Next Article in Journal
Evaluation of the Melting Performance in a Conical Latent Heat Thermal Unit Having Variable Length Fins
Next Article in Special Issue
How to Improve Government Openness for Sustainable Development: The Interaction of Four Factors in African Countries
Previous Article in Journal
Developing a GIS-Based Decision Rule for Sustainable Marine Aquaculture Site Selection: An Application of the Ordered Weighted Average Procedure
Previous Article in Special Issue
The GHG Emissions Generating Capacity by Productive Sectors in the EU: A SAM Analysis
Article

The Idea of Justice in Innovation: Applying Non-Ideal Political Theory to Address Questions of Sustainable Public Policy in Emerging Technologies

Development Policy and Practice, The Open University, Chambers Building, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA, UK
Academic Editor: João Leitão
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2655; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052655
Received: 15 December 2020 / Revised: 9 February 2021 / Accepted: 21 February 2021 / Published: 2 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insight on Sustainable Public Policy)
Justice as such is not a new idea. Since the time of Plato and Aristotle, justice has been conceived as a moral and political standard of how people ought to conduct themselves and relate to one another in a fair society and institutions. However, even though principles of justice and related theories have been used to provide guidance to social and political actions, technological innovation remains an area of policy and practice in which justice cannot be easily applied. This is not only due to the complex process of generating new technologies and their unpredictable impact on social relations and institutions but also to perceptions of value neutrality in the innovation process. Such perceptions make public policy difficult to sustain. Nevertheless, innovation is a human action that is guided by both ethical norms and interests and is significant for justice. Emerging technologies create opportunities for promoting justice, but at the same time, they also pose risks to injustice. This paper is of theoretical nature and aims to explain why justice needs to provide the normative direction of innovation systems and related public policy in the 21st century. Through a critical review of the literature, the paper argues that justice as such is a non-ideal standard which is significant for the legitimacy of emerging technologies and related developmental change. The normative direction of innovation systems in the 21st century depends on non-ideal principles of equity, participation, and recognition. These principles embody sustainable public-policy solutions to problems of unequal generation and diffusion of emerging technologies. View Full-Text
Keywords: innovation; justice; fairness; emerging technologies; politics; policy innovation; justice; fairness; emerging technologies; politics; policy
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Papaioannou, T. The Idea of Justice in Innovation: Applying Non-Ideal Political Theory to Address Questions of Sustainable Public Policy in Emerging Technologies. Sustainability 2021, 13, 2655. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052655

AMA Style

Papaioannou T. The Idea of Justice in Innovation: Applying Non-Ideal Political Theory to Address Questions of Sustainable Public Policy in Emerging Technologies. Sustainability. 2021; 13(5):2655. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052655

Chicago/Turabian Style

Papaioannou, Theo. 2021. "The Idea of Justice in Innovation: Applying Non-Ideal Political Theory to Address Questions of Sustainable Public Policy in Emerging Technologies" Sustainability 13, no. 5: 2655. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052655

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop