Special Issue "Hydrometeorological Hazards and Disasters"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Hatim Sharif
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
Interests: hydrometeorology; hydrologic modeling and forecasting; environmental applications of remote sensing; natural hazards; public health; water quality modeling; transportation safety
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Extreme hydrometeorological events that occur naturally threaten and cause harm to lives and livelihoods and result in billions of dollars of damage worldwide every year. Their environmental impacts are equally catastrophic. Human activities may help prevent hydrometeorological hazards from turning into disasters but, in many situations, they may also exacerbate their impacts, e.g., through excessive development in coastal areas that increases risk exposure and community vulnerability. Moreover, climate change may be responsible for the increasing frequency and magnitude of atmospheric patterns that lead to more frequent and intense hydrometeorological disasters (e.g., severe storms, floods, wildfires, and droughts).

This Special Issue of Sustainability solicits papers that present new concepts, methods, and case studies in the prediction, characterization, monitoring, mapping, communication, risk management, and mitigation of hydrometeorological hazards and disasters. All types of hazards and disasters associated with atmosphere, land, and ocean, and those induced by climate change and variability will be considered. The topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the environmental, economic, and health aspects of hydrometeorological hazards and disasters, quantitative and qualitative hazard and risk assessment, multi-hazard risk assessment, multi-vulnerability risk assessment, multi-hazard early warning systems, advances in hazard and disaster visualization, applications of new technologies in hazard and disaster communication, uncertainties associated with hazard and risk assessment, and the spatial and temporal scale effects on hazard and risk assessment.

Prof. Dr. Hatim Sharif
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural hazards and disasters
  • Hazard assessment
  • Hurricanes
  • Severe storms
  • Floods
  • Risk analysis
  • Early-warning systems
  • Hazard and risk communication
  • Risk management
  • Climate change impacts

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Spatial and Temporal Variations in Extreme Precipitation and Temperature Events in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei Region of China over the Past Six Decades
Sustainability 2020, 12(4), 1415; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12041415 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
Extreme weather events can cause a lot of damage in highly populated regions, such as in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei Region (BTHR) in northern China. To understand where and how extreme precipitation and temperature events are changing within the BTHR, data for 1959–2018 from 25 [...] Read more.
Extreme weather events can cause a lot of damage in highly populated regions, such as in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei Region (BTHR) in northern China. To understand where and how extreme precipitation and temperature events are changing within the BTHR, data for 1959–2018 from 25 mereological stations were used to detect trends in the intensity, frequency, and duration of these events. The results showed that intensity, accumulated amount, the duration of extreme precipitation events, and the annual number of days with precipitation greater than 50 mm decreased on a regional scale over this 60-year period. Changes in extreme precipitation events at most stations were not statistically significant, although a few stations had a significant downward trend. The combined effects of the East Asian summer monsoon and rapid urbanization are possible reasons for these trends. Both the annual maximum and minimum temperature increased on a regional and local scale. The frequency of extreme hot and cold weather also, respectively, increased and decreased, with consistent patterns on a regional and local scale. However, the spatial changes of these trends were different, reflecting the effects of irrigation and urbanization on the regional surface energy balance. These findings are valuable to decisionmakers involved in disaster prevention in the BTHR and in other highly populated regions worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrometeorological Hazards and Disasters)
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Open AccessArticle
Coastal Runoff in the United Arab Emirates—The Hazard and Opportunity
Sustainability 2019, 11(19), 5406; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11195406 - 29 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Properly quantifying the potential exposure of hyper-arid regions to climate extremes is fundamental to developing frameworks that can be used to manage these extremes. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), rapid growth may exacerbate the impacts of climate extremes through urbanization (increased runoff), [...] Read more.
Properly quantifying the potential exposure of hyper-arid regions to climate extremes is fundamental to developing frameworks that can be used to manage these extremes. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), rapid growth may exacerbate the impacts of climate extremes through urbanization (increased runoff), population and industrial development (more water demand). Water resources management approaches such as Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) application may help mitigate both extremes by storing more water from wet periods for use during droughts. In this study, we quantified the volumes of runoff from coastal watersheds discharging to the Gulf of Oman and the Arabian Gulf that could potentially be captured to replenish depleted aquifers along the coast and help reduce the adverse impacts of urban flooding. To this aim, we first downloaded and processed the Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (IMERG) rainfall data for a recent wide-spread storm event. The rainfall product was then used as input to hydrologic models of coastal watersheds for estimating the resulting runoff. A multi-criteria decision analysis technique was used to identify areas most prone to runoff accumulation. Lastly, we quantified the volumes of runoff that could potentially be captured from frequency storms of different return periods and how rapid urbanization in the region may increase these runoff volumes creating more opportunities for the replenishment of depleted aquifers. Our results indicate that the average runoff from watersheds discharging to the ocean ranges between 0.11 km3 and 0.48 km3 for the 5-year and 100-year storms, respectively. We also found that these amounts will substantially increase due to rapid urbanization in the coastal regions of the UAE. In addition to water supply augmentation during droughts, potential benefits of application of MAR techniques in the UAE coastal regions may include flood control, mitigation against sea-level rise through subsidence control, reduction of aquifer salinity, rehabilitation of ecosystems, cleansing polluted runoff and preventing excessive runoff into the Gulf that can contribute to red tide events. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrometeorological Hazards and Disasters)
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of River Channel Occupation on Urban Inundation and Sedimentation Induced by Floodwater in Mountainous Areas: A Case Study in the Loess Plateau, China
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 761; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030761 - 01 Feb 2019
Abstract
River channel occupation has made cities in the mountainous areas more vulnerable to floodwater out of river channels during rapid global urbanization. A better understanding of the influence of river channel occupation on urban flood disasters can serve as a reference in planning [...] Read more.
River channel occupation has made cities in the mountainous areas more vulnerable to floodwater out of river channels during rapid global urbanization. A better understanding of the influence of river channel occupation on urban flood disasters can serve as a reference in planning effective urban flood control strategies. In this study, taking a flood event that occurred on July 26th, 2017 in a city on the Loess Plateau as an example, field surveys, dynamics detection of the river channel using remote sensing technology, and scenario simulations with a two-dimensional flow and sediment model were utilized to quantitatively analyze the impacts of river channel occupation on urban inundation and sedimentation. The results show that river channel dynamics reduced by construction can be successfully detected using the combination of high-resolution images and Landsat time-series images. The variation of the water level–discharge relationship caused by the narrowing of the river channel and the increase of the flood-water level caused by water-blocking bridges/houses result in a significant reduction of the flood discharge capacity. The contribution of the narrowing of the river channel was 72.3% for the total area inundated by floodwater, whereas 57.2% of urban sedimentation was caused by the construction of bridges/houses within the river channel. Sustainable flood mitigation measures were also recommended according to the investigations and research findings in this study in order to reduce the social, environmental and economic damages caused by floods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrometeorological Hazards and Disasters)
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