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Sustainable Coastal Environment and Marine Science

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 7010

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural, and Environmental Engineering Department (DICEAA)—Environmental and Maritime Hydraulic Laboratory (LIAM), University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: coastal engineering; ocean engineering; environmental engineering; water waves hydraulics; physical modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural, and Environmental Engineering Department (DICEAA); Environmental and Maritime Hydraulic Laboratory (LIAM); University of L'Aquila; P.le Pontieri, 1 67100 Monteluco di Roio, L'Aquila, Italy
Interests: coastal engineering; coastal structures; ocean engineering; physical modeling; numerical modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

the research on coastal environments is one of the most interdisciplinary challenges in engineering and marine sciences. Water and sediments travel from the inland down to the downstream coastal stretches. There, river flow and fluvial sediment transport interact with wind driven waves, tidal oscillations and nearshore circulation and influence water quality and morphodynamics in the nearshore area. Protected as well as heavily anthropized areas are then prone to be influenced by water and sediments coming from so afar. In the case of urban areas, artificial hydraulic networks can also influence the nearshore area in terms of water quality.

In the last decades, the problem of coastal erosion, and the consequent coastal flooding, the problem of the water quality, the land use and transformation, the link between reservoir siltation and coastal erosion opened great research opportunities. The big deal is to manage coastal areas with particular attention paid to social, economic, and environmental sustainability. The possible impacts of climate change scenarios for the next decades on the coastal environment makes it even harder to define the most appropriate management policies to be used when sustainability must be taken into account.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect research works focused on these themes. Indeed, although great work in different research areas has been done, a huge amount of work must be done in order to answer theoretical and practical questions still open.

Research papers, interdisciplinary and extended review works, and the illustration of new technical applications are encouraged.

To point out a possible list of interesting topics for this issue, authors may refer to areas:

  • coastal erosion and coastal flooding;
  • hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of coastal areas;
  • water quality;
  • risk assessment;
  • climate change adaptation;
  • statistical analysis on the main forcing terms on the coastal environment (storm surges, wind waves etc.);
  • sustainable planning for coastal zone management;
  • interaction between coastal structures and water quality;
  • interaction between reservoir siltation and coastal erosion;
  • interaction between land use and coastal erosion.

Prof. Dr. Marcello Di Risio
Dr. Daniele Celli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal morphodynamic
  • water quality
  • urban development, land use
  • climate change
  • hydrodynamics
  • coastal structures

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 9645 KiB  
Article
Collapse of a Coastal Revetment Due to the Combined Effect of Anthropogenic and Natural Disturbances
by Jong Dae Do, Jae-Youll Jin, Weon Mu Jeong, Byunggil Lee, Jin Yong Choi and Yeon S. Chang
Sustainability 2021, 13(7), 3712; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13073712 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2607
Abstract
Coastal structures, such as revetments, are built to protect specific areas and facilities from the attack of extreme waves. However, unexpected environmental damage could be induced from these structures when inappropriately applied. Here, we present the results of measurements carried out using a [...] Read more.
Coastal structures, such as revetments, are built to protect specific areas and facilities from the attack of extreme waves. However, unexpected environmental damage could be induced from these structures when inappropriately applied. Here, we present the results of measurements carried out using a video monitoring system, indicating the rapid collapse of a coastal revetment due to the attack of storm waves. The destruction occurred in sequence; that is, it was initiated by human activities, followed by a natural disaster. First, the beach in front of the revetment was eroded, even under moderate wave conditions, because sediments transported into this area were blocked by a rip-rap jetty. After the beach width was severely reduced due to the erosion, the revetment collapsed when storm waves attacked the area. The destruction seems accidental and inevitable because it was directly caused by the storm. However, it could have been avoided by predicting and preventing the erosion due to the jetty. This study provides insights into sequential processes that lead to the failure of coastal revetments, which could be applied for prevention of similar anthropogenic disasters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Coastal Environment and Marine Science)
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24 pages, 7773 KiB  
Article
The Conservational State of Coastal Ecosystems on the Mexican Caribbean Coast: Environmental Guidelines for Their Management
by Mayrene Guimarais, Adán Zúñiga-Ríos, Cesia J. Cruz-Ramírez, Valeria Chávez, Itxaso Odériz, Brigitta I. van Tussenbroek and Rodolfo Silva
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2738; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052738 - 3 Mar 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3624
Abstract
The accelerated rate of environmental degradation of the Mexican Caribbean coast is alarming. In this work, spatial analysis procedures were applied to study relationships among wave and wind climates, water quality, and environmental degradation of the principal coastal ecosystems. We found an increasing [...] Read more.
The accelerated rate of environmental degradation of the Mexican Caribbean coast is alarming. In this work, spatial analysis procedures were applied to study relationships among wave and wind climates, water quality, and environmental degradation of the principal coastal ecosystems. We found an increasing North-South gradient in the preservation state of the coastal ecosystems, related to the degree of anthropization of the coastline. In the north, all analysed stressors exert high pressure on coral reefs, seagrass meadows, mangroves, and dunes, and cause chronic coastline erosion. The coastal ecosystems of the central and southern regions are more mature and healthier, and the most significant stressor is reduced water quality. The north has been most hit by high-intensity hurricanes, the frequency of which has increased in the Mexican Caribbean over recent decades. The status of conservation of the ecosystems, added to the long-term intensification of environmental pressures, particularly high-intensity hurricanes, will induce further deterioration if a coordinated management scheme is not adopted by decision-makers. To ensure effective coordinated management, plans should be made on a regional scale using shared guidelines. Spatial analysis procedures aid in prioritizing and adapting the shared guidelines depending on the identified major stressors and the preservation state of each region in the Mexican Caribbean. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Coastal Environment and Marine Science)
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