Special Issue "Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic, Business and Management Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (17 September 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Federico Frattini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics and Management, University of Ferrara, Italy
Tel. +39 0532 455081
Interests: development economics; economic geography; technological dynamics; public policy
Dr. Francesco Nicolli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Florence School of Regulation, European University Institute, Italy
Tel. +39-055-4685668
Interests: environmental economics; economics of eco-innovation; industrial dynamics; applied econometrics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Globalization has caused people, businesses, and institutions to become more tightly interconnected. Economic prosperity and decay have grown to habit much closer one another than in the past, even in surrounding regions or cities. Prosperity critically depends on the success in value creation and a sustainable engagement in value chains, which rely, in turn, on local capabilities to innovate and maintain pace with changes. The agglomeration of these capabilities, their fulfillment in business, the development of local industrial ecosystems, private and/or public initiatives to support change from within, and the emerging linkages/complementarities between regions and communities, all contribute to incessantly mold the geography of the global economy. This Special Issue aims to collect papers that contribute to the literature with intuitions and evidence of the dynamics of sustainable development within and between regions. Sustainability is intended in wide terms, that is, environmental, economic, and social. Papers are expected to investigate one or more of the aspects of local/regional value creation in the global economy, with no limitations to the methodologies applied at a micro, meso, or macro level, and serve as inspiration for practitioners, managers, and policy makers. Some example topics are, among others: Technical change, innovation, and industrial renewal; industrial development, cohesion, and global dynamics; regional advantages, business location decisions, and value chains; place-based policies to support innovation and sustainability; eco-innovation and regional competitiveness; and transitional communities, regions, and systems.

Dr. Federico Frattini
Dr. Francesco Nicolli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • capabilities
  • cluster
  • cohesion
  • globalization
  • industrial ecosystem
  • innovation
  • public policy
  • regional development
  • technical change
  • value chain

Published Papers (18 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Carbon Footprint as a Lever for Sustained Competitive Strategy in Developing a Smart Oenology: Evidence from an Exploratory Study in Italy
Sustainability 2019, 11(5), 1483; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11051483 - 11 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
In the wine sector, the choice of a sustainable strategy based on smart marketing has gained more relevance due to the growing importance of sustainability. The literature illustrates a multiplicity of perspectives, wherever firms are committed to improving sustainability and market performance. This [...] Read more.
In the wine sector, the choice of a sustainable strategy based on smart marketing has gained more relevance due to the growing importance of sustainability. The literature illustrates a multiplicity of perspectives, wherever firms are committed to improving sustainability and market performance. This exploratory paper aims to make sense of the extant literature by analysing 10 case studies in Italy, focusing on sustainable competitive resources and strategies, considering the role of CF (Carbon Footprint) as a crucial factor. The research has considered a complementary theoretical framework based on both Resource-Based Theory and Competitive Advantage Theory. Data were analysed by descriptive statistical techniques. The results show a bundle of unique resources and strategies in pursuing firm performance, wherever CF may lead to significant sustained competitive advantages in firms’ value capture (ex. image and reputation and customers’ relationships loyalty, entrance into new foreign markets). Findings highlight that perceiving the costs and benefits of investments in lowering CF may guide to a more accurate understanding of the value-creating from the different type of eco-innovation for building tailor-made communicational and marketing strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Revising Emission Responsibilities through Consumption-Based Accounting: A European and Post-Brexit Perspective
Sustainability 2019, 11(2), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11020488 - 17 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
International trade shifts production of a large amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions embodied in traded goods from the importing country to the exporting country. The European Union (EU) plays a prominent role in the flow of international-related emissions as it [...] Read more.
International trade shifts production of a large amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions embodied in traded goods from the importing country to the exporting country. The European Union (EU) plays a prominent role in the flow of international-related emissions as it accounts for the second largest share of global exports and imports of goods. Consumption-based accountings (CBA) emerged as alternative to the traditional emission inventories based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines. According to the IPCC criteria, countries where products are consumed take no responsibility for the emissions produced by exporter countries, thus neglecting the emissions embodied in trade. By taking this aspect into account, CBA are considered of great importance in revealing emissions attributed to the final consumer. Using a CBA approach, this paper evaluates the impact of international trade in the EU in terms of CO2 emissions, looking both at the internal trade flows within the EU-28 and at the external trade flows between the EU and the rest of the world during the period 2012–2015. We find that the EU is a net importer of emissions as its emissions due to consumption exceed those due to production. In particular, in 2015 the ratio between import- and export-embodied emissions was more than 3:1 for the EU-28 that imported 1317 Mt CO2 from the rest of the world (mainly from China and Russia) while exporting only 424 Mt CO2. Concerning emissions flows among EU countries, Germany represents the largest importer, followed by the UK. To get a deeper understanding on possible environmental implications of Brexit on UK emission responsibilities, the paper also advances a few hypotheses on how trade flows could change based on the existing trade patterns of the UK. Data analysis shows that a 10% shift of UK imports from EU partners to its main non-EU trading partners (India, China, and US) would increase its emission responsibility by 5%. The increase in UK emission responsibility would more than double (+11%) in case of a 30% shift of UK imports. Similar results would apply if UK replaced its current EU partners with its main Commonwealth trading partners as a result of Brexit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Spatiotemporal Variation and Inequality in China’s Economic Resilience across Cities and Urban Agglomerations
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4754; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124754 - 13 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Economic resilience is a critical indicator of the sustainable development of an urban economy. This paper measures the urban economic resilience (UER) of 286 major cities in China from six indicators—economic growth, opening up, social development, environmental protection, natural conditions, and technological innovation—using [...] Read more.
Economic resilience is a critical indicator of the sustainable development of an urban economy. This paper measures the urban economic resilience (UER) of 286 major cities in China from six indicators—economic growth, opening up, social development, environmental protection, natural conditions, and technological innovation—using a subjective and objective weighting method and the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) methods. Furthermore, kernel density estimation (KDE) was used to reveal the spatial and temporal trends in UER across cities, and a social opportunity function was applied to access the opportunity for economic resilience and the fairness of opportunities for economic resilience in 19 urban agglomerations in China. The results show that the UER was, in general, low across all cities but increased over time. Geographically, the UER disperses from the eastern coast to inland cities. Amongst urban agglomerations in China, the economic resilience opportunity index also varies spatially and increases over time. On the other hand, the opportunity fairness index of UER remained largely stable and substantial inequalities exist across all urban agglomerations, indicating the need for differentiated policy intervention to ensure equality and the sustainable development of the region. The methodology developed in this research can also be applied in other cities and regions to test its re-applicability and to understand the UER in different contexts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
International R&D Spillovers and Innovation Efficiency
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3974; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113974 - 31 Oct 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
The objective of this study is to examine the impact of international research and development (R&D) spillovers on innovation efficiency of specific R&D outcomes, employing the country-level panel data for 44 countries in the 1996–2013 period. Fully considering the heterogeneity of different R&D [...] Read more.
The objective of this study is to examine the impact of international research and development (R&D) spillovers on innovation efficiency of specific R&D outcomes, employing the country-level panel data for 44 countries in the 1996–2013 period. Fully considering the heterogeneity of different R&D outputs, scientific papers, PCT (Patent Cooperation Treaty) patents, US patents, and domestic patents are observed separately, which enriches the angles of measuring international R&D spillovers. By applying a stochastic frontier analysis to knowledge production function, we find that foreign R&D capital stock positively contributes to the innovation efficiency of scientific papers, but suppresses the productivity of domestic patents, whereas it does not really matter for PCT or US patents. These results are robust to control for a set of institutional factors and also in sensitivity analyses. Hence, dependence on international R&D spillovers seems neither to be the right way for emerging economies to catch up, nor to be a sustainable model for developing countries to fill the technical gap. Local R&D capital stock, instead, keeps an essential contributor to all four R&D outputs, so raising internal R&D expenditure is actually the key to improving innovation level and sustainable development ability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Open AccessArticle
Inclusive Growth in CEE Countries as a Determinant of Sustainable Development
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3973; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113973 - 31 Oct 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Pursuant to the concept of inclusive growth, the authors analyze the transition economies of Central and Eastern European countries, which have become EU members (Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia). CEE countries characterized by comparable [...] Read more.
Pursuant to the concept of inclusive growth, the authors analyze the transition economies of Central and Eastern European countries, which have become EU members (Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Slovenia). CEE countries characterized by comparable historic and economic backgrounds now seem to reach diversified stages of development. The objective of the study is to identify the level of inclusive growth among CEE countries by taking into account indicators assigned to its seven pillars. The article’s thesis is that CEE countries represent social and economic heterogeneity as well as varied levels of sustainable development. Research methods included the application of the principal components analysis and the multivariate analysis. For a literature review, the bibliometric analysis was conducted with the visualization prepared by the VOSviewer software. The main findings suggest that Estonia, Slovenia, and the Czech Republic seem to exhibit the highest level of inclusive growth while Bulgaria and Romania represent the lowest level of indicators measured. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Corporate Social Responsibility in Global Supply Chains: Deeds Not Words
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3675; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103675 - 14 Oct 2018
Abstract
The disconnect between the lofty aspirations of firms claiming Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and their shortcomings in practice have caused some observers to question its usefulness. The fallout from events like the Rana Plaza catastrophe has highlighted some of these shortcomings—namely, deficiencies in [...] Read more.
The disconnect between the lofty aspirations of firms claiming Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and their shortcomings in practice have caused some observers to question its usefulness. The fallout from events like the Rana Plaza catastrophe has highlighted some of these shortcomings—namely, deficiencies in how multinational enterprises (MNEs) transact with suppliers in developing countries. Specifically, our paper aims to investigate whether or not MNEs behave hypocritically by examining the alignment of CSR to business practices in MNE affiliates in developing countries. To answer this question, we apply standard ordinary least squares (OLS) techniques to data for over 1000 MNEs that claim to have a CSR ethos. We find that CSR-active enterprises report significantly higher worker wages, ceteris paribus. Local African suppliers benefit from CSR through knowledge transfer, but only when MNEs make tangible investments in supplier development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Innovation and Exporting: A Study on Eastern European Union Firms
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3607; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103607 - 10 Oct 2018
Abstract
This paper investigates how firm-level innovation and productivity affect the export propensity in manufacturing firms in seven Eastern European Union countries. With respect to innovation activities, we analyze the complementarity between pair-wise product, process and non-technological (organizational and marketing) innovations when the objective [...] Read more.
This paper investigates how firm-level innovation and productivity affect the export propensity in manufacturing firms in seven Eastern European Union countries. With respect to innovation activities, we analyze the complementarity between pair-wise product, process and non-technological (organizational and marketing) innovations when the objective function is represented by the exporting probability of a firm. Analyzing CIS2008 data, we find that productivity always has a positive and significant impact on the exporting propensity of firms. Furthermore, complex innovative firms, when large in size and/or from medium high–high technology sectors, can take advantage in terms of a higher attitude to export than non-innovators and simple innovators. By considering these results, governments have to introduce policies that can induce firms, especially small and medium ones, to implement complex innovations. This is fundamental in order to be more productive and more competitive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Immigrant Diversity on Wages. The Spanish Experience
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3312; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093312 - 17 Sep 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The massive waves of migration that have emerged as part of the recent globalization process have attracted increasing attention in the field of economic geography. Traditionally, empirical research on this issue has focused on the possible substitution effect between native and foreign workers [...] Read more.
The massive waves of migration that have emerged as part of the recent globalization process have attracted increasing attention in the field of economic geography. Traditionally, empirical research on this issue has focused on the possible substitution effect between native and foreign workers in the labour market. However, this evaluation omits the potential positive spillovers derived from a greater cultural diversity related to immigration. The aim of this work is to fill this gap by analysing the impact that immigrant diversity has on wages in Spain. To do so, we built three different indexes that measure cultural diversity across the Spanish regions. We control for the problem of potential simultaneity between migration and wages using instrumental variable techniques. We also consider the role of the increasing entry of foreigners coming from developed economies and other local factors. The results confirm that a greater diversity of immigrants’ birthplaces is associated with higher wages for both natives and the total population. Moreover, our findings reveal the importance of skilled labour (national or foreign), to encourage workers’ productivity and to ensure sustainable economic development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Research on Spatial Correlation in Regional Innovation Spillover in China Based on Patents
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3090; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093090 - 30 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Regional innovation is very important for the sustainable development of regional economies. Innovation development between regions is not independent, and there is spatial correlation in innovation spillover. This paper uses the total amount of regional patent authorization as the measure of regional innovation [...] Read more.
Regional innovation is very important for the sustainable development of regional economies. Innovation development between regions is not independent, and there is spatial correlation in innovation spillover. This paper uses the total amount of regional patent authorization as the measure of regional innovation and uses network analysis to study the spatial relationships among different regions. An unstructured vector autoregressive model is established to determine whether there is an association between any two regions, the causal relationship between which is tested by a Granger causality test. Having established the spatial network relationship, network analysis is used to further analyze the overall characteristics of the network, the individual characteristics of the network, and the block model of the network. We find that the provinces are closely related regarding regional innovation spillovers. However, the spatial correlation between the provinces differs greatly. Also, there is an obvious hierarchy between blocks that have different orientations and functions. Finally, the relationship between the interior of each block differs greatly in closeness degree. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Social Capital and Long-Term Regional Development within Poland in the Light of Experimental Economics and Data from a Questionnaire
Sustainability 2018, 10(9), 3000; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10093000 - 23 Aug 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
For some time, researchers have been interested in determinants of long-term growth which are not purely economic in nature. The development of the concept of social capital by sociologists, politologists and economists is a visible effect of this interest. Any determinant of long-term [...] Read more.
For some time, researchers have been interested in determinants of long-term growth which are not purely economic in nature. The development of the concept of social capital by sociologists, politologists and economists is a visible effect of this interest. Any determinant of long-term growth is obviously important from the point of view of sustainability, particularly when its relation to other factors of sustainability, such as environmental protection, is taken into account. This article presents the results of research into spatial variation in social capital within Poland (according to region and size of home town). The authors consider social capital in relation to trust, trustworthiness and, in particular, cooperation, as well as taking into account attitudes regarding legal norms (law-abidingness). Such a wide approach enables us to eliminate the negative aspects of trust and concentrate on its positive forms, which can result in an economic rent. The aim of the article is to identify regions of Poland that are characterized by a high level of social capital from the point of view of individuals exhibiting a willingness to cooperate with others and observe the law and relate these results with the perspectives for long-term growth in Poland. The results of the research are based on a study carried out on a sample of 1540 students using experimental game theory alongside a questionnaire that investigated various aspects of cooperation, trust, trustworthiness and aversion to inequality. The results of the study indicate intuitively reasonable associations between the data from the questionnaire and behaviour in the experimental games suggesting that the declarations are (in statistical terms) meaningful. Analysis indicates that, in Poland, readiness to cooperate tends to be higher in rural areas. Although the study concentrates on the relation between social capital and economic development, it is also argued that high levels of social capital also favour other components of sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Administrative Reform on Labour Market Transformations in Large Polish Cities
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2860; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082860 - 11 Aug 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
The purpose of the article was to discuss the impact of administrative reforms on the dynamics and the direction of changes occurring in the labour market structure of cities. In the existing research the view prevails that the loss of the voivodship capital [...] Read more.
The purpose of the article was to discuss the impact of administrative reforms on the dynamics and the direction of changes occurring in the labour market structure of cities. In the existing research the view prevails that the loss of the voivodship capital function contributes strongly to the socio-economic degradation of the city. In Poland, this discussion has been caused by an administrative reform, as a result of which 49 existing voivodships and the related 49 voivodship capitals were replaced by 16 voivodships and 18 regional capitals. The carried out research focused on both these Polish urban centres which lost their voivodship status and the ones which retained it and become the centres of new, large regions. The Bray-Curtis measure was used to analyse the studied transformations. The data for 2005 and 2016 were used in the research. The conducted study allowed the identification of groups of the cities characterised by a similar range of changes in labour market structure. The research focused on answering the question whether retaining or losing the status of a voivodship city is related to the scale of these changes. The research results presented in the article seem to confirm that the role of administrative changes in the development of cities is not as extensive as it has commonly been attributed. The actual reasons for the economic growth of large centres, or the shrinking of some former voivodship cities, cannot be reduced to the effects of the reform itself. They result, to a much greater extent, from the processes of deindustrialisation, predominantly related to the regression of the declining industry sectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Returns: The Effect of Regional Industrial Development Policy on Institutional Investors’ Behavior in China
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2769; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082769 - 06 Aug 2018
Abstract
Within the market economy system controlled by the Chinese government, this study mainly explores whether government policies can sufficiently guide the investment decisions of professional investors. Thus, we examine whether professional investment institutions can support the government’s policy for long-term investment to produce [...] Read more.
Within the market economy system controlled by the Chinese government, this study mainly explores whether government policies can sufficiently guide the investment decisions of professional investors. Thus, we examine whether professional investment institutions can support the government’s policy for long-term investment to produce sustainable returns and create value for both the country and investment institutions. To perform this test, we use the annual data from firms held by institutional investors and listed in China A-shares to run a panel regression model. We then explore the following three issues: first, we examined whether firm-level characteristics or regional industrial development policy affect the investment behavior of the institutional investors. Second, we investigated whether four types of institutions have different favorite economic regions in China under the regional industrial development policy. Third, we analyzed which type of institutional investor supports the regional industrial development policy. The above four types of institutions are: independent, grey, domestic, and qualified foreign institutions. Empirical results show that both firm-level characteristics and regional industrial development policy can affect the investment behavior of the institutional owners. Of all the firm-level characteristics selected by institutions in China, return on equity (ROE) is the condition most commonly selected for all types of institutions, whereas the dividend yield (DY) is considered only by qualified foreign institutional investors (QFIIs). Notably, both independent and domestic institutions have the same firm selection criteria. As for the institutions’ favorite industries for investment, only grey institutions prefer the power industry and QFIIs prefer manufacturing industry. In addition, all four types of institutional investors have different industrial favorites in the four economic regions in China under the regional industrial development policy. For example, independent institutions prefer the information industry and grey institutions appear to be interested in every industry. Moreover, domestic institutions prefer the manufacturing and information industries, whereas QFIIs prefer the manufacturing industry. Regarding the regional participation of institutions, both domestic institutions and QFIIs seem to focus on every region. Moreover, independent institutions focus on the eastern and western regions, whereas grey institutions only focus on the western region. Finally, domestic institutions received the greatest level of support, followed by grey and independent institutions, whereas the QFIIs receive the least support. Put simply, domestic institutions are deeply engaged in industrial development all over China, whereas QFIIs are only slightly engaged in this development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Research on the Disequilibrium Development of Output of Regional Innovation Based on R&D Personnel
Sustainability 2018, 10(8), 2708; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10082708 - 01 Aug 2018
Abstract
Regional innovation is of great significance to the sustainable development of a regional economy. However, there exists a disequilibrium development of output of regional innovation in China, which affects the imbalance of regional economic development to a certain extent. In order to explore [...] Read more.
Regional innovation is of great significance to the sustainable development of a regional economy. However, there exists a disequilibrium development of output of regional innovation in China, which affects the imbalance of regional economic development to a certain extent. In order to explore the process and mechanism of the disequilibrium development in regional innovation, a new perspective is adopted in this paper to analyze the index of R&D (research and development) personnel, which is an important input element of regional innovation output. The regional samples, including 31 provinces in China, are divided into three parts: eastern region, central region, and western region. First, developing the tendency and speed of the disequilibrium of regional innovation output are analyzed by using σ convergent model and β convergent model, respectively, during the period of analyzing the process of the disequilibrium development. Then, the LMDI (logarithmic mean Divisia index) method is used to analyze the character of regional innovation output by using R&D personnel as an important endogenous factor during the period of analyzing the mechanism of the disequilibrium development. At last, we draw the conclusion of the study. We find that: (i) there is a gap in the absolute amount between regions in a long term, but the gap between regions is shrinking and the speed of catching up between regions is different; (ii) the efficiency of R&D personnel is the most positive effect of promoting equilibrium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Spatial Distribution Pattern of the Headquarters of Listed Firms in China
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2564; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072564 - 22 Jul 2018
Abstract
This study chose 4667 listed firms with headquarters in China as the research objects. The spatial aggregations of headquarters in sub-periods and subsectors were investigated based on prefecture-level cities using Global Moran’s I statistic, the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic, and kernel density estimation. The [...] Read more.
This study chose 4667 listed firms with headquarters in China as the research objects. The spatial aggregations of headquarters in sub-periods and subsectors were investigated based on prefecture-level cities using Global Moran’s I statistic, the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic, and kernel density estimation. The spatial association and frequent patterns of headquarters belonging to different sectors were analyzed using the Apriori algorithm. The results showed the following: (1) Most headquarters of listed firms agglomerate around megacities and concentrate in the coastal regions. (2) Many prefer that headquarters be located in an area within a 5 km radius, forming the pivotal local industry cluster. (3) Industrial, information technology, and consumer discretionary firms show a higher degree of agglomeration than materials and health care firms. Materials and consumer discretionary industries have a stronger spillover effect on surrounding cities compared to industrial, information technology, and health care firms. (4) Service industries show a strong spatial association with other sectors at all distance thresholds and frequent items. These results can provide a reference for future considerations of headquarters locations, industrial development, and the reshaping of urban networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
What Is the Evolution of Convergence in the EU? Decomposing EU Disparities up to NUTS 3 Level
Sustainability 2018, 10(5), 1552; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10051552 - 14 May 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Research on convergence deals with the question of whether regional disparities are decreasing over time. Aiming to decompose EU disparities covering regions of all levels, this paper fills the gap of the empirical research on convergence in the EU in the following ways: [...] Read more.
Research on convergence deals with the question of whether regional disparities are decreasing over time. Aiming to decompose EU disparities covering regions of all levels, this paper fills the gap of the empirical research on convergence in the EU in the following ways: (i) the research updates the assessment of regional disparities in the EU emphasizing, but not limited to, the analysis at the NUTS 3 level; (ii) based on a constructed three-level Theil index, the research decomposes EU disparities into between-country, within-country at the NUTS 2 level, and within the NUTS 2 region at the NUTS 3 level components, covering the period of 1995–2014 and all EU regions, (iii) it examines the linkages between the development of innovation and technology, sustainability, and evolution of disparities. Our main findings suggest that convergence in the EU is still present at different regional levels, but its speed is slowing down. Total EU disparities were decreasing mainly because of reducing disparities between member states. At the same time, in the majority of EU member states, old and new, within-country disparities were growing at all regional levels, and now within-country disparities account for almost two-fifths of total EU disparities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Role of Mimicry Isomorphism in Sustainable Development Operationalisation by SMEs in South Africa
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1264; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041264 - 20 Apr 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
The study surveyed 222 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) from the Limpopo province of South Africa on the impact of mimicry isomorphism in making sustainable development operational. The research made use of self-administered questionnaires which were distributed, and the convenience sampling technique was [...] Read more.
The study surveyed 222 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) from the Limpopo province of South Africa on the impact of mimicry isomorphism in making sustainable development operational. The research made use of self-administered questionnaires which were distributed, and the convenience sampling technique was used. Data analysis primarily comprised of exploratory factor analysis (EFA) through SPSS software version 24 confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modelling (SEM) through AMOS software version 24. The SEM results revealed that all three measured dimensions of sustainable development—namely, economic, environmental, and social—were significantly influenced by mimicry isomorphism. As such, the implications of the study are that strong evidence exists pertaining to the operationalisation of sustainable development due to mimetic isomorphism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A Comprehensive Assessment and Spatial Analysis of Vulnerability of China’s Provincial Economies
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041261 - 19 Apr 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Vulnerability theory is a fundamental scientific knowledge system in sustainable development, and vulnerability assessment is important in vulnerability studies. Economic vulnerability affects economic growth sustainability. Comprehensive assessment of economic vulnerability in the process of economic growth under the theoretical framework of vulnerability will [...] Read more.
Vulnerability theory is a fundamental scientific knowledge system in sustainable development, and vulnerability assessment is important in vulnerability studies. Economic vulnerability affects economic growth sustainability. Comprehensive assessment of economic vulnerability in the process of economic growth under the theoretical framework of vulnerability will provide a new perspective for vulnerability studies. Based on a vulnerability scoping diagram assessment model, this study selected 22 economic sensitivity indexes and 25 economic adaptability indexes from the economic, social, and nature–resource–environmental subsystems to comprehensively assess and spatially analyse the vulnerability of China’s provincial economies since the year 2000, while applying the entropy method, multilevel extension assessment, spatial measurement method, and geographic information system technology. The results showed the following: (1) There are great differences in the vulnerability of China’s provincial economies. Western China’s vulnerability is higher and the fluctuation range of economic vulnerability is larger. The vulnerability increased significantly based on spatial differential features; (2) Regional differences in economic vulnerability, mainly caused by differences within a region, increased gradually. Eastern and Western China showed the spatial pattern characteristics of prominent and reinforcing regional imbalance, while Central and Northeast China showed declining regional imbalance. The spatial structure evolution of economic vulnerability is characterized by a volatility curve, and regional separation and divergence are strengthened; (3) Growth of China’s provincial economies and economic vulnerability are related negatively. In Eastern, Central, and Northeast China, vulnerability of the provincial economies has a negative spillover effect on neighbouring provinces’ economic growth, while in Western China it has a slight positive spillover effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
R&D Cooperation and Knowledge Spillover Effects for Sustainable Business Innovation in the Chemical Industry
Sustainability 2018, 10(4), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10041064 - 03 Apr 2018
Cited by 16
Abstract
This paper investigates the influence of research and development (R&D) cooperation on the creation of spillover effects for sustainable firms in the chemical industry. We explore the evidence for the origin of knowledge spillovers derived from cooperation amongst firms and universities and R&D [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the influence of research and development (R&D) cooperation on the creation of spillover effects for sustainable firms in the chemical industry. We explore the evidence for the origin of knowledge spillovers derived from cooperation amongst firms and universities and R&D organizations as well as to test the influence of internal/external financial support on these effects. The results confirm that when firms acquire knowledge from internal sources, this leads to increased innovation and sustainable performance. We have proved that internal expenditure results in increased internal knowledge spillovers. These findings may be specific for Central and Eastern (CEE) transition countries, indicating their efforts to build path-dependent structures based on knowledge institutions and businesses as well as knowledge networks. However, this study also provides a more “global” contribution to the knowledge spillover effect theory. It shows that a firm’s cooperation both with universities and with other firms promotes different types of knowledge spillovers and can affect diverse modes of sustainable activities in innovation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Geography: Location, Innovation and Sustainable Development)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop