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Special Issue "Sustainability in Transportation and the Built Environment"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Engineering and Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 January 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Justin Bishop

Arup, 13 Fitzroy St, London W1T 4BQ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: transport, built environment; electric power generation; sustainability and sustainable development

Special Issue Information

Most of us live in an urban environment. The increase in both vehicle use and urbanization will result in more of us being exposed to long-term harmful, transport-related emissions. There are additional externalities, such as noise, congestion and accidents, which affect human health and well-being. However, motorized transport is necessary for the city, supporting flows of people and goods over medium to long distances. Moreover, efficient and affordable transport links are essential for ensuring fair access to opportunities for citizens across the socio-economic spectrum. The challenge remains how to deliver cities which can grow economically, remain well-connected and be attractive and healthy places to live.

This Special Issue is focused on real-world case studies demonstrating solutions to overcome this challenge. Examples include technology and/or policy interventions in vehicles, fuels, network operation, building fabrics, urban/land use planning and the natural environment.

Authors should identify clearly:

  • The novelty of their approach;
  • The scale of the impact, testing for sensitivity and accounting for uncertainty;
  • How unintended consequences and problem shifting may be accounted for and mitigated;
  • Gaps in technology or policy necessary to deliver the research outcomes; and
  • The relevance of the research outcomes to other cities.

Dr. Justin Bishop
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • sustainable development
  • air quality
  • human health and well-being
  • externalities
  • buildings and materials
  • urban planning
  • natural environment
  • vehicles
  • public transport
  • freight

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Noise Indicators for Size Distributions of Airborne Particles and Traffic Activities in Urban Areas
Sustainability 2018, 10(12), 4599; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10124599
Received: 6 November 2018 / Revised: 25 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 5 December 2018
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among the particle number concentration (PNC), noise, and traffic conditions. Field measurements were conducted to measure the temporal variabilities of the noise levels and PNC over 24 h in a location adjacent to
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The aim of this study was to explore the relationships among the particle number concentration (PNC), noise, and traffic conditions. Field measurements were conducted to measure the temporal variabilities of the noise levels and PNC over 24 h in a location adjacent to three main traffic roads in Seoul, Korea. The PNC was measured in the range of 0.3 to 10 µm. The noise data was measured by utilizing both the overall levels and spectral characteristics. Traffic data including volumes and speeds of vehicles on the roads were also collected. The results showed that the correlations among the three key parameters varied depending on changes in the noise frequency and particle size. The noise levels at 100–200 Hz were positively correlated with traffic volume and submicron particles. In contrast, they exhibited inverse correlations with the traffic speed and the number of larger particles (>2.5 µm). Compared to noise levels at 100–200 Hz, noise levels at 1–2 kHz exhibited reverse relationships between the traffic and PNC. Submicron particles (0.3–1.0 µm) tended to be more strongly associated with noise levels during the daytime, while those greater than 2.5 µm maintained relatively stable correlations with the noise throughout the day. The findings address the importance of temporal and spectral-specific monitoring of air and noise pollutants for a better understanding of the exposure of the community to air and noise pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Transportation and the Built Environment)
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Open AccessArticle Prediction of Life Cycle Carbon Emissions of Sponge City Projects: A Case Study in Shanghai, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(11), 3978; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10113978
Received: 1 October 2018 / Revised: 22 October 2018 / Accepted: 25 October 2018 / Published: 31 October 2018
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Abstract
In recent years, China has been vigorously carrying out the planning and implementation of Sponge City. Since the implementation of Sponge City projects involves substantial materials and energy consumption, it is significant to account corresponding carbon emissions and sinks. The existed studies about
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In recent years, China has been vigorously carrying out the planning and implementation of Sponge City. Since the implementation of Sponge City projects involves substantial materials and energy consumption, it is significant to account corresponding carbon emissions and sinks. The existed studies about carbon emission of stormwater management measures, however, are not able to take the whole life cycle and different facilities into consideration. Therefore, this study develops a comprehensive accounting model based on Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines and life cycle assessment (LCA) method to predict carbon emissions and carbon sinks of Sponge City projects more comprehensively and accurately. The model is applied to an actual residential community in Shanghai as a case study. Results show that the total indirect carbon emission is estimated to be 774,277 kg CO2 eq during a 30-year lifespan, among which carbon emissions from operation and maintenance phases are 2570 kg CO2 eq/year and 7309 kg CO2 eq/year, respectively, both directly proportional to the service life of the facilities. Three kinds of achievable carbon sinks are carbon sequestration in green space (5450 kg CO2 eq/year), carbon sink from rainwater utilization (15,379 kg CO2 eq/year) and carbon sink from runoff pollutant removal (19,552 kg CO2 eq/year). Carbon neutrality is expected to be reached after approximately 19 years. The established carbon emission accounting model can contribute to better planning and construction of Sponge City in China and enhance further energy conservation and carbon emission reduction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Transportation and the Built Environment)
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Open AccessArticle Karst Development Mechanism and Characteristics Based on Comprehensive Exploration along Jinan Metro, China
Sustainability 2018, 10(10), 3383; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10103383
Received: 28 August 2018 / Revised: 17 September 2018 / Accepted: 19 September 2018 / Published: 21 September 2018
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Abstract
Jinan is the capital of Shandong Province and is famous for its spring water. Water conservation has become the consensus of Jinan citizens and the government and the community. The construction of metro engineering in Jinan has lagged behind other cities of the
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Jinan is the capital of Shandong Province and is famous for its spring water. Water conservation has become the consensus of Jinan citizens and the government and the community. The construction of metro engineering in Jinan has lagged behind other cities of the same scale for a long time. The key issue is the protection of spring water. When metro lines are constructed in Jinan karst area, the water-inrushing, quicksand, and piping hazards can easily occur, which can change the groundwater seepage environment and reduce spring discharge. Therefore, we try to reveal the development conditions, mechanism, and mode of karst area in Jinan. In addition, we propose the comprehensive optimizing method of “shallow-deep” and “region-target” suitable for exploration of karst areas along Jinan metro, and systematically study the development characteristics of the karst areas along Jinan metro, thus providing the basis for the shield tunnel to go through karst areas safely and protecting the springs in Jinan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Transportation and the Built Environment)
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Open AccessArticle Multi-Criteria Life Cycle Approach to Develop Weighting of Sustainability Indicators for Pavement
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2325; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072325
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 29 June 2018 / Accepted: 2 July 2018 / Published: 5 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1238 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the past decade, sustainable practices have been adopted in transportation infrastructure projects to reduce adverse environmental effects. To evaluate the sustainability levels of engineering projects holistically, rating systems have been developed to assess and reward points based on various sustainable best practices
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In the past decade, sustainable practices have been adopted in transportation infrastructure projects to reduce adverse environmental effects. To evaluate the sustainability levels of engineering projects holistically, rating systems have been developed to assess and reward points based on various sustainable best practices (indicators). This study aimed to establish a systematic methodology to weight indicators related to materials and resources most commonly used by various transportation infrastructure rating systems based on their contributions to sustainability. A multi-criteria approach for assessing the indicators based on three criteria, indicator performance, environment, and cost, was designed. The criteria were then used to evaluate the indicators and assessed points based on their contributions toward sustainability. Results revealed that state-of-the-art engineering practices could differentiate weighting of points from the typical linear point increase that is traditionally used. In addition, a maximum cap is crucial to ensure that some indicators do not end up being weighted disproportionately. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Transportation and the Built Environment)
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Open AccessArticle Built Environment and Parking Availability: Impacts on Car Ownership and Use
Sustainability 2018, 10(7), 2285; https://doi.org/10.3390/su10072285
Received: 27 May 2018 / Revised: 25 June 2018 / Accepted: 28 June 2018 / Published: 2 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1463 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Along with urbanization and economic development, the number of private cars has increased rapidly in recent years in China, which contributes to concerns about traffic congestion, hard parking, energy consumption, and emissions. This study aims to investigate the joint effect of built environment
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Along with urbanization and economic development, the number of private cars has increased rapidly in recent years in China, which contributes to concerns about traffic congestion, hard parking, energy consumption, and emissions. This study aims to investigate the joint effect of built environment and parking availability on car ownership and use based on a household travel survey conducted in Changchun, China. The binary logistic model was first employed to investigate the determinants of the car ownership in Changchun. Next, this study examined the potential impacts of the built environment and parking availability on car use for the journey to work. The result shows that built environment and parking availability can be both significantly associated with car ownership and use after controlling for the socio-economic characteristics. Moreover, in contrast with the model ignoring the parking availability, the model for car use considering the joint effect fit the data better. The results indicate that car dependency depends on the joint effect of the built environment and parking availability. These results suggest that transit-oriented urban expansion and compact land use can contribute to reducing car commuting. Meanwhile, parking restrictions at both trip start and end would be effective for sustainable transport because parking oversupply could encourage more car dependency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Transportation and the Built Environment)
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