Special Issue "Wildlife Conservation: A Sustainability Perspective"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Achyut Aryal
Website
Guest Editor
1. Charles Perkins Centre, School of Life and Environmental SciencesFaculty of Science, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
2. Human-Wildlife Interaction Research Group, Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 102904, Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: Wildlife; climate change; human-wildlife conflict/interaction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to the Special Issue on ‘Wildlife Conservation: A Sustainability Perspective’ that will be published early 2021 by Sustainability. Topics and contents include but are not limited to:

  1. Human wildlife conflict and its relationship with behavioural ecology of animals;
  2. Impact of land use change and its effect in wildlife conservation;
  3. Human induce human–wildlife conflict;
  4. Economic loss due to human and wildlife conflict;
  5. Human–wildlife–climate change interaction;
  6. Conservation biology and conflict resolution;
  7. Mitigation and policy support to mitigate the conflict (wildlife).

Dr. Achyut Aryal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Human–wildlife conflict
  • Climate change
  • Conservation biology
  • Wildlife conservation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
“We’re Made Criminals Just to Eat off the Land”: Colonial Wildlife Management and Repercussions on Inuit Well-Being
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8177; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198177 - 03 Oct 2020
Abstract
Across Inuit Nunangat, Inuit rely on wildlife for food security, cultural continuity, intergenerational learning, and livelihoods. Caribou has been an essential species for Inuit for millennia, providing food, clothing, significant cultural practices, and knowledge-sharing. Current declines in many caribou populations—often coupled with hunting [...] Read more.
Across Inuit Nunangat, Inuit rely on wildlife for food security, cultural continuity, intergenerational learning, and livelihoods. Caribou has been an essential species for Inuit for millennia, providing food, clothing, significant cultural practices, and knowledge-sharing. Current declines in many caribou populations—often coupled with hunting moratoriums—have significant impacts on Inuit food, culture, livelihoods, and well-being. Following an Inuit-led approach, this study characterized Inuit-caribou relationships; explored Inuit perspectives on how caribou have been managed; and identified opportunities for sustaining the Mealy Mountain Caribou. Qualitative data were collected in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut, Labrador, Canada through 21 in-depth interviews and two community open houses. Data were analyzed using constant comparative methods and thematic analysis. Rigolet Inuit described: how conservation management decisions had disrupted important connections among caribou and Inuit, particularly related to food, culture, and well-being; the socio-cultural and emotional impacts of the criminalization of an important cultural practice, as well as perceived inequities in wildlife conservation enforcement; and the frustration, anger, and hurt with not being heard or included in caribou management decisions. These results provide insights into experiences of historic and ongoing colonial wildlife management decisions, and highlight future directions for management initiatives for the health and well-being of Inuit and caribou. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wildlife Conservation: A Sustainability Perspective)
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Open AccessArticle
People’s Knowledge of Illegal Chinese Pangolin Trade Routes in Central Nepal
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4900; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124900 - 16 Jun 2020
Abstract
Chinese pangolin populations are declining globally due to illegal wildlife trades in its range countries, especially China and Vietnam, where the largest markets for this species exist. Identifying the trade routes is crucial for developing conservation plans for the pangolin and understanding the [...] Read more.
Chinese pangolin populations are declining globally due to illegal wildlife trades in its range countries, especially China and Vietnam, where the largest markets for this species exist. Identifying the trade routes is crucial for developing conservation plans for the pangolin and understanding the attributes of the individuals involved in the illegal trade. We aimed to identify local trade routes and the socio-economic status of people involved in pangolin trades from the Gaurishankar Conservation Area [a Protected Area (PA)] and the Ramechhap district [a non-Protected Area (non-PA)] of Nepal. We found that pangolin traders were typically poor, illiterate, unemployed, male, and of working age (17–40 years old). Confiscation rates of pangolin parts were higher in non-PAs than Pas as the illegal trade routes seemed to differ between the PAs and non-PAs. From 2014 to 2018, the prices of pangolin scales in PAs and non-PAs increased by 50% and 67%, respectively. Our results highlight locals facilitating the trade of pangolins, therefore we recommend the need for other income generating sources such as ecotourism or providing incentives to promote local industries as well as to establish Community Based Anti-Poaching Units among range countries and trade route countries to control the trade of this globally threatened species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wildlife Conservation: A Sustainability Perspective)
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Open AccessArticle
Simulation of Human Activity Intensity and Its Influence on Mammal Diversity in Sanjiangyuan National Park, China
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4601; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114601 - 04 Jun 2020
Abstract
The rapid pace of development in western China has brought about inevitable concerns for environmental conditions and their management. The Sanjiangyuan National Park strives to address concerns for sustainable water resources management and biodiversity management, especially for the protection of endangered flora and [...] Read more.
The rapid pace of development in western China has brought about inevitable concerns for environmental conditions and their management. The Sanjiangyuan National Park strives to address concerns for sustainable water resources management and biodiversity management, especially for the protection of endangered flora and fauna. In this study, a machine learning model (MaxEnt) was used to predict the human activity intensity and its effects on species in Sanjiangyuan protected by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The model used human settlements as input and datasets such as terrain factors, climate, and artificial structures as environmental factors. The results showed that human activity intensity was significantly different between the East and the West. The area with the highest human activity intensity was Yushu County in the south area, and Xinghai-Zeku County in the east. By comparing the mammal richness with human activity intensity, we found human–wildlife coexistence in Sanjiangyuan. A detailed analysis on the CITES protected species showed that many important species, such as snow leopards, red pandas, and small Indian civets, occupied areas with high human activity intensity. The national park protects 3/4 CITES species with 1/3 in the area of the Sanjiangyuan region, owing to the relatively low human activity intensity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wildlife Conservation: A Sustainability Perspective)
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Open AccessArticle
Changes in the Historical and Current Habitat Ranges of Rare Wild Mammals in China: A Case Study of Six Taxa of Small- to Large-Sized Mammals
Sustainability 2020, 12(7), 2744; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12072744 - 31 Mar 2020
Abstract
Through history, the habitats of wild mammals have changed greatly in China. Habitat changes may reflect changes in the environment and human–wildlife conflicts. This study focused on how the habitat changed for six taxa of rare wild mammals (one family, one genus, and [...] Read more.
Through history, the habitats of wild mammals have changed greatly in China. Habitat changes may reflect changes in the environment and human–wildlife conflicts. This study focused on how the habitat changed for six taxa of rare wild mammals (one family, one genus, and four species) in mainland China. Their historical and current habitats were estimated according to their historical and current presence occurrences and three sets of environmental data (climate data, topography data, and human activity data), using the Maximum Entropy Model. Then, spatial statistical methods were used to analyze the changes in their habitats, and how human activities have influenced changes in their habitat. The results suggest that the habitats of all six taxa of mammals have shrunk considerably, compared to their historical ranges. With regards to current or past habitats, on average, 68.3% of habitats have been lost. The Asian elephant, which is facing the most serious habitat losses, has lost 93.1% of its habitat. By investigating the relationship between the changes in habitats and the anthropogenic impacts for each taxa, human activities have an obvious negative influence on mammal habitats. The sensitivity of habitats to human activities varies among different mammals: the tiger, Asian elephant, Bactrian camel, and snub-nosed monkey are more sensitive to human activities than musk deer and Chinese water deer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wildlife Conservation: A Sustainability Perspective)
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