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Special Issue "Sustainability Issues of Micro and Macro-Scale Changes in Daily and Residential Mobility"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Philippe Gerber
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Urban development & Mobility Department, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research, Luxembourg
Interests: daily and residential mobility; urban geography; travel behavior
Prof. Dr. Sébastien Lord
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
École d’urbanisme et d’architecture de paysage, Faculté de l’aménagement, University of Montreal, Montreal, H3T 1B9 QC, Canada
Interests: mobility biographies; daily mobility choices; residential choices; housing; habitat; urban planning
Dr. Kevin Manaugh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal, H3A 2A7 QC, Canada
Interests: travel behaviour; sustainable transport; accessibility; transport justice; wellbeing
Dr. Veronique Van Acker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Urban Development and Mobility Department, Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research (LISER), L-4366 Esch/Alzette, Luxembourg
Interests: travel behaviour; travel attitudes; lifestyles; mobility biographies; generations; travel satisfaction
Prof. Samuel Carpentier-Postel
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UMR 7300 ESPACE, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, F-84000 Avignon, France
Interests: urban geography; transport and mobility; spatial analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to extend this invitation to researchers interested in sustainable transportation, sustainable mobility, and travel behaviour. Travel decisions, in terms of mode, distance, and frequency, occur at multiple temporal scales. Daily travel patterns can change, subject to short-term factors (e.g., changes in working hours) or longer-term factors, for example, related to major life events (e.g., childbirth or relationship status). Change can also be a result of economic or cultural changes (e.g., peak car or recession). Trips can also be modified, either voluntarily or not, according to new public policies (e.g., incentive pricing or improved public transport) or private actions linked to workplace relocation. These transitions, whether at a micro- or macro-level, can lead to positive or negative outcomes in terms of environmental impact and health and wellbeing effects. Choices made at the individual level can also lead to different socio-spatial consequences, increasing or decreasing territorial inequalities for instance. In this context, this Special Issue of Sustainability aims to bring together theoretical, methodological, and empirical works on the changes in mobility behaviour, whether daily, labour, or residential, by more particularly studying the relationships that may exist between them, and that lead to changing sustainable mobility and quality of life.

We are looking for papers using quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods, framed according to multidisciplinary approaches combining social sciences, engineering, or environmental sciences. Contributions may address the issues arising from current and past situations, including databases such as panels, censuses, big data, biographical interviews, or retrospective surveys, as well as social and spatial simulation, in order to take into account, for example, prospective scenarios, and temporal and geographical urban developments from the regional to individual level.

Abstracts of 400 words: 15 November 2019

Please email your abstract as Word document to [email protected]

Dr. Philippe Gerber
Prof. Dr. Sébastien Lord
Dr. Kevin Manaugh
Dr. Veronique Van Acker
Prof. Samuel Carpentier-Postel
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Behavioural changes
  • Mobility and transport
  • Mobility biographies
  • Multidisciplinarity
  • Impacts of changes
  • Travel mode choice
  • Preferences

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Sustainability Issues of Micro and Macro-Scale Changes in Daily and Residential Mobility
Sustainability 2021, 13(8), 4093; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13084093 - 07 Apr 2021
Viewed by 393
Abstract
For several decades, changes in travel behavior have been at the heart of transportation research, either to adapt the supply of transportation or to better understand the evolution of travel demand [...] Full article

Research

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Article
Does Revitalizing the Center of Mid-Sized French Cities Reduce GHG Emissions from Commuting?
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 1851; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13041851 - 08 Feb 2021
Viewed by 604
Abstract
Mid-sized cities are usually considered in the literature to be shrinking cities. Some policies promote right-sizing and others promote revitalization. The relationship between land-use planning and mobility having been established, the present research issue is focused on whether a policy of revitalizing the [...] Read more.
Mid-sized cities are usually considered in the literature to be shrinking cities. Some policies promote right-sizing and others promote revitalization. The relationship between land-use planning and mobility having been established, the present research issue is focused on whether a policy of revitalizing the centers of mid-sized cities is favorable to low-carbon mobility. Our study investigates commuting trips through two indicators: commuting trip distance and car modal share. The increase in total population, the increase in the number of jobs per resident, the decrease in the unemployment rate, the increase in the rate of executives, the increase in the rate of working people in the population and the decrease in the residential vacancy rate all come from the censuses of 2006 and 2016. Statistical models based on individuals in 113 mid-sized cities, in which sociodemographic variables are introduced, show that at the level of agglomerations, no indicator has a simultaneously positive effect in the center and in the urban periphery. No indicator is entirely positive or negative on GHG emissions from commuting trips. While the increase in GHG emissions from commuting trips between 2006 and 2016 is significant in mid-sized cities (18%), a shift toward shrinking city centers is insufficient to change this trajectory. Full article
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Article
Subcentres as Destinations: Job Decentralization, Polycentricity, and the Sustainability of Commuting Patterns in Canadian Metropolitan Areas, 1996–2016
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 9966; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239966 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 726
Abstract
Adopting more sustainable modes of transportation and shorter daily commutes remains a fundamental challenge in the struggle for the sustainable transition of cities. While past studies on the sustainability of commuting behaviours partly focused on the place of residence and how the characteristics [...] Read more.
Adopting more sustainable modes of transportation and shorter daily commutes remains a fundamental challenge in the struggle for the sustainable transition of cities. While past studies on the sustainability of commuting behaviours partly focused on the place of residence and how the characteristics of commuters or residential neighbourhoods impact sustainable travel, other studies looked at the place of employment to analyze these dynamics. In this study, we investigate the extent to which the recent phase of the rise of peripheral employment has promoted more sustainable travel behaviour, based on the hypothesis that polycentricity has recently favoured a better job–housing balance and co-location. We develop a general typology of employment centres, using Census microdata at fine spatial scale over the 1996–2016 period to observe commuting modes and distances by subcentre types for six major Canadian cities. Our results show that despite recent developments in planning practices—transit-oriented development, transport infrastructure, and changing travel behaviour, the emergence of peripheral subcentres promoted less sustainable commuting patterns in most Canadian metropolitan areas over the period. However, we find sustainable commuting emerging in subcentres where large public transport infrastructure investments have been made, such as in the case of Vancouver’s Millennium and Canada lines. Our study also shows that central business districts (CBDs) and downtown subcentres are becoming relatively more sustainable over the period, which confirms the positive effect of the back-to-the-city movement and changing behaviour toward active transportation in these locations. Full article
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Article
Residential Mobility and Quality of Life between Metropolitan Areas: The Case of South Korea
Sustainability 2020, 12(20), 8611; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12208611 - 17 Oct 2020
Viewed by 576
Abstract
This study investigated the theory of residential mobility in terms of quality of life, focusing on convenience and the urban environment. The evaluation items (e.g., the accessibility to infrastructure, security, the environment, and social relationships) were selected based on previous studies, and a [...] Read more.
This study investigated the theory of residential mobility in terms of quality of life, focusing on convenience and the urban environment. The evaluation items (e.g., the accessibility to infrastructure, security, the environment, and social relationships) were selected based on previous studies, and a one-way ANOVA was conducted. The Korea Housing Survey was used to obtain data on the evaluations of homeowners who migrated to Seoul (the capital of South Korea) and to the surrounding metropolitan area (Gyeong-in). The regression analysis identified the factors affecting the overall satisfaction with the two destinations. The group that had migrated from Gyeong-in to Seoul was more satisfied with the medical, public, cultural, and transportation facilities than the group that had migrated from Seoul to Gyeong-in. Differences were also found between the two groups in the factors affecting their overall satisfaction with the migration destination. Factors such as satisfaction with transportation, commercial facilities, and cultural facilities affected the overall satisfaction with both destinations. However, homeownership affected the dependent variables only in Gyeong-in. The implications for potential improvements to infrastructure and housing distribution are discussed. Full article
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Article
Analysis of the Possibility of Transport Mode Switch: A Case Study for Joinville Students
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5232; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135232 - 28 Jun 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 949
Abstract
This work mainly aims to identify and understand the factors influencing the switching of transportation modes among higher-education students in Joinville, Brazil, when traveling to universities. An online questionnaire was prepared for data collection which obtained 511 responses from six higher education institutions. [...] Read more.
This work mainly aims to identify and understand the factors influencing the switching of transportation modes among higher-education students in Joinville, Brazil, when traveling to universities. An online questionnaire was prepared for data collection which obtained 511 responses from six higher education institutions. The revealed preference survey identified the bus as the most used by students today, while the stated preference survey assessed the possibility of changing modes. Employing a multinomial logit model, the results indicate that students would be interested in switching from individual motor vehicles to other options. The scenarios for switching to buses presented the highest switching probability. Bus cost was the most important factor for switching. Despite the small number, the students showed interest in switching from the car to active modes. This may indicate the lack of current infrastructure and the need for investments so these modes can be seen as quality options for users. Finally, a transport mode switch would occur only if alternative modes to the car or their infrastructure are improved; otherwise, students maintain their usual choices. This knowledge can assist in the development of public policies aimed at urban management seeking to increase the supply and the quality of more sustainable modes of transport. Full article
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Article
Understanding Better the Influential Factors of Commuters’ Multi-Day Travel Behavior: Evidence from Shanghai, China
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010376 - 02 Jan 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1100
Abstract
Alleviating traffic congestion and developing sustainable transportation systems in a city can be assisted by promoting environmentally friendly transportation modes such as walking, cycling, and public transport. Strategies for promoting these desirable transportation modes can be identified based on a sound understanding of [...] Read more.
Alleviating traffic congestion and developing sustainable transportation systems in a city can be assisted by promoting environmentally friendly transportation modes such as walking, cycling, and public transport. Strategies for promoting these desirable transportation modes can be identified based on a sound understanding of how commuters choose travel modes. In this study, multi-day commuting travel mode data was used to explore factors that influenced commute mode choice. A multinomial logit model and a binary logit model were proposed to study commuter travel behavior. The results showed the following. (1) Age, gender, and marriage indirectly influence the commute mode choice; (2) The cost of travel mode has little effect on commute mode choice; (3) The probability of commute mode change mainly influences the car mode choice; (4) The number of transfer times and the distance to the nearest public transport stations are main factors that restrict commuters from choosing public transport; (5) The number of bicycles in the family and commute distance are main factors that restrict commuters from choosing cycling for commuting. Based on these findings, several potential measures are demonstrated to policymakers and transportation planners to alleviate traffic congestion and develop sustainable transportation systems. Full article
Article
Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Citizens’ Mobility Based on E-Bike GPS Trajectory Data in Tengzhou City, China
Sustainability 2019, 11(18), 5003; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11185003 - 12 Sep 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1060
Abstract
Environmentally friendly shared transit systems have become ubiquitous at present. As a result, analyzing the ranges and tracts of human activities and gatherings based on bike share data is scientifically useful. This paper investigates the spatial and temporal travel characteristics of citizens based [...] Read more.
Environmentally friendly shared transit systems have become ubiquitous at present. As a result, analyzing the ranges and tracts of human activities and gatherings based on bike share data is scientifically useful. This paper investigates the spatial and temporal travel characteristics of citizens based on real-time-extracted electric bikes (e-bikes) Global Positioning System (GPS) data from May to July in 2018 in the central area of Tengzhou City, Shandong Province, China. The research is conducive for the exploration of citizens’ changes in mobility behaviors, for the analysis of relationships between mobility changes and environmental or other possible factors, and for advancing policy proposals. The main conclusions of the study are as follows. First, in general, citizens’ travelling is featured by rides that are less than 10 min, shorter than 5 km, and with a speed between 5 km/h and 20 km/h. Second, in terms of temporal characteristics, monthly e-bike usage and citizens’ mobility are positively correlated with temperature in May and negatively correlated with temperature in July; an overall negative correlation is also manifested between the e-bike usage (mobility) and air quality index; daily usage reaches a trough on Tuesday and a peak on Friday, indicating the extent of mobility on respective days; e-bike usage and human outdoor behaviors are significantly lowered in rainy weather than in sunny weather; hourly rides reach a peak at 18:00 (more human activities) and a trough at 2:00 (less activities), and average hourly riding speed maximizes at 5:00 and minimizes around 8:00 and 17:00. Third, for spatial characteristics, destinations (D points) during morning rush hour and regions where e-bikes are densely employed are concentrated mainly in mid-north and middle parts of the central area (major human gatherings), and the rides have a diffusing pattern; e-bike origin–destination (O–D) trajectories radiate mostly towards the mid-north and the east during evening rush hour. In addition, 9.4% of the total trips to work areas during morning rush hour represent spillover commuting, indicating that separations between jobs and residential are not severe in the central area of Tengzhou City and commuting is relatively convenient. Full article
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Review

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Review
Short- and Long-Term Impacts of Workplace Relocation: A Survey and Experience from the University of Luxembourg Relocation
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7506; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187506 - 11 Sep 2020
Viewed by 697
Abstract
Workplace relocation can have a significant impact on commuting trips as well as on the location and number of activities scheduled within the home-work tour. This often exogenous, non-voluntary event affects the entire activity-travel behavior of the employees. As response, employees can adopt [...] Read more.
Workplace relocation can have a significant impact on commuting trips as well as on the location and number of activities scheduled within the home-work tour. This often exogenous, non-voluntary event affects the entire activity-travel behavior of the employees. As response, employees can adopt several short- and long-term adaptation strategies to cope with such change, the most obvious being commuting mode shifting, acquire new mobility resources (e.g., buying a car) or changing residential location. As workplace relocation can be consequence of national policies aimed at decongesting the city centers or to favor the development of new business areas, undesired macroscopic changes in modal shares and in land developments may be observed. While a decrease in the commuting time after a workplace relocation is, in some cases, observed, an increase in car use for the commuting trip may be observed as well. This paper aims at providing an in-depth understanding of the effect of workplace relocation on travel behavior by reviewing and selecting the relevant scientific literature on the topic, which has in the last years gained popularity. The findings and observations summarized by the literature review are then complemented with the specific example of the relocation of the University of Luxembourg employees. Finally, we indicate potential directions for research, which are currently underexplored. Full article
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