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BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Engineering and Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 37381

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Guest Editor
Instituto Universitario de Arquitectura y Ciencias de la Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura, Universidad de Sevilla, 41012 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: LCA BIM-based method; life cycle sustainability assessment of building and urban systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The activity carried out by the construction sector produces huge environmental, social and economic consequences at local, regional and global levels. In order to contribute to the optimization of the impacts of this essential activity, numerous current investigations try to analyze and evaluate building and construction alternatives, using different methodological approaches. Many of these research projects are based on the use of the life cycle sustainability assessment framework, which has turned out to be a set of useful methodologies that are effective for analysis and evaluation. However, the application of these tools and procedures generally consumes a large amount of time, energy and resources when applied to construction and building systems, mainly due to the qualitative and quantitative complexity of the building phenomenon. Fortunately, in recent years, the use of building information modeling (BIM) platforms have proven to be an innovative, useful and effective aid to the development of building assessments, especially in the process of calculating inventories, obtaining and visualizing results and, more recently, optimizing systems from the life cycle perspective. In order to present the current approaches and trends in this field and to show their practical applications, this Special Issue will compile a selection of research projects that use BIM platforms as a methodological basis and are carried out in the context of the environmental, economic and social assessment of construction, building and urban systems.

Prof. Dr. Antonio Garcia-Martinez
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Building information modeling (BIM)
  • Environmental impact assessment
  • Life cycle sustainability assessment (LCSA)
  • Life cycle assessment (LCA)
  • Life cycle cost (LCC)
  • Social life cycle assessment (S-LCA)
  • Geographical information system (GIS)
  • Embodied and operational environmental impacts
  • Integration and visualization
  • BIM–LCA integration tools
  • Sustainable building

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 158 KiB  
Editorial
BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings
by Antonio Garcia-Martinez
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 11902; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141911902 - 21 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1262
Abstract
The construction of buildings has a high level of environmental impacts [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)

Research

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19 pages, 31513 KiB  
Article
Social Housing Life Cycle Management: Workflow for the Enhancement of Digital Management Based on Building Information Modelling (BIM)
by Manuel Castellano-Román, Antonio Garcia-Martinez and María Luisa Pérez López
Sustainability 2022, 14(12), 7488; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14127488 - 20 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1892
Abstract
The management of the life cycle of large publicly owned social housing complexes requires a large amount of human and technological resources, the optimization of which is a desirable and shared objective. This article proposes a workflow for the enhancement of these management [...] Read more.
The management of the life cycle of large publicly owned social housing complexes requires a large amount of human and technological resources, the optimization of which is a desirable and shared objective. This article proposes a workflow for the enhancement of these management processes based on BIM (Building Information Modelling), a methodology capable of integrating architectural information into a three-dimensional graphic model. The proposed workflow defines the basic characteristics of the BIM model oriented toward sustainable building management and its relationship with the key moments of its life cycle. It also analyzes the architectural information associated with the models and determines which parameters are optimal for their completion from the BIM models in terms of reliability, auditability, and automation. For this purpose, a case study has been developed for a multifamily residential building in Malaga (Spain), owned by the Andalusian Housing and Rehabilitation Agency AVRA, a public agency that manages a housing stock of more than 70,000 dwellings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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20 pages, 2022 KiB  
Article
BIM and Automation in Complex Building Assessment
by Jan Růžička, Jakub Veselka, Zdeněk Rudovský, Stanislav Vitásek and Petr Hájek
Sustainability 2022, 14(4), 2237; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14042237 - 16 Feb 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2531
Abstract
When using Building Information Modeling (BIM) for complex building design, optimizing the building quality in a design phase becomes an important part of integrated and advanced building design. The use of data from an information model in the design phase allows efficient assessment [...] Read more.
When using Building Information Modeling (BIM) for complex building design, optimizing the building quality in a design phase becomes an important part of integrated and advanced building design. The use of data from an information model in the design phase allows efficient assessment of different design strategies and structural variants and a higher quality of the final design. This paper aims to analyze and verify possible BIM data-driven workflows for Complex Building Quality Assessment (CBQA) and a suitable BIM data structure set up for automatic assessment and evaluation. For an efficient automation process in complex quality building assessment in the design phase, it is necessary first to understand the data structure of the Industry Foundation Classes (IFC), which is widely accepted and used for buildings, and second to understand the data structure of the assessment methodology used for the assessment. This article describes possible data workflows for an automatic assessment based on the experience gained on a case study of the real pilot project of a residential building, where the complex building quality was tested using SBToolCZ, the Czech national assessment method. This article presents the experience and recommendations for setting up the data model of a building for automatic assessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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21 pages, 1320 KiB  
Article
Reverse Logistics Performance Indicators for the Construction Sector: A Building Project Case
by Mochamad Agung Wibowo, Naniek Utami Handayani, Anita Mustikasari, Sherly Ayu Wardani and Benny Tjahjono
Sustainability 2022, 14(2), 963; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14020963 - 15 Jan 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3730
Abstract
While the performance evaluation of reverse logistics (RL) practices in the construction sector is crucial, it is seemingly limited compared to that in the manufacturing sector. As the project life cycle in the construction sector is typically long, effective coordination among the stakeholders [...] Read more.
While the performance evaluation of reverse logistics (RL) practices in the construction sector is crucial, it is seemingly limited compared to that in the manufacturing sector. As the project life cycle in the construction sector is typically long, effective coordination among the stakeholders is needed to integrate RL into each phase of the project life cycle. This paper proposes a new model of RL for the construction industry, incorporating the dimensions, elements, and, most importantly, indicators needed for the evaluation of RL performance. The model was initially derived from the extant literature. It was then refined through (1) focus group discussion, by which suggestions pertinent to the proposed model were collated from academics and practitioners, and (2) judgments by academics and practitioners to validate the model. The validated model includes 21 indicators to measure RL performance, spanned throughout the green initiation, green design, green material management, green construction, and green operation and maintenance phases. The paper offers a new method for how RL can be adopted in the construction industry by proposing an innovative model that will benefit stakeholders in the construction industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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21 pages, 1943 KiB  
Article
BIM-Based Life Cycle Assessment of Buildings—An Investigation of Industry Practice and Needs
by Regitze Kjær Zimmermann, Simone Bruhn and Harpa Birgisdóttir
Sustainability 2021, 13(10), 5455; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13105455 - 13 May 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 4842
Abstract
The climate debate necessitates reducing greenhouse gas emissions from buildings. A common and standardized method of assessing this is life cycles assessment (LCA); however, time and costs are a barrier. Large efficiency potentials are associated with using data from building information models (BIM) [...] Read more.
The climate debate necessitates reducing greenhouse gas emissions from buildings. A common and standardized method of assessing this is life cycles assessment (LCA); however, time and costs are a barrier. Large efficiency potentials are associated with using data from building information models (BIM) for the LCA, but development is still at an early stage. This study investigates the industry practice and needs for BIM–LCA, and if these are met through a prototype for the Danish context, using IFC and a 3D view. Eight qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with medium and large architect, engineering, and contractor companies, covering a large part of the Danish AEC industry. The companies used a quantity take-off approach, and a few were developing plug-in approaches. Challenges included the lack of quality in the models, thus most companies supplemented model data with other data sources. Features they found valuable for BIM–LCA included visual interface, transparency of data, automation, design evaluation, and flexibility. The 3D view of the prototype met some of the needs, however, there were mixed responses on the use of IFC, due to different workflow needs in the companies. Future BIM–LCA development should include considerations on the lack of quality in models and should support different workflows. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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18 pages, 2241 KiB  
Article
Development of Building Information Modeling Template for Environmental Impact Assessment
by Sungwoo Lee, Sungho Tae, Hyungjae Jang, Chang U. Chae and Youngjin Bok
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3092; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063092 - 11 Mar 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2978
Abstract
Eco-friendly building designs that use building information modeling (BIM) have become popular, and a variety of eco-friendly building assessment technologies that take advantage of BIM are being developed. However, existing building environmental performance assessment technologies that use BIM are linked to external assessment [...] Read more.
Eco-friendly building designs that use building information modeling (BIM) have become popular, and a variety of eco-friendly building assessment technologies that take advantage of BIM are being developed. However, existing building environmental performance assessment technologies that use BIM are linked to external assessment tools, and there exist compatibility issues among programs; it requires a considerable amount of time to address these problems, owing to the lack of experts who can operate the programs. This study aims to develop eco-friendly templates for assessing the embodied environmental impact of buildings using BIM authoring tools as part of the development of BIM-based building life cycle assessment (LCA) technologies. Therefore, an embodied environmental impact unit database was developed, for major building materials during production and operating stages, to perform embodied environmental impact assessments. Moreover, a major structural element library that uses the database was developed and a function was created to produce building environmental performance assessment results tables, making it possible to review the eco-friendliness of buildings. A case study analysis was performed to review the feasibility of the environmental performance assessment technologies. The results showed a less than 5% effective error rate in the assessment results that were obtained using the technology developed in this study compared with the assessment results based on the actual calculation and operating stage energy consumption figures, which proves the reliability of the proposed approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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17 pages, 1035 KiB  
Article
Integrating BIM-Based LCA and Building Sustainability Assessment
by José Pedro Carvalho, Ismael Alecrim, Luís Bragança and Ricardo Mateus
Sustainability 2020, 12(18), 7468; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12187468 - 10 Sep 2020
Cited by 44 | Viewed by 5399
Abstract
With the increasing concerns about building environmental impacts, building information modelling (BIM) has been used to perform different kinds of sustainability analysis. Among the most popular are the life cycle assessment (LCA) and building sustainability assessment (BSA). However, the integration of BIM-based LCA [...] Read more.
With the increasing concerns about building environmental impacts, building information modelling (BIM) has been used to perform different kinds of sustainability analysis. Among the most popular are the life cycle assessment (LCA) and building sustainability assessment (BSA). However, the integration of BIM-based LCA in BSA methods has not been adequately explored yet. This study addresses the relation between LCA and BSA within the BIM context for the Portuguese context. By performing an LCA for a Portuguese case study, a set of sustainability criteria from SBTool were simultaneous assessed during the process. The possibility of integrating BIM-based LCA into BSA methods can include more life cycle stages in the sustainability assessment and allow for normalising and producing more comparable results. BIM automates and connects different stages of the design process and provides information for multi-disciplinary data storage. However, there are still some constraints, such as different BSA/LCA databases and the necessity to manually introduce the embodied life cycle impacts of building materials. The scope of the BSA analysis can be expanded by integrating a complete LCA and be fostered by the support of BIM, effectively improving building sustainability according to local standards. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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Review

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29 pages, 4297 KiB  
Review
The Role of the Interface and Interface Management in the Optimization of BIM Multi-Model Applications: A Review
by Nawal Abdunasseer Hmidah, Nuzul Azam Haron, Aidi Hizami Alias, Teik Hua Law, Abubaker Basheer Abdalwhab Altohami and Raja Ahmad Azmeer Raja Ahmad Effendi
Sustainability 2022, 14(3), 1869; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14031869 - 7 Feb 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3953
Abstract
This review targets the BIM interface, the BIM multi-model approach, and the role of employing algorithms in BIM optimization to introduce the need for automation in the BIM technique, instead of complicating manual procedures in order to reduce possible errors. The challenge with [...] Read more.
This review targets the BIM interface, the BIM multi-model approach, and the role of employing algorithms in BIM optimization to introduce the need for automation in the BIM technique, instead of complicating manual procedures in order to reduce possible errors. The challenge with adopting BIM lies in the limiting ability of computer-aided design (CAD) to generate a read-able and straightforward Revit by BIM, requiring the homogeneous data format to be generalized better and maintain a super data mod. Furthermore, the communication and management inter-face (CMI) faces some shortcomings due to limitations in its ability to recognize the role of the interface during the project construction phase. This review demonstrates several proposals to simplify the interface, in order to facilitate better communication amongst participants. The industry foundation class (IFC) model requires a new technique to unlock the potential future of intelligent buildings using the BIM multi-model approach integrated with the Internet of Things (IoT). Trials conducted to enhance the BIM model lack advanced methods for optimizing cost, energy consumption, labor, material movement, and the size of layout of the project, by utilizing heuristic, metaheuristic, and k-mean algorithms. The enhancement of BIM could involve algorithms to achieve better productivity, safety, cost, time, and construction frameworks. The review shows that some gaps and limitations still exist, especially considering the potential link between BIM and building management system (BMS) and the level of influence of the BIM-IoT prototype. Future work should find the best approach to solve facility management within the dynamic model, which is still under investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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30 pages, 6925 KiB  
Review
Investigating Approaches of Integrating BIM, IoT, and Facility Management for Renovating Existing Buildings: A Review
by Abubaker Basheer Abdalwhab Altohami, Nuzul Azam Haron, Aidi Hizami Ales@Alias and Teik Hua Law
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3930; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073930 - 2 Apr 2021
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 8662
Abstract
The importance of building information is highly attached to the ability of conventional storing to provide professional analysis. The Internet of Things (IoT) and smart devices offer a vast amount of live data stored in heterogeneous repositories, and hence the need for smart [...] Read more.
The importance of building information is highly attached to the ability of conventional storing to provide professional analysis. The Internet of Things (IoT) and smart devices offer a vast amount of live data stored in heterogeneous repositories, and hence the need for smart methodologies to facilitate IoT–BIM integration is very crucial. The first step to better integrating IoT and Building Information Modeling (BIM) can be performed by implementing the Service-Oriented-Architecture (SOA) to combining software and other services by replacing the sematic information that was failed to display elements of indoor conditions. The other development is to create link that able to update static models towards real-time models using SOA approach. The existing approach relies on one-way interaction; however, developing two-way communication to mimic human cognitive has become very crucial. The high-tech approach requires highly involving Cloud computations to better connect IoT devices throughout Internet infrastructure. This approach is based on the integration of Building Information Modeling (BIM) with real-time data from IoT devices aiming at improving construction and operational efficiencies and to provide high-fidelity BIM models for numerous applications. The paper discusses challenges, limitations, and barriers that face BIM–IoT integration and simultaneously solves interoperability issues and Cloud computing. The paper provides a comprehensive review that explores and identifies common emerging areas of application and common design patterns of the traditional BIM-IoT integration followed by devising better methodologies to integrate IoT in BIM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue BIM-Based Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment for Buildings)
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