation or evacuation orders. The irrationality in predicting the future of cumulative precipitation was examined to obtain insights into the causes of delayed evacuation or evacuation orders using a simulated prediction of future cumulative precipitation based on the cumulative precipitation history. Anchoring and adjustment, or availability bias stemming from asymmetry of information, was observed in the prediction of cumulative precipitation, and found to delay evacuation or evacuation orders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering in Complex Systems)
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Article
Irrationality of Attitudes toward Safety under Complexity and Uncertainty Leading to Asymmetry of Information
Symmetry 2021, 13(11), 2111; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym13112111 - 07 Nov 2021
Viewed by 610
Abstract
This study investigated how complexity and uncertainty, the probability of accidents, and the probability of financial trouble affected individuals’ recognition of validity of irrational risk-seeking decisions. As a result of conducting a multiple regression analysis on the validation score for irrational risk-seeking alternative [...] Read more.
This study investigated how complexity and uncertainty, the probability of accidents, and the probability of financial trouble affected individuals’ recognition of validity of irrational risk-seeking decisions. As a result of conducting a multiple regression analysis on the validation score for irrational risk-seeking alternative obtained by a questionnaire survey, we found that the validity score for an irrational risk-seeking alternative was higher when both complexity and uncertainty were high than when both complexity and uncertainty were low, which means that high complexity and high uncertainty in the situation of decision making more readily leads to an irrational risk-seeking behavior that might trigger a major accident. Beyond complexity and uncertainty, the damage of major accident α, the decrease of the probability of major accidents and the increase of the probability of financial trouble (economic factor) were also found to promote the choice of irrational risk-seeking alternatives. Some implications for safety management under high complexity and uncertainty are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Factors and Cognitive Engineering in Complex Systems)
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