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Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2023) | Viewed by 64407

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Portugal ISPA–Instituto Universitário, Universidade de Aveirodisabled, Aveiro, R. Jardim do Tabaco 34, 1149-041 Lisbon, Portugal
2. Instituto Superior Manuel Teixeira Gomes, Portimão, Portugal
Interests: organizational behavior; human resources management; organizational psychology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. ISPA – Instituto Universitário, R. Jardim do Tabaco 34, 1149-041 Lisboa, Portugal
2. Atlântica Instituto Universitário, Estrada do Cacém, 2730-036 Barcarena, Portugal
3. Centro de Administração e Políticas Públicas, Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Políticas, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: organizational behavior; human resources management

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Guest Editor
1. ISPA – Instituto Universitário, R. Jardim do Tabaco 34, 1149-041 Lisboa, Portugal
2. APPsyCI—Applied Psychology Research Center Capabilities & Inclusion - ISPA – Instituto Universitário, Lisboa, Portugal
3. Centro de Administração e Políticas Públicas, Instituto Superior de Ciências Sociais e Políticas, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: organizational behavior; human resources management; organizational psychology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 2030 Agenda of the United Nations (UN) is composed of 17 SDGs and was approved in 2015. Examples of such goals are to eradicate poverty (SDG1), to promote good health and well-being (SDG3), and to stop global warming (SDG13). In addition, sustainable development is to be based on three fundamental pillars. This is known as the triple bottom line (TBL) perspective. They are economic sustainability, focused on liquidity and profit; social sustainability, orientated towards people and society with an ethical concern; and environmental sustainability, related to our planet and its resources. Addressing sustainable development at these three levels will promote a shared vision for humanity, eradicating poverty, protecting the environment, and promoting the prosperity and well-being of all. For over 30 years now, the UN has emphasized the role of economic agents, especially organizations, in contributing to sustainable development, and since 2015 in pursuing and implementing the 17 SDGs.  Thus, organizations are more aware of their responsibility as catalysts for sustainable development, bringing it to their business models and to each of their organizational departments such as accounting, marketing, retailing, management, and lately, human resource management.

If organizations wish to actively contribute to the UN SDGs, they need to engage their workforces in global sustainable development, adopting sustainable HR practices (e.g., Shen & Benson, 2016) and changing the existing HR paradigm (Dyllick & Muff, 2016). 

Based on human resources management as a change agent as well as a strategic partner, it will adopt an increasing responsibility as an agent to optimize employees’ attitudes and behaviors so that more sustainable growth is attained and so that workforces adopt more sustainable mindsets and cultures and act as a powerful force to influence other actors outside organizations’ boundaries.

To act accordingly, organizations and HR departments must be aware of the predictors, outcomes, and contextual variables that may impact sustainable HRM. Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to collect research regarding phenomena that may influence sustainable HRM. We accept both quantitative and qualitative original papers, as well as literature reviews.

Prof. Dr. Ana Maria da Palma Moreira
Prof. Dr. Francisco Cesário
Prof. Dr. Ana Sabino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable human resources management
  • performance
  • environmental commitment
  • engagement
  • turnover intentions
  • job satisfaction
  • person-organization fit
  • person-job fit
  • work–life balance
  • leadership
  • citizenship work behaviours, personality
  • organizational culture
  • fun at work
  • employee silence and voice: motivation

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 524 KiB  
Article
Causal Model Analysis of the Effects of Civil Servants’ Perceived Formalism, Green Conscientiousness, and Moral Reflectiveness on Green Behavior
by Tsung-Lin Wu and Hsiang-Te Liu
Sustainability 2023, 15(7), 5772; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15075772 - 26 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1235
Abstract
The green behavior of civil servants in the workplace is influenced by personal moral reflectiveness and green conscientiousness. Group discussions and initiatives within organizations can also influence individual green behavior. Civil servants with greener lifestyles are more likely to demonstrate green behaviors. This [...] Read more.
The green behavior of civil servants in the workplace is influenced by personal moral reflectiveness and green conscientiousness. Group discussions and initiatives within organizations can also influence individual green behavior. Civil servants with greener lifestyles are more likely to demonstrate green behaviors. This study specifically explores the impact of civil servants’ ritualized performance appraisals and formalism perception on moral reflectiveness and green advocacy. In this study, a sample of 250 civil servants was obtained by means of convenience sampling. This article applies confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to test research hypotheses. The results of the study found that ritualized performance appraisals positively affect perceived formalism. Perceived formalism negatively affects moral reflectiveness and green advocacy. Green lifestyles and green advocacy positively affect green behavior. Moral reflectiveness mediates the relationship between green conscientiousness and green behavior. This study confirms the influence of moral reflectiveness, green conscientiousness, green lifestyles, and green advocacy on green behavior. This study also found that ritualized performance appraisals and perceived formalism have negative effects on green behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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30 pages, 2678 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Development of Employee Lifecycle Management in the Age of Global Challenges: Evidence from China, Russia, and Indonesia
by Hua Xiang, Jie Lu, Mikhail E. Kosov, Maria V. Volkova, Vadim V. Ponkratov, Andrey I. Masterov, Izabella D. Elyakova, Sergey Yu. Popkov, Denis Yu. Taburov, Natalia V. Lazareva, Iskandar Muda, Marina V. Vasiljeva and Angelina O. Zekiy
Sustainability 2023, 15(6), 4987; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15064987 - 10 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4187
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected the employee lifecycle management (ELM) sphere, leading to the adoption of new human resource (HR) technologies and policies. This study investigates the impact of megatrends, artificial intelligence, digital technologies, and innovation on ELM and human resource management [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected the employee lifecycle management (ELM) sphere, leading to the adoption of new human resource (HR) technologies and policies. This study investigates the impact of megatrends, artificial intelligence, digital technologies, and innovation on ELM and human resource management (HRM) policies in China, Russia, and Indonesia. Data were collected through structured interviews and publicly available information from companies in these countries between 2021 and 2022. The study evaluates the effects of artificial intelligence (AI), digital transformation (DT), and innovations on the sustainable development of ELM and identifies differences in technological responses to ELM in companies depending on their level of digital maturity. The results show that the majority of companies have continued the process of ELM digital transformation, but the percentage varies based on the scope of activity, labor, and readiness of the country to implement new technologies. The study reveals that large companies in each analyzed country with over 10,000 employees have a greater need and opportunity to implement HR digital transformation, whereas small companies with up to 100 people can operate without automation. In addition, the findings of this study provide propositions for designing how AI and innovations contribute to ELM. This article contributes to the current debate in the literature by substantiating the positive impact of AI, digital technology, and innovation on ELM and HRM strategies, offering practical applications for companies to improve productivity. Overall, this study highlights the importance of adopting innovative HR technologies in response to global challenges and workplace trends. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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16 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
Is There a Right Way to Lay Off Employees in Times of Crisis?: The Role of Organizational Justice in the Case of Airbnb
by Sanghyun Lee, Sounman Hong and Bong Gyou Lee
Sustainability 2023, 15(5), 4690; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15054690 - 6 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3467
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected the tourism and services sector. Using the example of Airbnb’s recent layoff of 25% of its workforce, we focused on the role of organizational justice in mitigating the negative psychological impacts of layoffs. Based on a unique [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected the tourism and services sector. Using the example of Airbnb’s recent layoff of 25% of its workforce, we focused on the role of organizational justice in mitigating the negative psychological impacts of layoffs. Based on a unique survey of Airbnb employees who survived the layoffs, as well as those who left, we employed an ordinary least squares regression to show that employees’ perceptions of organizational justice were positively related to their job satisfaction and trust in management, while being negatively related to their emotional exhaustion and cynicism. We discovered the crucial importance of interactional justice (i.e., interpersonal and informational justice). The respect, dignity, and politeness shown by management (i.e., interpersonal justice), as well as truthful and adequate communication about the procedure (i.e., informational justice) were pivotal to successfully conducting layoffs, especially during unprecedented economic uncertainty. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
21 pages, 1310 KiB  
Article
The Future Is Hybrid: How Organisations Are Designing and Supporting Sustainable Hybrid Work Models in Post-Pandemic Australia
by John Hopkins and Anne Bardoel
Sustainability 2023, 15(4), 3086; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15043086 - 8 Feb 2023
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 21876
Abstract
Hybrid work models have rapidly become the most common work arrangement for many knowledge workers, affording them with improved work–life balance and greater levels of job satisfaction, but little research has been conducted to identify the different hybrid work models that are emerging, [...] Read more.
Hybrid work models have rapidly become the most common work arrangement for many knowledge workers, affording them with improved work–life balance and greater levels of job satisfaction, but little research has been conducted to identify the different hybrid work models that are emerging, and the appropriate supports needed to drive sustainable improvement. This paper utilises primary data from a series of semi-structured interviews with senior Australian human resource (HR) managers, to identify a range of different approaches to hybrid work design, applying the Conservation of Resources (COR) theory. Analyses of these findings have resulted in five key contributions: one being the identification of the most popular current hybrid work arrangements; the second being the key supporting pillars that are required to support successful hybrid work; the third identifies the infrastructure required to support these pillars; the fourth being a theoretic contribution that extends the existing academic literature in this field; and with the final contribution being an interpretation of the findings via COR theory. These contributions have significant implications for both scholars and human resource professionals, as organisations and academics strive to learn from the recent period of turbulence and develop sustainable improvements in performance and working conditions (SDG8), with improved support for employee health and wellbeing (SDG3), and gender equality (SDG5). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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18 pages, 1003 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Green Human Resources Management Practices on Employees’ Affective Commitment and Work Engagement: The Moderating Role of Employees’ Biospheric Value
by Jorge F. S. Gomes, Ana Sabino and Vanessa Antunes
Sustainability 2023, 15(3), 2190; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15032190 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4487
Abstract
Organizational Sustainability is an increasingly important movement in the business world because of its social impact and also for the obligations imposed by state agendas and programs by global entities, such as the United Nations. At the forefront of such a movement is [...] Read more.
Organizational Sustainability is an increasingly important movement in the business world because of its social impact and also for the obligations imposed by state agendas and programs by global entities, such as the United Nations. At the forefront of such a movement is the Human Resources function, given its boundary activities with several critical internal and external stakeholders. The term Green Human Resource Management (GHRM) has been used to describe people management with a focus on green issues. The main objective of this research was to explore the relationship between personal values associated with sustainable behaviors (altruistic, biospheric, egoistic, and hedonic values), organizational outcomes such as engagement and commitment, and GHRM. A questionnaire was prepared and used to collect 532 responses from employees from various organizations. Results show that of the four personal values only the biospheric one moderates the relationship between GHRM practices and affective commitment so that the relationship between HRM and affective commitment is stronger when biospheric values score higher. This is an important finding, as it shows that when people value the biosphere, the effect of GHRM practices on affective commitment and work engagement is stronger than when people value other matters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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13 pages, 523 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Impact of Psychological Contract Violation on Survivors’ Turnover Intention under the Downsizing Context: A Moderated Mediation Mechanism
by Hao Lv, Guofeng Wang, Muhammad Waleed Ayub Ghouri and Zhuohang Deng
Sustainability 2023, 15(3), 1770; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15031770 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1665
Abstract
In the light of social exchange theory, our study aimed to explore the impact of psychological contract violation on survivors’ turnover intention, specifically in a downsizing context. We put forth a moderated mediation model to uncover the mediating role of organizational commitment, as [...] Read more.
In the light of social exchange theory, our study aimed to explore the impact of psychological contract violation on survivors’ turnover intention, specifically in a downsizing context. We put forth a moderated mediation model to uncover the mediating role of organizational commitment, as well as the boundary conditions of organizational support and emotional susceptibility as a moderating mechanism. To test our hypotheses, we surveyed 202 out of 271 layoff survivors belonging to the stores of an established manufacturing and retail footwear business in the southwest region of China. The study found a positive relationship between psychological contract violation and the survivors’ turnover intention. In addition, organizational commitment has been identified as a powerful mediator between psychological contract violation and turnover intention. This study, however, only explores how organizational support significantly moderates the mediating effect of organizational commitment in regard to psychological contract violation and turnover intention. This study helps organizational practitioners to ensure sound management practices for employees, in order to get rid of adverse consequences evinced through individuals’ negative emotions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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19 pages, 1112 KiB  
Article
Potential of Passive Employees: How Servant Leadership Can Stimulate Innovation among Control-Oriented Employees
by Ziyang Qiang, Jigan Wang, Kaiyuan He and Lin Xu
Sustainability 2023, 15(1), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15010144 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2421
Abstract
Depending on the organizational context, a control orientation on the part of an employee may either inhibit or promote their innovative job performance. To explore the question of which external conditions are conducive to control-oriented employees’ innovative potential, this study examined the effects [...] Read more.
Depending on the organizational context, a control orientation on the part of an employee may either inhibit or promote their innovative job performance. To explore the question of which external conditions are conducive to control-oriented employees’ innovative potential, this study examined the effects of servant leadership on control-oriented employees’ motivation internalization processes and innovative job performance from a self-determination theory perspective. This study was conducted in Jiangsu, Shanghai, and Anhui provinces, which are relatively developed high-tech industries in China. An analysis of paired data from 298 employees and their leaders in nine technology-intensive companies revealed that servant leadership plays a positive moderating role between control orientation and employees’ autonomous motivation. Moreover, the interaction between control orientation and servant leadership can affect innovative job performance through the mediation of identified regulation, but not through that of integrated regulation. These findings are beneficial in promoting healthy development and innovative job performance of control-oriented employees, and are instructive for sustainable human resource management. Organizations should recognize the creative potential of control-oriented employees, promote servant leadership, leverage its management strengths, and focus on enhancing employees’ sense of identification with their jobs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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18 pages, 694 KiB  
Article
Job Crafting and Job Performance: The Mediating Effect of Engagement
by Ana Moreira, Tiago Encarnação, João Viseu and Maria José Sousa
Sustainability 2022, 14(22), 14909; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142214909 - 11 Nov 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2856
Abstract
The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether work engagement mediates the relationship between job crafting and job performance. To this end, the following hypotheses were formulated: (1) job crafting establishes a positive and significant association with job performance; (2) job [...] Read more.
The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether work engagement mediates the relationship between job crafting and job performance. To this end, the following hypotheses were formulated: (1) job crafting establishes a positive and significant association with job performance; (2) job establishes a positive and significant association with work engagement; (3) work engagement establishes a positive and significant association with job performance; (4) work engagement mediates the association between job crafting and job performance. The sample was composed of 453 participants working in organisations based in Portugal. The hypotheses formulated in this study were tested by performing simple and multiple linear regressions. The results indicated that only increasing structural job resources and increasing challenging job demands established a positive and significant association with task performance. Increasing structural job resources, increasing social job resources, and increasing challenging job demands established a positive and significant association with citizenship performance and work engagement. Work engagement established a positive and significant association with task performance and citizenship performance. Only a partial mediating effect, through work engagement, was observed on the association between increasing challenging job demands and task performance, and between increasing social job resources and citizenship performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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31 pages, 2362 KiB  
Article
The Relationship among Four Lifestyles of Workers amid the COVID-19 Pandemic (Work–Life Balance, YOLO, Minimal Life, and Staycation) and Organizational Effectiveness: With a Focus on Four Countries
by Joon-ho Kim, Seung-hye Jung, Bong-ihn Seok and Hyun-ju Choi
Sustainability 2022, 14(21), 14059; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142114059 - 28 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2561
Abstract
This study empirically analyzes the effects of four lifestyles of office workers (work and life balance, you only live once (YOLO), minimal life, and staycation), which have been changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, on organizational effectiveness (measured by job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and [...] Read more.
This study empirically analyzes the effects of four lifestyles of office workers (work and life balance, you only live once (YOLO), minimal life, and staycation), which have been changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, on organizational effectiveness (measured by job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and organizational citizenship behavior). A questionnaire survey was conducted over four months through a global research firm. In total, 649 valid questionnaires were collected. A structural equation model analysis was performed on valid samples using SmartPLS statistics. The results were as follows: (1) Work and life balance, YOLO, and minimal life had a statistically significant positive effect on job satisfaction. (2) Minimal life had a statistically significant positive effect on organizational commitment. (3) Work and life balance, and staycation had statistically significant positive effects on organizational citizenship behavior. (4) Job satisfaction had a statistically significant positive effect on organizational commitment. (5) Job satisfaction and organizational commitment had a statistically significant positive effect on organizational citizenship behavior. This is the first empirical study to focus on four lifestyles (work–life balance, YOLO, minimal life, and staycation). The results show that job satisfaction was affected the most by YOLO,’ that organizational commitment was affected the most by minimal life, and that organizational citizenship behavior was affected the most by work–life balance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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25 pages, 1219 KiB  
Article
No Place for Pointless Jobs: How Social Responsibility Impacts Job Performance
by Marc Scholten, Manuela Faia Correia, Teresa Esteves and Sónia P. Gonçalves
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12031; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912031 - 23 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1840
Abstract
We address the question of how organizations’ practices of social responsibility impact their employees’ job performance. Independent studies have shown that job performance is influenced by how employees perceive the organization they work for and how they perceive the work they perform for [...] Read more.
We address the question of how organizations’ practices of social responsibility impact their employees’ job performance. Independent studies have shown that job performance is influenced by how employees perceive the organization they work for and how they perceive the work they perform for the organization. Moreover, studies on the relationship between social responsibility and job performance have shown that employees’ perceptions of their organization mediate the relationship. What is thus far neglected, however, is whether and how their perceptions of work itself mediate the relationship as well. We derive a sequential mediation model according to which social responsibility improves job performance by contributing to a supportive and trustworthy work context (employees’ perceptions of the organization they work for), in turn promoting work meaningfulness and engagement (employees’ perceptions of work itself). We collect survey data and test the sequential mediation model against a series of alternative models, each of which challenges a specific assumption of the proposed model. Our model provides the best tradeoff between the accuracy and the parsimony with which it describes the data collected, and is, therefore, expected to generalize best to other data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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17 pages, 333 KiB  
Article
Internships with Portuguese Speakers: Leadership, Organisational Culture and the Current Brain Drain
by Matilde Macedo, Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, Cicero Eduardo Walter and Ana Moreira
Sustainability 2022, 14(17), 10776; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141710776 - 29 Aug 2022
Viewed by 1800
Abstract
Doing internships is increasingly common in Portugal, often being regarded as a prerequisite for entering the labour market. This trend reinforces the need to understand the interns’ perception of the ideal characteristics for this type of experience, in order to stop (or at [...] Read more.
Doing internships is increasingly common in Portugal, often being regarded as a prerequisite for entering the labour market. This trend reinforces the need to understand the interns’ perception of the ideal characteristics for this type of experience, in order to stop (or at least slow down) the brain drain that is currently felt. This exploratory research aims at reflecting on how organisations can contribute to successful internships. Themes such as the leadership and organisational culture of the host entity are addressed, areas which have been debated less often in the current literature. Our quantitative research was based on a survey, which obtained 143 responses from individuals with internship experience. Data were analysed using descriptive, reliability, inferential, and multiple linear regression analysis. The results from this study showcased a tendency toward servant leadership (in detriment to paternalistic or autocratic leadership) as being the most appropriate leadership style for an internship. It was also possible to emphasise some important points in an internship experience, including remuneration (desired by the interns) and the tasks performed (the interns want to be given responsibilities and meaningful work during their internship). Some of the results obtained are according to the state-of-the-art, however, others diverge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
15 pages, 1005 KiB  
Article
A Cross-Sectional Study on Ethical Buyer Behavior towards Cruelty-Free Cosmetics: What Consequences for Female Leadership Practices?
by José Magano, Manuel Au-Yong-Oliveira, Bruna Ferreira and Ângela Leite
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 7786; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137786 - 26 Jun 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 7518
Abstract
This study extends the theory of planned behavior model and examines the humane factors (altruism, environmental knowledge, personal appearance concerns, attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms) that shape attitudes and buyer behavior toward cruelty-free cosmetics and the consumer characteristics that reflect their [...] Read more.
This study extends the theory of planned behavior model and examines the humane factors (altruism, environmental knowledge, personal appearance concerns, attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norms) that shape attitudes and buyer behavior toward cruelty-free cosmetics and the consumer characteristics that reflect their behavior toward such products. Recent global occurrences have affected human behavioral patterns, namely, the COVID-19 pandemic, which we aim to study. Has behavior changed to become more ethical? A survey was carried out involving a sample of 425 Portuguese participants (a feminine culture), following a convenience- and snowball-sampling procedure. Significant correlations were found between environmental knowledge, subjective norms, and buyer behavior toward cruelty-free cosmetics with attitude and environmental knowledge and buyer behavior. Through structural equation modeling to evaluate the conceptual model, a good model fit was found, being that standardized values in the model are significant except for regressions from perceived behavior control and personal appearance concerns to buyer behavior toward cruelty-free cosmetics. Women present higher values than men on attitude, altruism, environmental knowledge, and buyer behavior, in line with what is expected in a traditional and conservative feminine culture such as that to be found in Portugal. Such a result points to the need to promote increased gender equality, for example, in senior leadership roles, as women are seen to have the desirable qualities required for a more sustainable, cruelty-free, and humane society. This is an alert for human-resource managers in the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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14 pages, 460 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Green Human Resource Management on Organizational Citizenship Behaviors: The Mediating Role of Organizational Identification and Job Satisfaction
by Carla Freire and Pietra Pieta
Sustainability 2022, 14(13), 7557; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14137557 - 21 Jun 2022
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 4007
Abstract
The main aim of this study is to analyze the impact of green human resource management on organizational citizenship behavior through the mediating role of organizational identification and job satisfaction in Portuguese companies certified by ISO 14001. A survey was applied to a [...] Read more.
The main aim of this study is to analyze the impact of green human resource management on organizational citizenship behavior through the mediating role of organizational identification and job satisfaction in Portuguese companies certified by ISO 14001. A survey was applied to a sample of 120 collaborators who work in ISO 14001 certified Portuguese industrial companies. Results indicate that there is a mediation model, which uses the effect of job satisfaction in the relationship between green human resource management and its impact on organizational citizenship behavior. This study proves to be important when understanding the individual effects caused by a green human resource management system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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13 pages, 776 KiB  
Article
Students’ Motivation for a Sustainable Career in the Hospitality Industry in Portugal
by Francisco Cesário, Ana Sabino, Ana Moreira, Miguel Portugal and Antónia Correia
Sustainability 2022, 14(11), 6522; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14116522 - 26 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2859
Abstract
Based on the intersection between Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 “Quality Education” and SDG 8 “Decent Work and Economic Growth”, the main purpose of this study, framed by the self-determination theory, was to identify the relationship between the factors that motivate students to [...] Read more.
Based on the intersection between Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 4 “Quality Education” and SDG 8 “Decent Work and Economic Growth”, the main purpose of this study, framed by the self-determination theory, was to identify the relationship between the factors that motivate students to pursue a career in the hospitality and tourism industry and their commitment to the university and to their program, guaranteeing a more sustainable career. Methodologically, a survey was used to assess students’ perceptions about their commitment to conclude their BA academic program and their time at university, and to identify the types of motivation to pursue a future career in hospitality and tourism. The study took place, with the participation of 305 students, in one of the leading Portugal universities in hospitality and tourism. By leveraging the structural equation modelling technique, we tested how extrinsic and intrinsic motivations for a career in the hospitality and tourism industry contribute to the commitment to the program and the university. Results suggested that students’ commitment to remain in the university and their commitment to conclude their BA program are mainly associated with introjected motivation. This study highlights the need to study higher education systems to boost sustainable human resources management, mainly creating bridges between education systems and industry to allow individuals to have more sustainable careers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Understanding Sustainable Human Resource Management)
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