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Natural Resource Management Towards Sustainability

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 13445

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Geography, University of Eatern Finland, 80100 Joensuu, Finland
Interests: governance generating networks, benefit sharing, corporate social responsibility, extractive industries, Arctic sustainable development, indigenous peoples, governance of natural resources, local community resilience
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Guest Editor
Department of Geographical and Historical Studies, University of Eastern Finland, 80101 Joensuu , Finland
Interests: politics of natural resources,local communities and resource extraction

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Law, University of Lapland, 96300 Rovaniemi, Finland
Interests: oil-dependent communities: oil rent and benefit sharing

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Guest Editor
Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE), FI-00790 Helsinki, Finland
Interests: environmental law; biodiversity; biodiversity offsets; forest regulation; participation

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Guest Editor
Faculty of International Relations and Politics, North-West Institute of Management, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, 194044 St. Petersburg, Russia
Interests: sustainable development, arctic research, legal anthropology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The questions about the management of natural resources have become particularly intriguing worldwide political and social issues with the rapidly growing attention on climate change and loss of global biodiversity. To tackle these challenging issues from a variety of research perspectives, we invite contributions to a Special Issue on the sustainability of natural resource management. We wish to explore different aspects of sustainability, including studies on different political and legal frameworks for sustainability in natural resource management as well as research on societal debates on who designs the principles and practices for such frameworks. We are interested in different aspects of sustainability in natural resource management; however, our priority is to focus on the following themes:

  • The role of civil society in resource management. We invite papers on campaigns by NGOs for fostering sustainability and working for a cleaner environment, reducing the carbon footprint, providing alternative solutions to environmental problems, as well as on the role of NGOs in nature preservation.
  • Eco-villages as an example of implementations of sustainability on the ground.
  • Private authority in the governance of natural resources: certification schemes, such as FSC, PEFC, MSC, ASC, as well as soft laws and regulations and company-community partnerships aiming at increased sustainability.
  • Law and society issues, including but not limited to a legal approach to investments.
  • Local communities’ adaptation to climate change in Northern Regions.

We invite academic papers from both social and natural scientists, learned representatives of non-governmental organizations, and experts in environmental management.

Dr. Maria Tysiachniouk
Prof. Dr. Juha Kotilainen
Prof. Dr. Soili Nysten-Haarala
Dr. Minna Pappila
Dr. Svetlana Tulaeva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 564 KiB  
Article
Marine Stewardship Council Certification in Finland and Russia: Global Standards and Local Practices
by Svetlana Tulaeva, Maria Tysiachniouk, Minna Pappila and Minni Tynkkynen
Sustainability 2023, 15(5), 4063; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15054063 - 23 Feb 2023
Viewed by 2224
Abstract
The state of seafood resources around the world has been declining for the last 50 years. There are multiple global, regional, and national regulatory arrangements that make an effort to revert this situation. The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) is a voluntary global instrument, [...] Read more.
The state of seafood resources around the world has been declining for the last 50 years. There are multiple global, regional, and national regulatory arrangements that make an effort to revert this situation. The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) is a voluntary global instrument, believed to foster sustainability in commercial fishing practices. This paper analyzes the institutionalization of MSC in Finland and Russia, and highlights how MSC as a global standard adapts to the different local contexts. It also shows which other global regulatory arrangements contribute to regulating fish production and what are the specifics of interaction between them. For the analysis of the MSC scheme, this paper uses the governance generating network (GGN) theory, which has been widely applied to the research on the FSC forest certification scheme and oil sector. The GGN lens helps to analyze the generative capacity of multiple global regulatory instruments including MSC in the Baltic Sea (Finland) and the Barents Sea (Russia). Qualitative methodology, such as semi-structured interviews with the same interview guide, document analysis, and participant observations were used in both Finland and Russia. We show that several GGNs are contributing to fishing regulations, e.g., the implementation of MSC in both countries is facilitated by multiple international organizations and conventions, which were signed prior to the creation of the MSC scheme. The limited added value of MSC certification is observed in both Finland and Russia: MSC ensures economic stability of certified companies and contributes to biodiversity conservation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management Towards Sustainability)
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29 pages, 6288 KiB  
Article
Traditional Livelihood, Unstable Environment: Adaptation of Traditional Fishing and Reindeer Herding to Environmental Change in the Russian Arctic
by Arsenii Konnov, Yana Khmelnitskaya, Maria Dugina, Tatiana Borzenko and Maria S. Tysiachniouk
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12640; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912640 - 5 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2073
Abstract
The effects of climate change are much more pronounced in the Arctic region than in other places around the world. This paper highlights the practices of adaptation to climate change by Indigenous reindeer herders, e.g., Saami and Komi-Izhemtsy, and Pomor fishermen, in the [...] Read more.
The effects of climate change are much more pronounced in the Arctic region than in other places around the world. This paper highlights the practices of adaptation to climate change by Indigenous reindeer herders, e.g., Saami and Komi-Izhemtsy, and Pomor fishermen, in the Russian Arctic. Our major research question is: How does the interplay of social and environmental factors determine traditional reindeer herding and fishing in the Russian North in the context of climate change, including seasonal changes? A qualitative methodology was used in both reindeer herding and fishing communities using the same interview guide. As an analytical lens, we chose resilience theory combined with the actor–network theory. Resilience theory allows us to situate the adaptive capacity of reindeer herders and fisherman within a constantly changing context. The actor–network theory offers a non-human-centered framework which allows the reconstruction of the networks that emerge in the context of adaptation and link humans, material objects, and the living environment. We found that the traditional economic activity of reindeer herders and fishermen is significantly affected by socio-economic and environmental factors. Both reindeer herders and fishermen manage to adapt to the changing environment using local knowledge and different kinds of technical tools. However, socio-economic conditions and accelerating climate change put the resilience of Indigenous communities at risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management Towards Sustainability)
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17 pages, 3926 KiB  
Article
Diagnosis and Customs Revealed by Peasants and Shepherds during the Transhumant Grazing of Pastoreña Goats in the Mixteca of Oaxaca, Mexico
by José Carlos López-Ojeda, Jacinto Efrén Ramírez-Bribiesca, Ladislao Arias-Margarito, Sergio Iban Mendoza-Pedroza, José Guadalupe Herrera-Haro, Juan Ignacio Váldez-Hernández and Oscar Ortiz-Morales
Sustainability 2022, 14(18), 11171; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141811171 - 6 Sep 2022
Viewed by 1527
Abstract
Transhumant pastoralism is a livelihood for many smallholders in the world. In Mexico, transhumant pastoralism has been practiced for 500 years and is classified as a system of transhumant goat pastoralism (TGP). The focus of the study was to identify and characterize the [...] Read more.
Transhumant pastoralism is a livelihood for many smallholders in the world. In Mexico, transhumant pastoralism has been practiced for 500 years and is classified as a system of transhumant goat pastoralism (TGP). The focus of the study was to identify and characterize the main goat herders of transhumance in the Mixteca-Baja of Mexico. The investigation was carried out in two phases: The first included exploring the districts to locate, contact, and live with the people involved, 13 peasants named Patrones ranging from 40 to 76 years of age. The second phase investigated the transhumant routes and the zootechnical activities of the herds. They live in five locations with an inventory of 12 thousand goats known as Pastoreñas. The TGP is a primary economic activity for all the people, and La Matanza is the main economic activity consisting of the slaughter and marketing of goats. The study revealed that the activities depend on the type of economic unit. Transhumant Pastoreña goats garner the highest prices paid by merchants ranging from 47–70.4 USD per goat. In conclusion, the TGP is an interesting production system, and livestock activity has an essential ecological niche combining income generation and conservation of the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management Towards Sustainability)
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28 pages, 1844 KiB  
Article
Intentional Communities Finding Space Amid Geopolitical Turmoil: Belbek Valley Case Study
by Maria S. Tysiachniouk and Juha Kotilainen
Sustainability 2022, 14(18), 11138; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141811138 - 6 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1670
Abstract
The authoritarian regime in Russia represents a political context of societal turmoil in which the challenges for building sustainability can be studied. We explore intentional communities (ICs) with an environmental component that often appear with a focus on other issues such as spirituality [...] Read more.
The authoritarian regime in Russia represents a political context of societal turmoil in which the challenges for building sustainability can be studied. We explore intentional communities (ICs) with an environmental component that often appear with a focus on other issues such as spirituality and culture. Our focus is on Crimea’s Belbek Valley, a contested space that has nevertheless become attractive for ICs. We use semi-structured and open-ended interviews to collect data, which we analyze thematically. We discuss the reasons for the emergence of the ICs in the Belbek Valley and the variety of different ICs and initiatives there and build a typology of the ICs. They stand in stark contrast with neighboring traditional villages in Crimea. The Belbek Valley’s ICs are small-scale alternatives to the mainstream lifestyle, and they aim for a low carbon footprint, practicing permaculture, the application of energy and water saving technologies, vegetarianism, and yoga. The number of environmental practices adopted by each IC depends on the scale of their activities and investments in the infrastructure. We conclude by emphasizing the paradoxical nature of the Belbek Valley becoming a hub for ICs seeking long-term sustainability amid geopolitical turmoil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management Towards Sustainability)
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15 pages, 279 KiB  
Article
The Role of MSC Marine Certification in Fisheries Governance in Finland
by Minna Pappila and Minni Tynkkynen
Sustainability 2022, 14(12), 7178; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14127178 - 11 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1686
Abstract
Finnish fisheries are regulated first and foremost by the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and quotas determined by the EU. Certain fisheries have also been certified according to the international Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard. The aim of this article is to study [...] Read more.
Finnish fisheries are regulated first and foremost by the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and quotas determined by the EU. Certain fisheries have also been certified according to the international Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard. The aim of this article is to study the added value that the MSC brings to the governance of the ecological sustainability of Finnish marine fisheries. This is achieved by scrutinizing how the MSC addresses the ecosystem approach and how different experts and stakeholders see the role of the MSC in contributing to sustainable fisheries. We endeavor to unravel the sustainability benefits that non-state regulations can offer for a fishery in the Baltic Sea that is heavily regulated and controlled by the EU. We found that the MSC has led to some minor positive changes in fishing and that the indirect support the MSC provides when following scientific advice is even more important. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management Towards Sustainability)

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20 pages, 703 KiB  
Systematic Review
Systematic Literature Review on Methods of Assessing Carrying Capacity in Recreation and Tourism Destinations
by Zamru Ajuhari, Azlizam Aziz, Sam Shor Nahar Yaakob, Shamsul Abu Bakar and Manohar Mariapan
Sustainability 2023, 15(4), 3474; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15043474 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3341
Abstract
Carrying capacity is paramount to recreation and tourism management, which depends on sustainability between resource protection and experience quality. Many studies have examined carrying capacity from several perspectives, but the various methods of assessing carrying capacity have not yet been reviewed. The purpose [...] Read more.
Carrying capacity is paramount to recreation and tourism management, which depends on sustainability between resource protection and experience quality. Many studies have examined carrying capacity from several perspectives, but the various methods of assessing carrying capacity have not yet been reviewed. The purpose of this study is to assess the methods of carrying capacity, their trend, and the assessment of carrying capacity made by each method. From the three scientific repositories used in this research, 100 original research papers were included in the review process. A total of 24 methods were recorded. The normative approach and Cifuentes Arias’ method were found to be the two main methods of determining carrying capacity. From the assessment of carrying capacity and the origin of each method, two fundamentals of carrying capacity emerged, and their differences and limitations are discussed. In addition, the study found that the carrying capacity employed in tourism destinations was formulated by complex variables that may require political interventions to ensure their success. Most of the research reviewed here focuses on the social aspects of carrying capacity, thus leaving room for future research. This study should benefit academics, policymakers, and resource managers by comprehensively analyzing the methods, limitations, and directions of future research in carrying capacity studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Resource Management Towards Sustainability)
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