Special Issue "Sustainable High Volume Road and Rail Transport in Low Income Countries"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Transportation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Michael Burrow Website E-Mail
School of Civil Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
Interests: road and rail asset management with a focus on developing countries
Guest Editor
Dr. Gurmel Ghataora Website E-Mail
School of Civil Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK
Interests: road and rail geotechnical engineering, use of marginal materials
Guest Editor
Mr. Bruce Thompson E-Mail
Independent Consultant, formerly Head of Infrastructure Policy, Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development, European Commission
Interests: transport infrastructure policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue addresses the sustainable provision of high volume transport in developing countries. It is recognised that transportation is vital for economic and social development.  However to realise these goals, transportation must be safe, affordable, reliable and accessible to all in society. Transportation also needs to be sustainable without incurring excessive greenhouse gas consequences and environmental impacts. This issue of Sustainability explores these ideals in the developing country context. Contributions are invited which address high volume transport infrastructure and its sustainable management, low carbon transport and inclusivity in high volume transport provision. Theoretical, empirical and review studies are welcome from the researchers and practitioners alike.

Dr. Michael Burrow
Dr. Gurmel Ghataora
Mr. Bruce Thompson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • High volume transport
  • Sustainable long distance strategic road and rail
  • Road and rail transport services
  • Road infrastructure
  • Rail infrastructure
  • Urban transport
  • High volume corridors and networks
  • Low carbon transport
  • Gender, vulnerable groups and inclusion in high volume transport

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Addressing the Linkages between Gender and Transport in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Sustainability 2019, 11(17), 4555; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11174555 - 22 Aug 2019
Abstract
The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) specifies gender equality and sustainable development as their two central priorities. An area of critical importance for sustainable and gender-fair development is mobility and transport, which has so far been neglected and downplayed in research and policy making [...] Read more.
The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) specifies gender equality and sustainable development as their two central priorities. An area of critical importance for sustainable and gender-fair development is mobility and transport, which has so far been neglected and downplayed in research and policy making both at the national and global levels. Rooted in the history of the topic and the emerging ideas on smart, green and integrated transport, this paper presents a literature review of on gender and transport in the low- and middle-income countries. The paper presents a host of cross-cutting topics with a concentrated focus on spatial and transport planning. The paper further identifies existing research gaps and comments on the new conceptualizations on smart cities and smart mobilities in the Global South. Due attention is paid to intersections and synergies that can be created between different development sectors, emerging transport modes, data and modeling exercises, gender equality and sustainability. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Low-Carbon Quick Wins: Integrating Short-Term Sustainable Transport Options in Climate Policy in Low-Income Countries
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4369; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164369 - 12 Aug 2019
Abstract
In low income countries (LICs) in Africa and Asia per capita transport greenhouse gas emissions are relatively low but are expected to grow. Therefore, a substantial reduction in projected increases is required to bring emissions in line with long-term global climate objectives. Literature [...] Read more.
In low income countries (LICs) in Africa and Asia per capita transport greenhouse gas emissions are relatively low but are expected to grow. Therefore, a substantial reduction in projected increases is required to bring emissions in line with long-term global climate objectives. Literature on how LICs are integrating climate change mitigation and sustainable transport strategies is limited. Key drivers of transport policy include improving accessibility, congestion, air quality, energy security, with reducing greenhouse gas emissions being of lower priority. This paper assesses the current status, feasibility and potential of selected low-carbon transport measures with high sustainable development benefits that can be implemented in the short to medium term, so- called ‘quick wins’. It examines to what extent ten such quick wins are integrated in climate change strategies in nine low- and middle-income countries in Africa and South Asia. The research method comprises expert interviews, an online questionnaire survey of experts and policymakers in the focus countries, and a review of literature and government plans. Results indicate that sustainable urban transport policies and measures are considered high priority, with vehicle-related measures such as fuel quality and fuel economy standards and electric two- and three-wheelers being of key relevance. In existing national climate change strategies, these quick wins are integrated to a certain extent; however, with better coordination between transport and energy and environment agencies such strategies can be improved. A general conclusion of this paper is that for LICs, quick wins can connect a ‘top-down’ climate perspective with a ‘bottom-up’ transport sector perspective. A knowledge gap exists as to the mitigation potential and sustainable development benefits of these quick wins in the local context of LICs. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Developing a New Technical Strategy for Rail Infrastructure in Low-Income Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia
Sustainability 2019, 11(16), 4319; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11164319 - 09 Aug 2019
Abstract
Low-income countries (LICs) in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia are investing in new railway lines to replace deteriorated infrastructure from the 19th and 20th century. These actions, despite financial and economic constraints, have been justified in common visions of continent-wide efficient networks to [...] Read more.
Low-income countries (LICs) in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia are investing in new railway lines to replace deteriorated infrastructure from the 19th and 20th century. These actions, despite financial and economic constraints, have been justified in common visions of continent-wide efficient networks to cope with the demands of growing populations. However, most of the recent rail infrastructure projects are driven by international suppliers’ preferences and financing rather than creating railways that match the requirements of interoperable regional networks. This paper therefore explores the current status of rail infrastructure in these LICs and the operational performance achieved to understand specific capability gaps in each regional network. Drawing from the experience of European countries in transforming regional future visions into applied research, a technical strategy for rail infrastructure in LICs is proposed. The strategy captures the key capabilities to be addressed in order to achieve future performance goals, while emphasizing the need for emerging technologies to be used in fit-for-purpose solutions. It is envisioned that the strategy will provide the basis for the development of continental technical strategy programs with specific technology roadmaps towards a common goal. Full article
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