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Rural Tourism and Sustainable Development of Local Economy in Developing Countries

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 15104

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Economics, Business and Tourism, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain
Interests: Tourism marketing; destination image; sustainability; loyalty; image; biometric analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Economics, Business and Tourism, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain
Interests: Marketing; Social Media; Sustainable Tourism; Destination Loyalty; Destination Image; Islands Tourism; Event Tourism; Emotions; Consumer Behaviour; Virtual Reality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tourism is one of the largest economic sectors in the world. Thus, international tourist arrivals grew 5% in 2018 (UNWTO, 2019). In addition, revenues from international tourism reached 1.7 trillion USD (UNWTO, 2019). In this global context, according to UNWTO (2019), sustainability and competitiveness go hand in hand, as destinations and businesses can become more competitive through the efficient use of resources, the focus on local communities and well-being, and the promotion of biodiversity conservation and actions to tackle climate change.

Previous research has demonstrated that sustainable tourism has special relevance to the development of rural tourism. The role of tourism in rural development can help to sustain and improve the quality of life in rural areas.

Just as the tourism sector is affected more than others by the current COVID-19 pandemic, developing countries are among the hardest hit. Thus, developing countries will need post-COVID-19 assistance to develop sustainable strategies to compete in the global market. As the pandemic impacts heavily on the tourism industry, those disadvantaged communities will be affected first and most severely.

This Special Issue aims to reach a better understanding of the importance of formulating sustainable strategies in rural tourism, and how these strategies can contribute to the local economy in developing countries—especially in the new post-COVID-19 scenario.

This Special Issue will therefore provide an opportunity for contributors from the broad fields of business, economics, marketing, international business and management to present their work. Contributions from Africa, Central and South America, and Asia are especially welcome. The following themes would be of particular interest (the list is not exhaustive):

  • How principles of sustainability can be translated into practice by the implementation of regional sustainable tourism strategies.
  • Information communication technologies and the potential for sustainable development and rural tourism.
  • Virtual reality and its potential application in sustainable development and rural tourism.
  • The role of cooperation and community tourism among rural areas to improve sustainability.
  • How interactive relations between community livelihoods and rural tourism development contribute to sustainability.
  • The role of entrepreneurship in rural tourism for sustainable development.
  • Geotourism and rural tourism.
  • Influence of sustainable development on tourists’ emotions.
  • Gender, rural tourism, and sustainability.
  • E-learning and stimulus packages necessary to compete in the global market.

Prof. Dr. Sergio Moreno-Gil
Dr. Arminda Almeida Santana
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rural tourism
  • sustainability
  • technologies
  • strategies
  • local economy
  • developing countries
  • emotions
  • governance
  • biometric analysis

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 298 KiB  
Article
Does Buddhist Tourism Successfully Result in Local Sustainable Development?
by Yugang He and Chunlei Wang
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3584; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063584 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1833
Abstract
At nine of China’s most well-known Buddhist attractions, the role of Buddhist tourism is examined in terms of two major pillars of local sustainable development, which include local economic growth and local environmental quality. Using the year and city-fixed effect models, and by [...] Read more.
At nine of China’s most well-known Buddhist attractions, the role of Buddhist tourism is examined in terms of two major pillars of local sustainable development, which include local economic growth and local environmental quality. Using the year and city-fixed effect models, and by employing the panel data over the period 2010–2019, we performed an empirical analysis in this investigation. The empirical results suggest that Buddhist tourism positively affects local economic growth. Specifically, a 1% increase in Buddhist tourism results in a 0.053% increase in local economic growth. On the contrary, the empirical results suggest that Buddhist tourism negatively affects local environmental quality. Concretely, a 1% increase in Buddhist tourism leads to a 0.089% decline in local environmental quality. Furthermore, using the number of Buddhist tourists that arrived to replace the total Buddhist tourism revenue to re-estimate the effects of Buddhist tourism on local sustainable development as a robustness test, the new results support the previous results. Meanwhile, other factor with significant impacts on local sustainable development have been found. To conclude, because local economic growth and local environmental conservation are mutually exclusive, which limits local sustainable development, this paper provides evidence for local policymakers to realize local sustainable development from the perspective of Buddhist tourism. Full article
20 pages, 688 KiB  
Article
How Does Sustainable Rural Tourism Cause Rural Community Development?
by Yugang He, Xiaodan Gao, Renhong Wu, Yinhui Wang and Baek-Ryul Choi
Sustainability 2021, 13(24), 13516; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132413516 - 7 Dec 2021
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 4959
Abstract
Rural tourism has been developing vigorously, and rural community functions are becoming diversified in China. Therefore, this paper takes China as an example to explore how sustainable rural tourism affects rural community development in the long and short run over the period 1994–2020. [...] Read more.
Rural tourism has been developing vigorously, and rural community functions are becoming diversified in China. Therefore, this paper takes China as an example to explore how sustainable rural tourism affects rural community development in the long and short run over the period 1994–2020. Sustainable rural tourism can be measured using two indicators: total rural tourism revenue and number of rural tourists. Rural community development is measured by the number of rural community service institutions. Then, by incorporating other variables and using the autoregressive distributed lag bounds co-integration technique to perform an empirical analysis, we found that, whether in the long or short run, sustainable rural tourism always plays a positive and significant role in promoting rural community development. In particular, in the long run, rural infrastructure construction, rural ecological environment, agricultural fiscal expenditure, agricultural technological progress, and rural human capital are identified as the major forces behind rural community development. Meanwhile, in the short run, rural infrastructure construction, rural ecological environment, agricultural fiscal expenditure, agricultural technological progress, and rural human capital are also major drivers of rural community development. This paper contributes to the current literature by filling in the existing gaps in several aspects. Full article
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16 pages, 310 KiB  
Article
Rural Tourism: Does It Matter for Sustainable Farmers’ Income?
by Yugang He, Jingnan Wang, Xiaodan Gao, Yinhui Wang and Baek Ryul Choi
Sustainability 2021, 13(18), 10440; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131810440 - 18 Sep 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2818
Abstract
With the continuous promotion of China’s new rural construction, rural tourism is considered to be an important driving force to promote the sustainable development of rural economy. Sustainable farmers’ income is a major part of the sustainable development of rural economy. Therefore, this [...] Read more.
With the continuous promotion of China’s new rural construction, rural tourism is considered to be an important driving force to promote the sustainable development of rural economy. Sustainable farmers’ income is a major part of the sustainable development of rural economy. Therefore, this paper attempts to explore the effect of rural tourism on sustainable farmers’ income. Using China’s provincial panel data over the period of 2003 to 2020 and employing the mediation effect model to perform empirical analysis, four results are obtained: (1) rural tourism positively and significantly affects sustainable farmers’ income. However, among five kinds of farmers’ income, the coefficients in magnitude are different. (2) A mediation effect of rural ecological environment on the relationship between rural tourism and sustainable farmers’ income exists. (3) A mediation effect of urbanization on the relationship between rural tourism and sustainable farmers’ income also exists. (4) On the whole, the mediation effect of rural ecological environment on the relationship between rural tourism and sustainable farmers’ income is less than that of the mediation effect of urbanization. Based on the evidence this paper provides, corresponding suggestions are raised to promote sustainable farmers’ income. Full article
19 pages, 618 KiB  
Article
Evaluating Residents’ Perceptions of Nature-Based Tourism with a Factor-Cluster Approach
by Xiaoping Gu, Carter A. Hunt, Michael L. Lengieza, Lijun Niu, Huiwen Wu, Yue Wang and Xiang Jia
Sustainability 2021, 13(1), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13010199 - 28 Dec 2020
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 4187
Abstract
The purpose of the research presented here was to empirically assess resident perceptions of tourism development around the Changbai Mountain Biosphere Reserve (CMBR), a protected area straddling the China and North Korea border. Several theoretical approaches to the assessment of local resident attitudes [...] Read more.
The purpose of the research presented here was to empirically assess resident perceptions of tourism development around the Changbai Mountain Biosphere Reserve (CMBR), a protected area straddling the China and North Korea border. Several theoretical approaches to the assessment of local resident attitudes towards tourism were reviewed and integrated into a novel factor-cluster assessment of residents in Erdaobaihe, the community most adjacent to CMBR. This analysis quantitatively grouped residents based on their perceptions of tourism’s economic, social, cultural, and environmental consequences for the town. An exploratory factor analysis of resident perceptual items first revealed six perception domains, and a subsequent cluster analysis then identified four distinct groups of residents based on these perceptions. A descriptive profile of each cluster and the significant differences among clusters are provided. Advancing our theoretical understanding of resident perspectives of tourism development, this cluster-based segmentation approach, demonstrated here, holds much promise for elaborating on the many ways that residents respond to new and long-standing forms of tourism in their communities. These theoretical and methodological contributions will be applicable to scholars as well as tourism practitioners and policy makers. Full article
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