Special Issue "Pandemic and the City: Urban Issues in the Context of COVID-19"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Geography and Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. John Rennie Short
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Policy, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA
Interests: pandemic; COVID-19; new urban forms; cities; viral cities
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of COVID-19 is immense. This special issue seeks to generate discussion on its urban impacts. We seek contributions that look at the short- and long-term effects. In the short-term, cities have slowed down while distancing has changed the look and experience of urban living. Over the longer term, the pandemic raises important issues of future forms including but not limited to:  public spaces, transportation, social difference as the virus reveals new and entrenched inequalities, precarity, issues of data collection, surveillance, and cities and connectivity. The issue will also look for papers on how this pandemic compares and contrasts with pandemics in cities of the past.

Prof. John Rennie Short
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pandemic,
  • COVID-19,
  • New urban forms,
  • cities,
  • viral cities.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Local Community Experience as an Anchor Sustaining Reorientation Processes during COVID-19 Pandemic
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4385; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084385 - 14 Apr 2021
Viewed by 455
Abstract
In recent months, Italian citizens have alternatively experienced a forced, total or partial, loss of their opportunities to go out and meet their social network or their reduction, according to the restrictions locally needed to contain the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak. The [...] Read more.
In recent months, Italian citizens have alternatively experienced a forced, total or partial, loss of their opportunities to go out and meet their social network or their reduction, according to the restrictions locally needed to contain the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak. The effects of these unprecedented circumstances and restrictions on their local community experience are still to be deepened. Consequently, this study investigated young citizens’ experiences of and attitudes towards their local communities of belonging after ten months of alternatively strict and partially eased restrictions. The World Café methodology was used to favor the exchange of ideas and open new viewpoints among participants. What emerged suggests that the communities of belonging may have worked as anchors to which young citizens clung as an attempt not to be overwhelmed by the disorientation brought about by the loss of their daily life (e.g., routines, life places, face-to-face sociability). On the one hand, this suggests that a renewed focus on local communities and a more involved way of living in them may stem from this tough time. On the other hand, these results point out the need for more meaningful and actively engaged people–community relationships as drivers for recovery processes under emergency circumstances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pandemic and the City: Urban Issues in the Context of COVID-19)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Pandemic City: Urban Issues in the Time of COVID-19
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3295; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063295 - 17 Mar 2021
Viewed by 668
Abstract
Pandemics have shaped the way cities are planned and configured. Throughout history, cities have evolved to solve problems of sanitation, hygiene, and health access while providing space and opportunities for the urban dwellers. COVID-19 will have significant implications in the way cities are [...] Read more.
Pandemics have shaped the way cities are planned and configured. Throughout history, cities have evolved to solve problems of sanitation, hygiene, and health access while providing space and opportunities for the urban dwellers. COVID-19 will have significant implications in the way cities are planned. This recent crisis highlights a number of issues. This paper looks at the context for the pandemic and then reviews studies and debates in four areas: transformations in the configuration of public spaces, transportation, urban connectivities, and urban economies. This pandemic, like other similar episodes in the past, is forcing us to rethink the nature of urban space and may be an opportunity to plan for safer, more sustainable cities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pandemic and the City: Urban Issues in the Context of COVID-19)
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