Hydrodynamics and Water Environment Characteristics in Coastal Areas

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 971

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department (DICEAA), Environmental and Maritime Hydraulic Laboratory (LIam), University of L’Aquila, Monteluco di Roio, L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: coastal engineering; ocean engineering; environmental engineering; water waves hydraulics; physical modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil, Construction-Architectural, and Environmental Engineering Department (DICEAA); Environmental and Maritime Hydraulic Laboratory (LIAM); University of L'Aquila; P.le Pontieri, 1 67100 Monteluco di Roio, L'Aquila, Italy
Interests: coastal engineering; coastal structures; ocean engineering; physical modeling; numerical modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The diversity of physical processes that characterize a coastal area make it a dynamic and complex environment. In these areas, complex physical processes related to the interactions between the sea, the coastline, and river mouths materialize. In addition to natural phenomena, the anthropogenic effects are often to be considered. Indeed, in a period of increasing anthropogenic pressure, these coastal environment's high social, economic, and ecological values may be threatened.

In this context, this Special Issue intends to collect original works and reviews that aim to contribute to the state of the art of the sustainable management of coastal areas. Studies from different scientific areas are encouraged.

Possible topics of interest are as follows:

  • Numerical tools for coastal management;
  • Marine and coastal ecosystem services;
  • Quality of bathing waters;
  • Hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of coastal areas;
  • Climate change adaptation strategies;
  • Coastal defense systems;
  • Coastal infrastructures;
  • Coastal pollution;
  • Coastal biodiversity;
  • Coastal sediment transport;
  • Coastal monitoring.

Prof. Dr. Marcello Di Risio
Dr. Daniele Celli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • near-shore hydrodynamics
  • water quality
  • coastal structures
  • coastal ecosystem
  • sediment transport
  • adaptation to climate change
  • coastal management

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 6918 KiB  
Article
A Wetting and Drying Approach for a Mode-Nonsplit Discontinuous Galerkin Hydrodynamic Model with Application to Laizhou Bay
by Zereng Chen, Qinghe Zhang, Guoquan Ran and Yang Nie
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(1), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12010147 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 773
Abstract
A wetting and drying treatment for a three-dimensional discontinuous Galerkin hydrodynamic model without mode splitting (external and internal modes) was developed. In this approach, computing elements are classified into wet, dry, and semidry elements, which are treated differently. In a Runge–Kutta time step, [...] Read more.
A wetting and drying treatment for a three-dimensional discontinuous Galerkin hydrodynamic model without mode splitting (external and internal modes) was developed. In this approach, computing elements are classified into wet, dry, and semidry elements, which are treated differently. In a Runge–Kutta time step, the reconstruction of the semidry elements and the combined utilization of two- and three-dimensional limiters help the model maintain stability. Numerical results show that the wetting and drying method can achieve a well-balanced property under the condition of still-water equilibrium and can reasonably describe the variation process of wetting and drying regions during a long wave run-up on a uniform slope and a tidal cycle in a basin with a variable slope. Analysis of the role of the limiters in the model indicated that the robustness of the three-dimensional hydrodynamic model can be effectively maintained when the two- and three-dimensional limiters are jointly applied for wetting and drying process simulation. A three-dimensional discontinuous Galerkin hydrodynamic model was applied with the presented wetting and drying method to simulate the tidal current evolution of a spring tidal cycle in southwestern Laizhou Bay in the Bohai Sea, in November 2003, and the simulated results of the water surface elevation and vertical layered current velocities agreed well with the measured data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrodynamics and Water Environment Characteristics in Coastal Areas)
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