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Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2023) | Viewed by 32401

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor

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Guest Editor
Entrepreneurship, MBSC Prince Mohammad Bin Salman College, King Abdullah Economic City 23965 – 2609, Saudi Arabia
Interests: entrepreneurship; women; empowerment; MENA countries
Management and Organisation, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury CT1 1QU, UK
Interests: entrepreneurship; family business and sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Innovation, Technology & Entrepreneurship, College of Business & Economics, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain 12345, United Arab Emirates
Interests: Islamic marketing; values; entrepreneurship; methodology; tourism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Women, Leadership and Sustainable Development, ESA Business School, Beirut 289, Lebanon
Interests: women's leadership in MENA/Africa; HRD and HRM, international development and sustainability; entrepreneurship/social entrepreneurship in the GCC and middle east; NGOs and social change; global feminisms including islamic feminism; gender and governance; educational leadership; islamic ethics/finance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 1995 Beijing Platform for Women provided the stimulus for advancing women's role in the development process. It stimulated global transnational networking, and forged alliances that led to the formation of the MDGs (Millenium Development Goals) in 2000.  However, for many Global South territories the MDG framework was a disappointment, as positive impacts were uneven across countries, regions and social groups. Evaluation of the progress highlighted that the poorest and women, in particular, were bypassed (UN 2012).

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted in 2015 as successors to the MDGs. They represent the priorities of the global community regarding human development (UN 2021). They guide and support development priorities, as well as actions for the public and private sectors to realize economic, social, environmental development and well-being. At their heart are people, planet and prosperity (UN 2021). The role of women in entrepreneurship, management and corporate governance has been regarded as central to successful sustainable development and welfare of economies (Datta and Gailey 2012; Duflo 2012; Mammen and Paxson 2000), and an increase in women’s economic and socio-political participation improves the wellbeing of the women as societal benefits are increased when women promote social change, innovation and development (Sen 1999). Sen (1999: 201) states that “women are increasingly seen, by men as well as women, as active agents of change: the dynamic promoters of social transformations that can alter the lives of both women and men.” Particularly, the role of women-owned businesses has drawn the attention of national governments and especially international development organizations such as the UN, the World Bank, OECD and others which actively invest in female entrepreneurial capacity building (UN Women 2020, OECD 2017, World Bank 2019). Such efforts also express the conviction that investment into female entrepreneurial capacities will increase women’s empowerment and reduce gender inequality - a pivotal antecedent for any sustainable development (OECD 2017; Sachs 2020).

However, the prevailing view of women’s entrepreneurship for development has been criticized as too US and Eurocentric (Wood et al. 2021; Al-Dajani and Marlow 2010, 2013) and as normatively masculinized (Ahl, 2004; Brush et al. 2009; Ahl and Marlow, 2012) for it reduces female entrepreneurial agency to the recognition and exploitation of business opportunities, driven by pursuit of personal wealth creation (Shane and Venkataraman 2000). Scholars insist that diverse cultural, geographic and institutional contexts lead to multiple entrepreneurial expressions and socioeconomic and political outcomes (Bastian et al. 2019; Welter 2011, Al-Dajani and Marlow 2010, 2013). Furthermore, despite an important body of literature concerned with the role of women ventures for development, to date, we still have little understanding of how women’s entrepreneurship can support sustainable development in the varied contexts of the Global South, especially in the ‘new normal’ Covid-19 era. In fact, the pandemic represents a severe setback for progress in women’s economic participation worldwide and women have been disproportionally harsher hit by the negative fallout compared with men. Recent research by Oxfam (2021) revealed that during the first year of the pandemic, women lost 64 million jobs (in the formal economy), and suffered at least US$800 billion in revenue losses. As yet, these estimates do not account for the millions of women who work in the informal economy, and who have lost their livelihoods because of Covid19. 

Progress towards realizing the UN SDGs by 2030 was already far from reachable before the Covid-19 global pandemic, mainly because of insufficient investments in sustainability (UN 2019). However, the given trends and developments since the pandemic started are a serious setback to gender equality (a central SDG) and sustainable development, and risks holding back global development and reversing the already achieved progress (UN Women 2020).

In this context, the global efforts to promote and support women’s entrepreneurship as a means for enhancing gender equality, social development and innovation are vital. For example, entrepreneurship can help alleviate poverty, enhance health care and education, and reduce environmental destruction (Metcalfe 2011; Metcalfe and Woodhams 2012). There is a need therefore to unravel and explore the extent to which women’s entrepreneurship can contribute to the realization of the UN SDGs.

This Special Issue calls for theoretical and empirical research and especially studies of women’s entrepreneurship as means of supporting sustainability development. This could also include the ways in which sustainability is conceptualized in different contexts. We encourage multi-method, qualitative and quantitative approaches. Please, note that the list of topics below represents propositions and is not exhaustive. We encourage authors to draw on works that are not published in English in order to provide space and give voice to research emerging in a variety of cultural contexts.

  • The impact of women run businesses and female venturing on poverty alleviation and poverty reduction.
  • The influence of poverty contexts on women’s entrepreneurial opportunities and their potential for wealth creation and sustainable growth.
  • The identification and analysis of innovative projects by women-led businesses that support SDGs.
  • Technological and digital gender divides with regards to women’s access, use, as well as exposure to technology and related consequences regarding sustained gender inequalities in entrepreneurship.
  • The impact of new technology platforms on female entrepreneurs.
  • Actual and potential consequences of technology choices on women entrepreneurs and the impact on sustainable and inclusive growth.
  • Prevailing systems of Intellectual Property Rights (IPS) challenging entrepreneurial and entrepreneuring women (e.g. within the agricultural context traditional rights of rural women as conservationist of seed and farm knowledge is eroded by international corporations’ patent holders and plant breeders) and creating threats for sustainable development.
  • The potential of female social entrepreneurship in addressing SDGs.
  • The critical evaluation of environmental and climate crises and market-based approaches regarding women entrepreneurship to address sustainability issues.
  • Research addressing international neoliberal development discourses and women empowerment through entrepreneurship.
  • Case studies from different industry sectors or geographies addressing the role of female entrepreneurs in advancing SDGs (analyzing impact factors, business models, entrepreneurial aspirations, etc.).
  • Effects of sustainable or unsustainable urban environments on female venturing experiences.
  • Analysis of gendered entrepreneurial ecosystems and the consequences for the implementation of sustainable and equitable policies.
  • Theoretical exploration of equality, equity, and sustainable dynamics of women’s empowerment through entrepreneurship.
  • Institutional frameworks in countries and their effect on SDGs and women entrepreneurship.
  • Research on broader forms of entrepreneurship and venturing, such as social entrepreneurship, eco-entrepreneurship, mumpreneurship, rural entrepreneurship and their contribution to SDGs.
  • The role of women’s associations and networks in addressing the UN SDGs and supporting women-owned ventures.
  • The role of entrepreneurial ecosystems in nurturing women’s entrepreneurship and sustainability.
  • Women entrepreneurship contributing to clean energy solutions for sustainable development.
  • Case studies/ narratives of women entrepreneurs encouraging and pursuing conscious and responsible consumption.

References

Ahl, H. (2004), The Scientific Reproduction of Gender Inequality: A Discourse Analysis of Research Texts on Women’s Entrepreneurship, Liber, Stockholm.

Ahl, H. and Marlow, S. (2012), Exploring the dynamics of gender, feminism and entrepreneurship: advancing debate to escape a dead end? Organization, Vol. 19 No. 5, pp. 543-562.

Al-Dajani, H. and Marlow, S. (2010), The impact of women’s home-based enterprise on marriage dynamics: evidence from Jordan, International Small Business Journal, Vol. 28 No. 5, pp. 470-487

Al-Dajani, H., & Marlow, S. (2013). Empowerment and entrepreneurship: A theoretical framework. International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour & Research, 19(5), 503-524.

Bastian, B. L., Metcalfe, B. D., Zali, M. R. (2019). Gender Inequality: Entrepreneurship Development in the MENA Region. Sustainability, 11(22), 6472.

OECD (2017), Gender Equality and Women’s empowerment in fragile and conflict affected situations: a review if donor support. OECD Development Policy Papers, October 2017, No.8, retrieved on 14.1.2020, from: https://www.oecd.org/dac/conflict-fragility-resilience/docs/Gender_equality_in_fragile_situations_2017.pdf

Sachs, J. D. (2012). From millennium development goals to sustainable development goals. The Lancet, 379(9832), 2206-2211.

Shane, S., & Venkataraman, S. (2000). The promise of entrepreneurship as a field of research. Academy of management review25(1), 217-226.

UN (2012), UN System Task Team on the post-2015 UN Development Agenda Review of the contributions of the MDG Agenda to foster development: lessons for the post-2015 UN Development Agenda 16 March 2012, retrieved from: https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/policy/untaskteam_undf/group_a_mdg_assessment.pdf

United Nations (2019), Attaining Sustainable Development Goals by 2030 Will Be Impossible at Current Investment Rate, Deputy Secretary-General Tells Global Compact CEO Event, retrieved from: https://www.un.org/press/en/2019/dsgsm1347.doc.htm

UN women (2020), COVID-19 and its economic toll on women: The story behind the numbers, retrieved from: https://www.unwomen.org/en/news/stories/2020/9/feature-covid-19-economic-impacts-on-women

United Nations (2021), The 17 goals, https://sdgs.un.org/goals

Welter, F. (2011), Contextualizing entrepreneurship – conceptual challenges and ways forward, Entrepreneurship, Theory and Practice, Vol. 35 No. 1, pp. 165-184.

Wood, B. P., Ng, P. Y., & Bastian, B. L. (2021). Hegemonic Conceptualizations of Empowerment in Entrepreneurship and Their Suitability for Collective Contexts. Administrative Sciences11(1), 28.

World Bank (2019), World Bank Group Gender Strategy (FY16–23): Gender Equality, Poverty Reduction and Inclusive Growth, Retrieved. On 7.10.2019, from:  http://documents.worldbank.org/curated/en/820851467992505410/World-Bank-Group-gender-strategyFY16-23-gender-equality-poverty-reduction-and-inclusive-growth (accessed on 7 October 2019).

Dr. Bettina Lynda Bastian
Dr. Haya Al Dajani
Prof. Dr. Beverly Dawn Metcalfe
Dr. Poh Yen Ng
Dr. Bronwyn P Wood
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SDGs
  • sustainable development
  • women entrepreneurship
  • sustainable entrepreneurship
  • gender
  • women
  • gender equality
  • development
  • human potential
  • humane entrepreneurship
  • poverty alleviation
  • human well-being

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 321 KiB  
Article
Women, Entrepreneurship, and Sustainability: The Case of Saudi Arabia
by Nadia A. Abdelmegeed Abdelwahed, Bettina Lynda Bastian and Bronwyn P. Wood
Sustainability 2022, 14(18), 11314; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141811314 - 9 Sep 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2953
Abstract
We ran two focus groups with well-educated Saudi women; there were ten participants with established businesses and ten nascent entrepreneurs. Despite the Saudi Vision 2030’s centring of environmental sustainability as a key tenet of the country’s development, the women entrepreneurs we studied (both [...] Read more.
We ran two focus groups with well-educated Saudi women; there were ten participants with established businesses and ten nascent entrepreneurs. Despite the Saudi Vision 2030’s centring of environmental sustainability as a key tenet of the country’s development, the women entrepreneurs we studied (both established and nascent) were not well informed on the topic. Further, the well-educated women in our sample were under pressure from neither their customers nor their own religious, financial, or moral imperatives to engage in sustainable practices or seek out and implement sustainable business in any form. Our respondents believed that government should incentivise businesses to undertake sustainable practices and saw no financial benefits to initiating these practices themselves. Contrary to previous literature, we found that the women entrepreneurs in our sample did not perceive sustainability as an entrepreneurial opportunity and, in many cases, did not believe that sustainability should be an intrinsic element of any for-profit business. Our research findings imply that the prevalent top-down policy approach used by the government to promote sustainable entrepreneurial practices needs to be complimented by a more inclusive multi-actor approach that would involve local and national stakeholders. Moreover, educational policies need to promote the integration of sustainability topics within the larger educational system to promote awareness and social change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs)
31 pages, 7133 KiB  
Article
Women Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Development: Bibliometric Analysis and Emerging Research Trends
by Raghu Raman, Nava Subramaniam, Vinith Kumar Nair, Avinash Shivdas, Krishnashree Achuthan and Prema Nedungadi
Sustainability 2022, 14(15), 9160; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159160 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 35 | Viewed by 10409
Abstract
Women entrepreneurship has attracted the attention of academics and practitioners with a large body of research studies in recent years. Past literature reviews on women entrepreneurship have been criticized for their limited scope, lack of interdisciplinary perspective, and the need for more objective, [...] Read more.
Women entrepreneurship has attracted the attention of academics and practitioners with a large body of research studies in recent years. Past literature reviews on women entrepreneurship have been criticized for their limited scope, lack of interdisciplinary perspective, and the need for more objective, technology-facilitated analytical methods. Our study provides insights into the development of women entrepreneurship research, including a new analysis through the lens of sustainable development and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Bibliometric indicators and a systematic literature review approach are used to analyze literature published between 1991 and 2021 to better map the development of research and related opportunities for enhancing studies on women entrepreneurship. In addition to traditional bibliometric indicators such as publications, citations, etc., we used altmetrics, a new metric to assess the engagement and impact of publications based on social media presence. The Dimensions database has been used to assemble and arrange 3157 publications on women entrepreneurship, of which 843 publications are directly aligned with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and 80 publications related to COVID-19. Our findings indicate that the top three SDG of interest to researchers are: SDG 8, decent work and economic growth; SDG 10, reducing inequalities; and SDG 5, gender equality. Within each SDG, we find concentrated studies on themes relating to the socio-political and small-medium enterprises, including family business management and gender biases, and their implications for sustainable development. Further, studies on the impact of COVID-19 reveal a significant bias towards women’s empowerment in ICT, digitization, and e-commerce while exposing the need for gender-moderated policies and governmental interventions. We offer suggestions for future studies on enabling and measuring the contributions of women’s entrepreneurship to sustainable development, including capital investments and the long-term impacts of the pandemic on women-led enterprises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs)
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21 pages, 649 KiB  
Article
Refugee Women Business Mentors: New Evidence for Women’s Empowerment
by Claire P. Street, Poh Yen Ng and Haya Al-Dajani
Sustainability 2022, 14(15), 9154; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14159154 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2849
Abstract
With over 27.1 million refugees displaced globally across national borders as a result of protracted crises, conflict, and danger, resettlement in host nations remains challenging. One approach for empowering refugee women in their host nations is to enhance their economic participation through entrepreneurship. [...] Read more.
With over 27.1 million refugees displaced globally across national borders as a result of protracted crises, conflict, and danger, resettlement in host nations remains challenging. One approach for empowering refugee women in their host nations is to enhance their economic participation through entrepreneurship. We contribute to the growing research on refugee women’s entrepreneurship by focusing on refugee women entrepreneurs as mentors to other refugee women and exploring the impact of mentoring upon the empowerment of refugee women business mentors. The aim of the study is to explore the impact of being a mentor on the empowerment of refugee women entrepreneurs settled in the United Kingdom. As such, the research question asks to what extent does being a mentor influence the empowerment of refugee women entrepreneurs. The qualitative study involved six refugee women business mentors who co-designed and led an entrepreneurship training programme for refugee women in the United Kingdom and charted their empowerment journeys through four potential empowerment junctures within the mentoring process. First, the refugee woman as a mentee, then as a member of a mentoring group, thirdly as a facilitator in the mentoring process, and finally as a reflective agent. Our contribution to the women’s entrepreneurship discipline lies in our finding that refugee women’s engagement as mentors enhanced their empowerment in ways that their entrepreneurship alone cannot. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs)
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20 pages, 351 KiB  
Article
Emotions and Resilience in Saudi Women’s Digital Entrepreneurship during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Ghada Talat Alhothali and Haya Al-Dajani
Sustainability 2022, 14(14), 8794; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14148794 - 18 Jul 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2881
Abstract
The adoption of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 5 on gender equality and the growth in the number of women entrepreneurs in the MENA region is likely to change the rules of the game. A growing body of research is addressing this [...] Read more.
The adoption of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 5 on gender equality and the growth in the number of women entrepreneurs in the MENA region is likely to change the rules of the game. A growing body of research is addressing this and the factors pertaining to this growth, including digital entrepreneurship. However, little remains known about the growth and resilience of women-owned digital microbusinesses during adverse social and economic disruptions, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, in Saudi Arabia. Hence, this study explores the impact of emotions on the resilience of women entrepreneurs in “Saudi Arabia in transformation”, to explore the impact this has on shaping the digital entrepreneurship journeys of women entrepreneurs. A qualitative longitudinal approach was utilized to capture the processual nature of entrepreneurship during crises, and the broaden-and-build theory offered the theoretical framing for the study. Of the eight women-owned digital microbusinesses participating in this study, six survived the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings show that digital entrepreneurship contributed to sustaining microbusinesses during adversity, and entrepreneurs motivated by passion are also infused with positive emotions and positive thoughts and actions, empowering their resilience, despite the adversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs)
25 pages, 590 KiB  
Article
Institutional Barriers and Facilitators of Sustainability for Indonesian Batik SMEs: A Policy Agenda
by Arien Arianti Gunawan, Jose Bloemer, Allard C. R. van Riel and Caroline Essers
Sustainability 2022, 14(14), 8772; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14148772 - 18 Jul 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2904
Abstract
The implementation of sustainability-oriented practices in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) has been discussed frequently over the years. Recent studies on sustainability have focused mainly on links between ecological and economic sustainability. This exploratory study aims to explore institutional barriers and facilitators regarding [...] Read more.
The implementation of sustainability-oriented practices in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) has been discussed frequently over the years. Recent studies on sustainability have focused mainly on links between ecological and economic sustainability. This exploratory study aims to explore institutional barriers and facilitators regarding the implementation of sustainability-oriented practices in the Indonesian batik industry and to provide policy recommendations. The Indonesian batik industry is well-known for its cultural heritage and for being part of the Indonesian identity. Batik products are mostly hand-crafted by women crafters. The study used in-depth insights from two focus groups conducted with entrepreneurs active in the batik industry, while also building on earlier empirical insights. The lack of customer knowledge and socio-cultural and regulatory factors were found to be barriers to sustainability in batik SMEs. Ecological, technological, socio-cultural, and political factors were found to facilitate achieving sustainability objectives. This study contributes to the sustainable entrepreneurship and women entrepreneurship literature by considering facilitators and barriers as they are experienced by batik entrepreneurs and by furthering the conceptualization of sustainable entrepreneurs as either “committed” or “followers”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs)
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19 pages, 301 KiB  
Article
Supporting Sustainable Development Goal 5 Gender Equality and Entrepreneurship in the Tanzanite Mine-to-Market
by Janice Ann Denoncourt
Sustainability 2022, 14(7), 4192; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14074192 - 1 Apr 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4109
Abstract
This article analyses how a strategy for Tanzania’s tanzanite gemstone mining sector could foster gender equality in the mine-to-market (M2M) supply chain, whilst enhancing opportunities for female entrepreneurship as part of the country’s sustainable economic development. In the mining industry, the contemporary concept [...] Read more.
This article analyses how a strategy for Tanzania’s tanzanite gemstone mining sector could foster gender equality in the mine-to-market (M2M) supply chain, whilst enhancing opportunities for female entrepreneurship as part of the country’s sustainable economic development. In the mining industry, the contemporary concept of mapping artisanal and small-scale mining to the UN Sustainable Development Goals is a newer aspect of sustainability. SDG 5 aims to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. However, while there have been initiatives to support gemstone mining in Tanzania and East Africa, to date, the role of women in the lucrative tanzanite M2M supply chain has been less visible and a missed opportunity. This is a concern, as in 2019, pre-COVID-19 pandemic, gemstone and precious metals accounted for an incredible 33.2% of Tanzania’s total exports. In contrast, in leading mining countries such as Australia and Canada, the participation of women continues to steadily advance, economically empowering the women involved. This article contributes a critical review of Tanzanian mining regulation and licensing practice in a historical and gender equality context. A qualitative research case study showcases artisanal small-scale (ASM) tanzanite gemstone miner and entrepreneur Pili Hussein, with a view to support the formulation of a Tanzanian regional, female-oriented, M2M tanzanite strategy. The developed world experience of increasing levels of gender participation in mining provides evidence of a reduced gender pay gap and enhanced mine safety practice when women are involved. This research finds that increased investment in supporting women to participate in the tanzanite M2M gemstone supply chain positively impacts SDG 5 in the country. Furthermore, given Tanzania’s economic dependence on mining and the exceptional characteristics of rare, single-source tanzanite (a generational gemstones), we conclude that gender equality and female mine-to-market (M2M) entrepreneurship has an undervalued, yet important, role to play in Tanzania’s future socio-economic development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs)
14 pages, 7081 KiB  
Article
Does National Gender Equality Matter? Gender Difference in the Relationship between Entrepreneurial Human Capital and Entrepreneurial Intention
by Hyewon Kong and Hyosun Kim
Sustainability 2022, 14(2), 928; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14020928 - 14 Jan 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2612
Abstract
Gender equality contributes to economic growth and social progress by promoting women’s social and economic participation. The national gender equality level can affect women’s education and opportunities for economic participation. In this work, we examine whether entrepreneurial human capital (entrepreneurial education and experience) [...] Read more.
Gender equality contributes to economic growth and social progress by promoting women’s social and economic participation. The national gender equality level can affect women’s education and opportunities for economic participation. In this work, we examine whether entrepreneurial human capital (entrepreneurial education and experience) affects entrepreneurial intention and whether these relationships depend on gender and a country’s gender equality level. We used Global Entrepreneurship Trend Report (GETR) data provided by the Korean Entrepreneurship Foundation. The global survey was conducted by the Korean National Statistical Office in 2016. The data were collected from 20 countries, including Korea, and contain at least 2000 individual responses from each country. We used HLM analysis with the HLM 6.0 program to examine the hypotheses. Our results show that entrepreneurship education increases entrepreneurial intention, and that the relationship is stronger among women than men. We also found that for women, the positive relationship between entrepreneurial education and entrepreneurial intention is stronger in countries with lower gender equality. As for prior entrepreneurial experience, neither gender nor national gender equality level moderated the relationship between experience and entrepreneurial intention. This study contributes to the extension of entrepreneurship theory, especially in the area of women entrepreneurship. We confirm that entrepreneurial human capital contributes to entrepreneurial intention, and that gender and national gender equality level comprise an important social context that influences the effects of education and experience on the entrepreneurial intention of women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women Entrepreneurship and the UN SDGs)
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