Special Issue "Economic Impacts of Energy and Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Human Geography and Social Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. George Halkos
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Operations Research, Department of Economics, University of Thessaly, 28hs Octovriou 78, Volos 383 33, Greece
Interests: applied statistics and econometrics; simulations of economic modelling; environmental economics; applied micro-economic with emphasis in welfare economics; air pollution; game theory; mathematical models (non-linear programming)
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a vast body of literature examining the main drivers of sustainability. Obviously, the economic effects of energy and climate change mitigation and adaptation play a substantial role in any policy planning and effective management towards sustainability. Climate change involves many dimensions—scientific, economic, societal, and political, and it is a global problem, realized on local scales that will persist for many decades or even centuries. Although we are aware of climate change dimensions and problems, greenhouse gases (GHG) keep on growing. Apart from the agreements on facing and tackling the problem, a substantial response to climate change requires a joint approach of mitigation in reducing GHG emissions and aiming to stabilize the levels of heat-trapping GHGs into the atmosphere as well as adaptation to climate change that already exists. Although climate change is a global problem, it is also considered on a local scale, with cities and municipalities on the cutting edge of adaptation. In this Special Issue, we are seeking to address research questions including but not limited to costs and modelling of climate-change impacts, adaptation in the developed and developing world, the promotion of effective international technology cooperation, emissions from transport, progress in national adaptation planning, adaptation, innovation in climate change mitigation, progress in national adaptation planning, and assessment of climate change effects on a city (and port) scale.

Prof. Dr. George Halkos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adaptation
  • mitigation
  • climate change
  • national planning
  • risk management
  • economic effects
  • energy

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Global Emission Taxes and Port Privatization Policies under International Competition
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6595; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166595 - 14 Aug 2020
Abstract
This study considers two asymmetric ports under international competition in which each country has a hub port and a private manufacturer and investigates strategic interactions between port privatization and emission tax policies. We emphasize the key role of the relative market size between [...] Read more.
This study considers two asymmetric ports under international competition in which each country has a hub port and a private manufacturer and investigates strategic interactions between port privatization and emission tax policies. We emphasize the key role of the relative market size between the two countries and show that in a privatization choice game, port privatization is a dominant strategy in a larger country, but it will be chosen by a smaller country only if its relative market size is not so small. We also show that the coordination of global emission taxes before privatization choices can induce the equilibrium of the game to be globally optimal when the emission tax is relatively high. This finding provides an important policy implication on the climate change that coordinated global environmental policy is imperatively required in the port privatization policy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Spatial Heterogeneity of the Carbon Emission Effect Resulting from Urban Expansion among Three Coastal Agglomerations in China
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4590; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174590 - 23 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Land-use change, particularly urban expansion, can greatly affect the carbon balance, both from the aspects of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic carbon emissions. Coastal China is a typical region of rapid urban expansion, and obvious spatial heterogeneity exists from the north to south. However, [...] Read more.
Land-use change, particularly urban expansion, can greatly affect the carbon balance, both from the aspects of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic carbon emissions. Coastal China is a typical region of rapid urban expansion, and obvious spatial heterogeneity exists from the north to south. However, the different urban change characteristics and the effect on carbon balance remain undetermined. By unifying the spatial-temporal resolution of carbon source and sink data, we effectively compared the carbon budgets of three coastal urban agglomerations in China. The results show that all of the three urban agglomerations have undergone an obvious urban expansion process, with the built-up area increasing from 1.03 × 104 km2 in 2000 to 3.06 × 104 km2 in 2013. For Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei (BTH), the built-up area gradually expanded. The built-up area in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) gradually changed before 2007 but rapidly grew thereafter. The built-up expansion of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) passed through three growing stages and showed the largest mean patch size. Carbon emission spatial patterns in the three urban agglomerations are consistent with their economic development, from which the net ecosystem production (NEP) spatial patterns are very different. Compared to carbon emissions, NEP has a carbon sink effect and can absorb some carbon emissions, but the amounts were all much lower than the carbon emissions in the three urban agglomerations. The carbon sink effect in the Yangtze River Delta is the most obvious, with the Pearl River Delta following, and the lowest effect is in Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei. Finally, a scientific basis for policy-making is provided for viable CO2 emission mitigation policies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Perceived Livelihood Risk on Livelihood Strategies: A Case Study in Shiyang River Basin, China
Sustainability 2019, 11(12), 3349; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11123349 - 17 Jun 2019
Abstract
Using data collected from semi-structured interviews with 485 households, this research evaluates the effect of perceived livelihood risk on livelihood strategies within farming households in China’s Shiyang River Basin. Perceived livelihood risk was evaluated by establishing an index system of livelihood risk (health, [...] Read more.
Using data collected from semi-structured interviews with 485 households, this research evaluates the effect of perceived livelihood risk on livelihood strategies within farming households in China’s Shiyang River Basin. Perceived livelihood risk was evaluated by establishing an index system of livelihood risk (health, environmental, financial, social, and information and connectivity risks). Different livelihood strategies were identified, including reducing consumption, seeking help from relatives and friends, securing loans, seeking employment, and converting assets into cash. The effect of perceived livelihood risk on livelihood strategies was measured and evaluated using multinomial logistic regression. The results indicate that the effect of different perceived livelihood risk on livelihood strategies varies. Personality traits, as well as perceived health risk, financial risk, social risk, and environmental risk influence livelihood strategies, while perceived information risk and connectivity risk do not appear to have obvious relationships to livelihood strategies. Finally, we present proposals for ensuring farmers’ livelihood strategies are more effective. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Small & Medium-Sized Enterprises, Organizational Resilience Capacity and Flash Floods: Insights from a Literature Review
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7437; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187437 - 10 Sep 2020
Abstract
From a managerial standpoint, sustainability poses numerous challenges for the business community. One of the prominent concerns in the context of organizational sustainability is the impact of climate change and extreme weather events (EWEs), which create discontinuity and damages to business operations. In [...] Read more.
From a managerial standpoint, sustainability poses numerous challenges for the business community. One of the prominent concerns in the context of organizational sustainability is the impact of climate change and extreme weather events (EWEs), which create discontinuity and damages to business operations. In this respect, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are particularly vulnerable to EWEs, such as flash floods, having disastrous consequences to SMEs that tend to be ill-prepared. Taking into consideration that these negatives effects are also transferred into the local communities in which SMEs are located, it is crucial to create appropriate mechanisms that will enable these enterprises to build relevant capacities and acquire necessary resources in order to deal with relevant disruptive events. With this in mind, this paper attempts to delineate the emerging literature in relation to strategic approaches in dealing with high impact/low probability EWEs. With this analysis, we aim to provide insights for enhancing the robustness of SMEs against such natural hazards through effective resilience and adaptation strategies. The paper reveals that resilience to EWEs is indeed a multifaceted issue posing numerous challenges to SMEs. Taking into account their intrinsic characteristics, there is a need for a holistic management approach that will assist SMEs to safeguard their assets against extreme weather. Full article
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