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Special Issue "Inclusive Education and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Education and Approaches".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Suvi Lakkala
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, University of Lapland, 96101 Rovaniemi, Finland
Interests: research of inclusive education; pedagogy and practice; inter-professional work; educational transitions; teachers' professional development
Dr. Edda Óskarsdóttir
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, University of Iceland, 105 Reykjavík, Iceland; Project officer at European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education, 5000 Odense, Denmark
Interests: inclusive education pedagogy and practice; teacher education and professional development; cross-sectoral collaboration; school leadership; financing inclusive education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The purpose of the Special Issue on Inclusive Education and Sustainability is to focus on studies that enhance our understanding of the concept of inclusive education. There is a gap in the inclusive literature on conceptualizing the quality of inclusive education. Therefore, we are interested in papers that identify and analyze inclusive or exclusive perceptions, practices, pedagogies, and structures in different contexts and aim to change unequal power relations wherever people meet, work, and study. The perspectives may be taken at different levels of the education system, ranging from the micro level to societal structures as well as inclusive teacher education.

The approach in the articles addressed to the Special Issue may also be multidisciplinary and cross-sectoral, addressing how different disciplines and sectors can be brought together to develop inclusive education systems at the school, local, regional, or national levels.

Sustainable development is embedded in the ethos of inclusive education. Inclusive education resonates positively with widely agreed values of creating sustainable futures by emphasizing the value of each individual, embracing education for all, and promoting sustainable wellbeing in communities. In its broadest sense, inclusive education represents universal values of social justice and incorporates the idea of constantly evolving democracy. Our point of view is that researching inclusive education may support the building of resilient and tolerant communities in our current pluralistic world and enhance equality and equity in educational settings.

We welcome all types of research including quantitative and qualitative approaches, case studies, reviews, and multimethod research.

Dr. Suvi Lakkala
Dr. Edda Óskarsdóttir
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inclusive education
  • pedagogy and practice
  • inclusive teacher competence
  • equality and equity in education

Published Papers (18 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Enhancing Sustainable Inclusive Education
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 7798; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13147798 - 13 Jul 2021
Viewed by 495
Abstract
In recent decades, inclusive education has been the focal point of many international declarations related to children’s and young people’s educational rights [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)

Research

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Article
Combining Adapted Physical Education with Individualized Education Programs: Building Korean Pre-Service Teachers’ Self-Efficacy for Inclusive Physical Education
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2879; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052879 - 07 Mar 2021
Viewed by 652
Abstract
This study investigated the effect of combining adapted physical education courses with individualized education program training on pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy towards inclusive physical education. Multilevel modeling of a survey completed by two hundred and twenty-seven students enrolled in physical education teacher education programs [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effect of combining adapted physical education courses with individualized education program training on pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy towards inclusive physical education. Multilevel modeling of a survey completed by two hundred and twenty-seven students enrolled in physical education teacher education programs in Korea was analyzed using a quadratic growth curve model. The results revealed that a combined course did indeed have a significant effect on the pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy towards inclusive physical education compared with groups provided with either just an adapted physical education course or no course. The students receiving the combined course also exhibited a sustainable positive growth rate and an accelerated rate of improvement in their level of self-efficacy towards inclusive physical education. These findings clearly demonstrate that combining adapted physical education courses with individualized education program training can deliver a sustainable educational impact on Korean pre-service physical education teachers’ self-efficacy towards inclusive physical education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Teachers Supporting Students in Collaborative Ways—An Analysis of Collaborative Work Creating Supportive Learning Environments for Every Student in a School: Cases from Austria, Finland, Lithuania, and Poland
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2804; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052804 - 05 Mar 2021
Viewed by 765
Abstract
Many studies have highlighted the importance of community and cooperation in inclusive education. However, traditionally, teachers are trained to manage their classes alone. Along with the aspirations of inclusive education, there is high pressure to develop school cultures that are more communal and [...] Read more.
Many studies have highlighted the importance of community and cooperation in inclusive education. However, traditionally, teachers are trained to manage their classes alone. Along with the aspirations of inclusive education, there is high pressure to develop school cultures that are more communal and to reorient school personnel’s work, making it more collaborative, in order to meet the diverse needs of all students. In this research, we explored and compared the collaborative ways in which teachers supported their students in four schools in Austria, Finland, Lithuania, and Poland. As a conceptual framework, the research utilized theories of interprofessional teamwork. The researchers applied a theory-led thematic analysis to the research data. The main findings indicate that collaborative action needs to be an essential part of teachers’ work in an inclusive school. The schools and teachers implemented both proactive and reactive ways of constructing an inclusive pedagogy when they supported their students. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
Article
Inclusion, Dyslexia, Emotional State and Learning: Perceptions of Ibero-American Children with Dyslexia and Their Parents during the COVID-19 Lockdown
Sustainability 2021, 13(5), 2739; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052739 - 03 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1264
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed educational processes. This has had major consequences for students and, in particular, for those with special education needs. Dyslexic students suffer from widespread educational and legal invisibility, and information on their situation and that of their families during [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed educational processes. This has had major consequences for students and, in particular, for those with special education needs. Dyslexic students suffer from widespread educational and legal invisibility, and information on their situation and that of their families during this health crisis is lacking. This article presents the results of an exploratory study based on two online surveys taken by parents (n = 327) and children with dyslexia (n = 203) through the Spanish Dyslexia Federation (acronym in Spanish “FEDIS”), the Dyslexia and Family Association (acronym in Spanish “DISFAM”), and the Ibero-American Organisation for Specific Learning Difficulties (acronym in Spanish “OIDEA”). Data were collected in May–July 2020. The results offer a comprehensive viewpoint (family and children) on the aspects that have helped and hindered learning, such as teacher and family support, emotional state, use of ICT, and the importance of the voluntary/association network. The study provides evidence of how lockdown and school closures have created additional difficulties for learning but also how certain educational processes have been bolstered with the support of technological resources that should serve as benchmarks for education policy and classroom practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
Article
Chilean Teachers’ Attitudes towards Inclusive Education, Intention, and Self-Efficacy to Implement Inclusive Practices
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2300; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042300 - 20 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 972
Abstract
Teachers play an important role in the success of inclusive practices for diverse learners in regular classrooms. It is, therefore, important to examine their beliefs and preparation to teach in inclusive classrooms. The main purpose of this study was to analyze the attitude [...] Read more.
Teachers play an important role in the success of inclusive practices for diverse learners in regular classrooms. It is, therefore, important to examine their beliefs and preparation to teach in inclusive classrooms. The main purpose of this study was to analyze the attitude of active Chilean teachers (n = 569) towards inclusion, their self-efficacy regarding inclusive practices, and their intention to teach in inclusive classrooms. Our secondary objectives were to explore the relationship between their attitudes and self-efficacy and to determine the influence of demographic and professional variables on these two constructs. A positive and significant relationship between teachers’ attitude and self-efficacy was found. Teacher qualification was not significantly related to attitudes towards inclusion but was negatively associated with their self-efficacy beliefs concerning inclusive practices. Secondary education teachers reported lower teaching efficacy beliefs for inclusion than pre-school, primary, and special education teachers. The type of school emerged as a significant predictor of teachers’ attitude and self-efficacy beliefs. The implications of this research and need for additional teacher and in-service training to improve educators’ attitudes and self-efficacy are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
Article
Conceptualising Teacher Education for Inclusion: Lessons for the Professional Learning of Educators from Transnational and Cross-Sector Perspectives
Sustainability 2021, 13(4), 2167; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13042167 - 18 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1477
Abstract
Despite policy calling for enhanced inclusive practice within all schools and colleges, educators across Europe are facing increasing challenges when providing effective inclusive education for all students as a result of increased diversity within European society. This paper focuses on the development of [...] Read more.
Despite policy calling for enhanced inclusive practice within all schools and colleges, educators across Europe are facing increasing challenges when providing effective inclusive education for all students as a result of increased diversity within European society. This paper focuses on the development of our understanding of how to support educators’ professional learning around issues of diversity and inclusion. Specifically, it aims to explore what diversity looks like across countries, sectors, and roles, what challenges and dilemmas are posed for educators, and how new approaches to professional learning can support the educators across all sectors. The exploratory study described in the paper emerged from work undertaken as part of an Erasmus+ Strategic Partnership project called PROMISE (Promoting Inclusion in Society through Inclusion: Professional Dilemmas in Practice). Traditional approaches to professional learning to support teachers’ inclusive practice have tended to focus on discrete courses which address specific learning needs such as autism, literacy difficulties, or behavioural issues. The paper presents findings from a transnational study which indicate that the professional dilemmas facing educators are complex and unpredictable and argues, therefore, that educators require professional learning that is collaborative, interprofessional, and acknowledges that the challenges they face are multifaceted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
Article
A Comparison Study between Universal Design for Learning-Multiple Intelligence (UDL-MI) Oriented STEM Program and Traditional STEM Program for Inclusive Education
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 554; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020554 - 08 Jan 2021
Viewed by 1266
Abstract
The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) model and Multiple Intelligence (MI) theory hold considerable promise for advancing inclusive education. However, the effectiveness of UDL and MI in supporting inclusive science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has never been tested empirically. This study [...] Read more.
The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) model and Multiple Intelligence (MI) theory hold considerable promise for advancing inclusive education. However, the effectiveness of UDL and MI in supporting inclusive science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education has never been tested empirically. This study examined the impact of the UDL-MI-oriented STEM program on eighth-grade rural students’ attitudes towards STEM through mixed research design. A total of 122 students were selected through purposive sampling and randomly distributed into experimental (N = 62) and control groups (N = 60). The experimental group experienced STEM learning through the UDL-MI-oriented program and the control group received traditional classroom teaching. Both groups studied learning units on environmental sustainability and conservation for 10 weeks. Changes in students’ attitudes towards STEM were assessed over the time period (pre-test, post-test, follow-up) using an adapted Mahoney Student Attitude toward STEM instrument and individual interviews (post-test, follow-up). The results indicated that in comparison to the traditional classroom, the UDL-MI-oriented program significantly improved and maintained the students’ attitudes towards STEM. Next, the qualitative findings were presented to support the statistical analyses. This study provides empirical evidence for adopting the UDL-MI-oriented STEM program as an effective way of providing inclusive STEM education to rural students by enhancing their attitudes towards STEM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Questionnaire for Adolescents to Evaluate Their Attitudes towards Disability
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9007; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219007 - 29 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 652
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to create and validate a brief instrument to evaluate attitudes towards persons with disabilities among the adolescent population between 12 and 16 years of age. Disability is currently understood from a contextual perspective (ecological model of disability), [...] Read more.
The purpose of this article is to create and validate a brief instrument to evaluate attitudes towards persons with disabilities among the adolescent population between 12 and 16 years of age. Disability is currently understood from a contextual perspective (ecological model of disability), as the interaction of a person with her/his surroundings. As part of this interaction, the negative attitudes and expectations towards those with disabilities is still a reason for analysis, as it constitutes one of the main barriers to their inclusion in society. The evaluation of these attitudes in different age groups, using new analytical tools and instruments, is essential for the subsequent design and implementation of intervention measures in order to reverse the said attitudes and improve the collective’s place in society. In this study, there were 1282 participants, students between 12 and 16 years of age. A random selection was carried out, choosing fourteen educational centers in order to analyze the students’ attitudes towards persons with disabilities. The final result was the creation of the CBAD-12A questionnaire, made up of 12 Likert-type items, grouped into three factors: acceptance/rejection, competence/limitation, and equal opportunities. It has been demonstrated that the questionnaire possesses adequate psychometric characteristics, providing research with a new instrument to measure attitudes towards disability. The said questionnaire is useful as a diagnostic and/or predictive measure, allowing us to discover and generate interventions aimed at improving the attitudes of the adolescent population towards those with a disability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
Article
Augmented Reality as a Sustainable Technology to Improve Academic Achievement in Students with and without Special Educational Needs
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 8116; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12198116 - 01 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1481
Abstract
Virtual reality has impacted education, where progressively more educational institutions
consider its inclusion. The research problem derives from the need to study the educational possibilities
provided by integrating augmented reality into the curriculum, and its effect on academic achievement in
a diverse class, [...] Read more.
Virtual reality has impacted education, where progressively more educational institutions
consider its inclusion. The research problem derives from the need to study the educational possibilities
provided by integrating augmented reality into the curriculum, and its effect on academic achievement in
a diverse class, specifically in the chemistry subject. This study examines 60 school-age participants with
andwithout special educational needs, and addresses three overarching questions: (a)Would integrating
augmented reality (AR) technology result in better academic achievement? (b)Would knowledge be
retained longer by using AR? (c) Is there any relationship between academic achievement, acceptance
and motivation regarding the use of this technology? Embracing the socio-constructivist theory of
learning and collaborative and immersive learning as a framework, this study was carried out using
a quantitative approach and a pre-experimental design. The AR VR Molecules Editor application
was used in chemistry lessons. Main results showed significant immediate academic achievement
and content retention. Despite classroom diversity, immersive technologies enhance students’ learning
regardless of whether they have special educational needs (SEN) or not. They also acknowledge that AR
is a suitable sustainable technology that may foster social and cognitive justice and inclusive education,
and train students that are equally prepared for the dynamic future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Does the School Really Support My Child? SOFIA: An Assessment Tool for Families of Children with SEN in Spain
Sustainability 2020, 12(19), 7879; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12197879 - 23 Sep 2020
Viewed by 667
Abstract
The integration of the family in educating their children allows for the optimization of educational intervention. Despite its relevance, there is not much research aimed at collecting the voice of the families of students with Special Educational Needs (SEN) about their relationship with [...] Read more.
The integration of the family in educating their children allows for the optimization of educational intervention. Despite its relevance, there is not much research aimed at collecting the voice of the families of students with Special Educational Needs (SEN) about their relationship with the school system. The present study aims to develop and validate a questionnaire of the family perception of the support received from the educational system, the Satisfaction of Family in Inclusive Education Assessment (SOFIA) Questionnaire, conformed of 26 indicators. Analyses of the psychometric properties of the instrument support that they are good for use in this area. Specifically, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses support the internal structure of the instrument (confirmatory factorial analysis (CFA) = SBχ2 = 607.11, p < 0.001; χ2/df = 2.07; Comparative Adjustment Index (IFC) = 0.902; Incremental Adjustment Index (IFI) = 0.903; the root mean square error approximation (RMSEA) = 0.071) in the same way, all dimension showed adequate reliability (Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.91 to 0.94; CR ranged from 0.91 to 0.95). The Average Variance Extracted (AVE) results also showed adequate results (0.55 to 0.68). Our research results indicate that the SOFIA Questionnaire’s psychometric properties are adequate for the Spanish context. The SOFIA Questionnaire is presented as a valid and reliable instrument to collect the families’ perception of the support they receive from the educational system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
Article
Lessons Learned from Teaching Nursing Students about Equality, Equity, Human Rights, and Forced Migration through Roleplay in an Inclusive Classroom
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 7008; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12177008 - 27 Aug 2020
Viewed by 1026
Abstract
Inclusive education, sustainable development, and core nursing values all share common goals of promoting diversity, equity, social justice, and inclusion. However, prevailing norms of exclusion may shape health systems and healthcare workers’ attitudes and threaten inclusive patient care. Ongoing global conflicts and violence [...] Read more.
Inclusive education, sustainable development, and core nursing values all share common goals of promoting diversity, equity, social justice, and inclusion. However, prevailing norms of exclusion may shape health systems and healthcare workers’ attitudes and threaten inclusive patient care. Ongoing global conflicts and violence resulting in growing patient diversity in terms of ethnicity and migration status have led to questions regarding healthcare systems’ preparedness for inclusive nursing. Diversity-rich classrooms and collaborative learning methods, like role play, are inclusive strategies that may be useful in nursing education. The purpose of this paper is to present lessons learned from incorporating role play about forced migration in inclusive nursing classrooms. Various diversity-rich nursing student groups participated in a two-hour role play on forced migration facilitated by youth volunteers from the Swedish Red Cross Society between 2017 and 2019. This study is based on the amplified analysis of qualitative data materials, in the form of notes and summarized feedbacks, obtained from evaluating the role play as a teaching-learning activity. Three themes were identified, specifically, knowledge exchange, existential reflections, and empathy evoked. Findings suggest that working collaboratively in an inclusive environment may improve nursing students’ understanding of the vulnerabilities created by forced migration and to be better prepared for promoting social justice for this group in health care settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
Article
Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Social Skills Scale for Young Immigrants
Sustainability 2020, 12(17), 6897; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12176897 - 25 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 788
Abstract
The integration of young immigrants in the societies that host them highlights the need for the intervention of social workers to facilitate their adaptation and inclusion from an individualized diagnosis of their needs. The development of social skills in the immigrants is one [...] Read more.
The integration of young immigrants in the societies that host them highlights the need for the intervention of social workers to facilitate their adaptation and inclusion from an individualized diagnosis of their needs. The development of social skills in the immigrants is one of the main ways to make that integration happen, and therefore its diagnosis is fundamental. However, at present, there are no valid and reliable instruments that take into account the sociocultural factors that surround young immigrants for the evaluation of their social skills. It is for this reason that the purpose of this study was to adapt and validate a current and useful instrument for the diagnosis of such social skills to young immigrants welcomed in Spain. To do this, it was started on the choice and adaptation of The Social Skills Scale (Escala de Habilidades Sociales). Subsequently, the questionnaire was submitted to concurrent, predictive, and nomological validation processes. The construct validity was carried out by factor analysis first and second order to confirm the hierarchical structure of the scale. After validation with Exploratory Factor Analysis (n = 330), the structure was checked, and the model was later adjusted with Confirmatory Factor Analysis (n = 568) by means of structural equations. The reliability and internal consistency of the instrument was also tested with values in all dimensions above 0.8. It is concluded that this new instrument has 29 items and 6 dimensions, has acceptable validity and reliability, and can be used for the diagnosis of Social Skills in Young Immigrants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
SolarSPELL Assessment: Impact of a Solar-Powered Digital Library as a Teaching-Learning Resource on Climate Change
Sustainability 2020, 12(16), 6636; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12166636 - 17 Aug 2020
Viewed by 940
Abstract
Inclusive and quality education can provide nations with the tools to solve global problems. However, some barriers prevent equal access to this education. These obstacles include the lack of basic resources such as electricity and internet availability, which prevents appropriate training in the [...] Read more.
Inclusive and quality education can provide nations with the tools to solve global problems. However, some barriers prevent equal access to this education. These obstacles include the lack of basic resources such as electricity and internet availability, which prevents appropriate training in the skills necessary for sustainable community development. Therefore, we have responded with the Solar-Powered Educational Learning Library (SolarSPELL) initiative, which offers a solar-powered digital library and provides an internet-like experience through its offline WiFi network. This educational innovation has been implemented in rural schools across the Pacific Islands, including in some of the more remote islands of Fiji, an area strongly affected by climate change. The objective of the study was to understand the impact of SolarSPELL on teaching and learning about climate change in the schools where it was implemented. This research used a case study method in which quantitative tools were applied to understand the characteristics of the schools and the impact of this educational innovation. The results showed that the SolarSPELL library was an impactful pedagogical resource in the schools where it was implemented. It served as support for teachers and motivated the students, promoted the democratization of knowledge in vulnerable areas, and provided appropriate educational resources to generate knowledge about problem-solving actions that can respond to climate change. The importance of this educational innovation lies in presenting strategies and best practices that help improve the quality of education, making it more inclusive and eliminating barriers to the acquisition of knowledge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Initial Teacher Education for Inclusive Education: A Bibliometric Analysis of Educational Research
Sustainability 2020, 12(12), 4923; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12124923 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2014
Abstract
In the context of international demands in recent decades to strengthen the commitment to inclusive policy and practices within education systems, teacher education has been challenged to find ways to prepare teachers capable of addressing the various needs of learners. The goal of [...] Read more.
In the context of international demands in recent decades to strengthen the commitment to inclusive policy and practices within education systems, teacher education has been challenged to find ways to prepare teachers capable of addressing the various needs of learners. The goal of this paper is to examine the research literature on initial teacher education for inclusive education (ITEIE) by using bibliometric analysis carried out on 440 documents indexed by Web of Science (WoS). The findings support the understanding of the ITEIE field regarding the evolution across time, the contributions in the field, the relevant journals, authors, and papers, the collaboration patterns. Although there has been a significant increase in the number of published works over the years, only a small number of countries and researchers have made significant contributions to the field. The analyses performed with VOSviewer software indicated poor collaboration among participating countries and authors. Several general topics have been addressed in the field over the past 25 years. There is a need to develop more cross-border research groups to ensure progress in the field. By mapping the emerging ITEIE research literature, this study can be a starting point for the development of new studies in the area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Equal Opportunities in an Inclusive and Sustainable Education System: An Explanatory Model
Sustainability 2020, 12(11), 4626; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12114626 - 05 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1255
Abstract
Equal opportunities is an objective to be achieved in a sustainable society, as formulated by various sustainable development objectives. Inclusive education refers to the right of all people to education, guaranteeing the presence, participation, and progress of all students and, above all, equal [...] Read more.
Equal opportunities is an objective to be achieved in a sustainable society, as formulated by various sustainable development objectives. Inclusive education refers to the right of all people to education, guaranteeing the presence, participation, and progress of all students and, above all, equal opportunities. However, today, it is a dual and controversial issue, as it appears among the strategies and objectives planned at international and European levels, but its application and real development is still far from being a right with guarantees. Moreover, the concept of integration remains in most areas and many education policies. Therefore, the objective of this work is to establish which integration and inclusion measures favor equal opportunities. The study offers, as a major novelty, the results of empirical research, which provides a scientific framework to this process of equal opportunities. It is approached from the perspective of teaching staff with a sample of 133 professionals. The results are analyzed through factorial analysis and multiple linear regression. The results show that the aspects related to inclusion (measures of attention to diversity, high knowledge about inclusion, and adapting the system to inclusion) have a significant positive effect. The integration of students reduces equal opportunities in a statistically significant way. The results are of interest for educational policies and for decision-making and strategies to achieve sustainability and inclusion in the school environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Self-Efficacy of Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers Toward Inclusion in Saudi Arabia
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3898; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093898 - 10 May 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1154
Abstract
This study aims to determine the differences in levels of self-efficacy toward inclusion in general physical education (PE) classes among Saudi pre-service PE teachers. It also aims to evaluate the effect of independent variables with the covariate of attitude scores on participants’ self-efficacy [...] Read more.
This study aims to determine the differences in levels of self-efficacy toward inclusion in general physical education (PE) classes among Saudi pre-service PE teachers. It also aims to evaluate the effect of independent variables with the covariate of attitude scores on participants’ self-efficacy toward including students with intellectual disabilities (ID), physical disabilities (PD), and visual impairments (VI). In total, 260 pre-service PE teachers enrolled in a university in Saudi Arabia completed the Arabic version of the self-efficacy scale for a physical education teacher education major toward children with disabilities. Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed that self-efficacy was highest towards including students with intellectual disability in general PE class and lowest towards students with physical disabilities. Having previous experience of observing a PE teacher teaching a student with a disability significantly influenced participants’ self-efficacy. Participants’ attitudes toward inclusion were only significant with participants’ self-efficacy toward students with physical disabilities. The findings suggest that observing a role model significantly predicts self-efficacy toward the inclusion of students with a disability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Engagement SPIRALS in Elementary Students: A School-Based Self-Regulated Learning Approach
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3894; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093894 - 10 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1234
Abstract
SPIRALS program was designed in accordance with the inclusive Universal Design for Learning approach and the social cognitive model of self-regulated learning. This project aims to promote cognitive, emotional, and behavioral engagement among elementary students, and especially those at high risk of dropping [...] Read more.
SPIRALS program was designed in accordance with the inclusive Universal Design for Learning approach and the social cognitive model of self-regulated learning. This project aims to promote cognitive, emotional, and behavioral engagement among elementary students, and especially those at high risk of dropping out (such as Roma students). To test the efficacy of the program, an intervention study was performed for four months within a truly inclusive learning environment, involving the whole classes. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design with a control group (n = 63) and an experimental group (n = 57) was used. The dependent variables were student engagement (cognitive, emotional, and behavioral), academic self-concept, perceived climate of support, reading comprehension, and academic performance. Students in the experimental group exhibited statistically significant improvements compared to the control group in six of the seven dependent variables analyzed (behavioral and emotional engagement, academic self-concept, perceived climate of support, reading comprehension, and academic performance). Further, the magnitude of differences tended to be larger in student engagement, perceived climate of support, and reading comprehension than in academic self-concept or academic performance. These results provide evidence supporting the usefulness of intervention programs aimed at promoting student engagement, specifically among students at higher risk of failure or dropout. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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Article
Validation of the Index for Inclusion Questionnaire for Compulsory Secondary Education Students
Sustainability 2020, 12(6), 2169; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12062169 - 11 Mar 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1290
Abstract
As one of the protagonists in education, the perspective of the students is fundamental in the determination of inclusive education in an educational center. The Index for Inclusion is an instrument and strategy for self-evaluation. One of their questionnaires, the questionnaire for compulsory [...] Read more.
As one of the protagonists in education, the perspective of the students is fundamental in the determination of inclusive education in an educational center. The Index for Inclusion is an instrument and strategy for self-evaluation. One of their questionnaires, the questionnaire for compulsory secondary education students, is intended for students and has become one of the most used instruments to help teaching teams to self-assess their political and practical cultures from the perspective of the values and principles of educational inclusion worldwide. Some of the questionnaires included in the Index have been used in many studies, mainly in a qualitative way. For this reason, the present study intends to show evidence of validity of the Index for Inclusion questionnaire of students in a quantitative way through an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). In this study, 727 secondary school students (359 boys and 368 girls) aged between 13 and 19 years (M = 13.89; SD = 1.35) took part. They belonged to six educational centers in the province of Almeria. To analyze the temporal stability of the Index for Inclusion student questionnaire, a second independent sample of 81 secondary school students was used, aged between 15 and 18 years (M= 16.14; SD = 0.78). The results revealed adequate adjustment rates, showing the invariant structure with respect to gender. The Student Inclusion Index was shown to be a robust and adequate psychometric instrument to assess the degree of development of inclusive education in schools from the perspective of secondary school students, and therefore, its future application to students in schools is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Inclusive Education and Sustainability)
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