Special Issue "New Insight on Sustainable Public Policy"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Jan Stenis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
LundaHydro AB, Borgholm, Sweden
Interests: public policy; public economy; resource economy; political philosophy
Prof. Dr. William Hogland
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linnaeus University, SE-391 82 Kalmar, Sweden
Interests: water and solid waste management; circular economy; recyling; landfilling/landfill mining; storage of waste fuels/recyclables; leachate treatment; waste management in developing countries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainability is important, not only for the world but also for the private sector and for public service as well. In these turbulent days, with pandemics, economic recession and climate change debates, the authorities are called upon to grant a decent life for inhabitants all over the world. This is a humanitarian need!

Nonetheless, what really matters about the social sector is not the absolute size of the national budget, but its ability to create a general feeling that common citizens have a good life and feel well. If such a mode can be accomplished, the risk for upheavals and strikes can be reduced. If so, the economy prospers.

In order to achieve this, it is necessary to plan and manage in a correct way public activity and resource efficiency in a territory, with the aim of guaranteeing the maximization of positive impacts which public action brings, and the minimization of negative impacts to eliminate most of the negative ones, also at the global level.

A Sustainable Public Policy for the social sector is a key aspect so as to achieve these objectives due to it guaranteeing, on the one hand, the perfect integration of citizens’ needs into the economy, society,  culture and the environment in those territories where a sustainable public policy develops. On the other hand, it also has a key role to properly satisfy the natural profitability demand, which is an essential point to ensure the viability of public projects in an increasingly harsh competition context.

In this sense, a New Insight on Sustainable Public Policy must ensure the coherence between the development tendencies and real possibilities of implementation of successful models. This is what allows people to design specific strategies and actions for each situation that raises the positive impacts.

Consequently, New Insights on Sustainable Public Policy allow us to identify, define and guide the stakeholders who influence societal development by promoting synergies that raise effort efficiency and effectiveness. Furthermore, this fosters the development of a holistic, comprehensive vision that promotes innovation to overcome the paradigms and barriers to societal development by suitable decision support tools.

The aim of this Special Issue is to demonstrate the importance of a sustainable policy and planning for public entities to ensure an efficient usage of resources. In doing so, the expectations and needs of the ever more demanding citizens can be met, concerned with experiencing quality for the services they are seeking.

Dr. Jan Stenis
Prof. Dr. William Hogland
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • public policy
  • public economy
  • resource efficiency
  • efficient organizations
  • economics
  • models
  • decision support tools
  • computerized decision making
  • quantitative methods
  • environment
  • water and waste management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
How to Improve Government Openness for Sustainable Development: The Interaction of Four Factors in African Countries
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 8000; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13148000 - 17 Jul 2021
Viewed by 449
Abstract
The objectives of this study are to: estimate African countries’ Government Openness Index (AGOI) to see the updated progress of open government in those countries, examine which areas African countries should further improve for sustainable development, and compare the performance of the Open [...] Read more.
The objectives of this study are to: estimate African countries’ Government Openness Index (AGOI) to see the updated progress of open government in those countries, examine which areas African countries should further improve for sustainable development, and compare the performance of the Open Government Partnership (OGP) member countries to that of non-OGP countries in forming AGOI. This study developed the AGOI with 32 selected countries and four factors (ACC (accountability), TRA (transparency), CPF (citizen participation and freedom) and ICT (information and communication technology)) for the period of 2006–2019. The results show that African countries have continuously increased the values of AGOI for the period. ACC has barely changed, but TRA has increased slightly. Both CPF and ICT have increased at higher growth rates during the period. The OGP group reached much better scores than their non-OGP counterparts, with positive differences in AGOI, ICT, CPF, and TRA, except ACC. The results of this study suggest that the constantly increasing CPF and ICT levels in countries that have similar conditions as African countries should be further improved to function well enough to build accountability and transparency. It is also recommended that countries join the OGP in order to move towards improving government openness and creating sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insight on Sustainable Public Policy)
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Article
The Idea of Justice in Innovation: Applying Non-Ideal Political Theory to Address Questions of Sustainable Public Policy in Emerging Technologies
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2655; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052655 - 02 Mar 2021
Viewed by 447
Abstract
Justice as such is not a new idea. Since the time of Plato and Aristotle, justice has been conceived as a moral and political standard of how people ought to conduct themselves and relate to one another in a fair society and institutions. [...] Read more.
Justice as such is not a new idea. Since the time of Plato and Aristotle, justice has been conceived as a moral and political standard of how people ought to conduct themselves and relate to one another in a fair society and institutions. However, even though principles of justice and related theories have been used to provide guidance to social and political actions, technological innovation remains an area of policy and practice in which justice cannot be easily applied. This is not only due to the complex process of generating new technologies and their unpredictable impact on social relations and institutions but also to perceptions of value neutrality in the innovation process. Such perceptions make public policy difficult to sustain. Nevertheless, innovation is a human action that is guided by both ethical norms and interests and is significant for justice. Emerging technologies create opportunities for promoting justice, but at the same time, they also pose risks to injustice. This paper is of theoretical nature and aims to explain why justice needs to provide the normative direction of innovation systems and related public policy in the 21st century. Through a critical review of the literature, the paper argues that justice as such is a non-ideal standard which is significant for the legitimacy of emerging technologies and related developmental change. The normative direction of innovation systems in the 21st century depends on non-ideal principles of equity, participation, and recognition. These principles embody sustainable public-policy solutions to problems of unequal generation and diffusion of emerging technologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insight on Sustainable Public Policy)
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Article
The GHG Emissions Generating Capacity by Productive Sectors in the EU: A SAM Analysis
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2363; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042363 - 22 Feb 2021
Viewed by 526
Abstract
In this paper, we evaluate the generating capacity of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions that all productive sectors have in the EU-27 of 2010. The analysis is performed using the social accounting matrices (SAMs) of each Member State (MS) and evaluating the interactions among [...] Read more.
In this paper, we evaluate the generating capacity of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions that all productive sectors have in the EU-27 of 2010. The analysis is performed using the social accounting matrices (SAMs) of each Member State (MS) and evaluating the interactions among industries, productive factors, and households with respect to the aggregated SAM for the EU-27. The main advantages and contributions of this study with respect to the existing literature are two. First, the availability of the whole income distribution detailed in the SAMs and second, their comparability across countries. The aim of this research is to better understand how productive sectors may damage the environment depending on their productive structure and final demand, particularly in a period of economic recession, which is very relevant in the context of COVID-19 and the near future. The results show that intersectoral connections are very diverse by MS and consequently, there are more differences in the generation capacity of GHG emission by country than by sector. Our results reinforce the idea of involving regional and national governments in the design and implementation of EU abatement strategies, taking into account the peculiarities of each region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insight on Sustainable Public Policy)
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