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Innovative Strategies for the Sustainable Strengthening of Existing Buildings

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2022) | Viewed by 5289

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, University of Napoli Federico II, Via Forno Vecchio, 36, 80134 Napoli, Italy
Interests: structural analysis; earthquake engineering; architectural heritage; masonry structures; contact mechanics; innovative strengthening systems
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Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Systems, Territory and Constructions Engineering, University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: earthquake engineering; sustainable buildings; structural dynamics; historic structures; resilient infrastructures; mechanical characterization of building materials
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few decades, significant developments have been made to improve the structural performance of existing buildings against different hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, wind, blasts) using traditional and innovative strengthening/retrofitting systems. The sustainability of such systems needs to be tackled in many challenging aspects, such as material compatibility, reversibility and durability of the intervention, reduction of cost, time, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy optimization.

This Special Issue focuses on advanced strengthening/retrofitting techniques, even integrated with solutions for energy saving or for the reduction of environmental impacts, and on recent developments in experimental and numerical investigation methods for strengthened/retrofitted constructions, with reference to masonry, reinforced concrete, and timber structures. Original research articles and literature reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following issues:

  • Analytical and computational strategies for strengthening existing buildings;
  • Sustainable retrofitting solutions for buildings;
  • Efficiency of low-impact interventions;
  • Parametric analyses for the optimization of effectiveness, costs, and impact of interventions;
  • In-plane and out-of-plane behavior of unreinforced and reinforced masonry structures;
  • Comparison of the effects of traditional and innovative strengthening systems;
  • Energy saving of sustainable buildings;
  • Experimental investigation and modeling of integrated interventions;
  • Environmental impact of retrofitting solutions;
  • Life cycle analysis of sustainable structures;
  • Performance of geopolymer composites;
  • Case studies.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Casapulla
Dr. Linda Giresini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cultural heritage
  • energy retrofit
  • structural performance
  • masonry structures
  • smart buildings
  • life-cycle assessment
  • strengthening systems
  • resilience of structures
  • sustainable buildings
  • low-impact solutions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 4833 KiB  
Article
LCA of Mortar with Calcined Clay and Limestone Filler in RC Column Retrofit
by Brian E. Bautista, Jason Maximino C. Ongpeng and Luis F. Razon
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1175; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031175 - 20 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2518
Abstract
Cement manufacture contributes about 5–7% of the global carbon dioxide emission. The fastest short-term remedy is to replace parts of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in concrete with supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) to reduce CO2 emissions. Calcined clay and limestone filler have proven [...] Read more.
Cement manufacture contributes about 5–7% of the global carbon dioxide emission. The fastest short-term remedy is to replace parts of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in concrete with supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) to reduce CO2 emissions. Calcined clay and limestone filler have proven to be potential substitutes to good quality SCMs such as fly ash and slag because of their abundance, low cost, and potential reactivity to calcium hydroxide to form calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) which are responsible for the strength and other mechanical properties of concrete. A life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the environmental impact of mortar with calcined clay and limestone filler in reinforced concrete (RC) column retrofitting is carried out using data from a multi-purpose complex project in Rizal province in the Philippines. A total of four retrofitting methods are evaluated based on two retrofitting techniques (RC column jacketing and steel jacketing) with two material alternatives (pure OPC-based mortar and mortar with partial replacements). Results show that RC column jacketing using patched mortar with partial replacement of calcined clay and limestone fillers is the least environmentally damaging retrofit option. The use of these SCMs resulted in a 4–7% decrease in global warming potential and a 2–4% decrease in fine particulate matter formation. Meanwhile, RC column jacketing decreased the effect on human carcinogenic toxicity by 75% compared to steel jacketing. Full article
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26 pages, 7048 KiB  
Article
Environmental and Economic Impact of Retrofitting Techniques to Prevent Out-of-Plane Failure Modes of Unreinforced Masonry Buildings
by Linda Giresini, Claudia Casapulla and Pietro Croce
Sustainability 2021, 13(20), 11383; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132011383 - 15 Oct 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2004
Abstract
This paper presents an innovative methodology to assess the economic and environmental impact of integrated interventions, namely solutions that improve both structural and energy performance of existing masonry buildings, preventing out-of-plane modes and increasing their energy efficiency. The procedure allows the assessment of [...] Read more.
This paper presents an innovative methodology to assess the economic and environmental impact of integrated interventions, namely solutions that improve both structural and energy performance of existing masonry buildings, preventing out-of-plane modes and increasing their energy efficiency. The procedure allows the assessment of the environmental and the economic normalized costs of each integrated intervention, considering seismic and energy-saving indicators. In addition, the work introduces in relative or absolute terms two original indicators, associated with seismic displacement and thermal transmittance. The iso-cost curves so derived are thus a powerful tool to compare alternative solutions, aiming to identify the most advantageous one. In fact, iso-cost curves can be used with a twofold objective: to determine the optimal integrated intervention associated with a given economic/environmental impact, or, as an alternative, to derive the pairs of seismic and energy performance indicators associated with a given budget. The analysis of a somehow relevant case study reveals that small energy savings could imply excessive environmental impacts, disproportionally increasing the carbon footprint characterizing each intervention. Iso-cost curves in terms of absolute indicators are more suitable for assessing the effects of varying acceleration demands on a given building, while iso-cost curves in terms of relative indicators are more readable to consider a plurality of cases, located in different sites. The promising results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method, stimulating further studies. Full article
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