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Special Issue "Food Additives and Sustainability"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Wildlife".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Márcio Carocho

Centro de Investigação de Montanha (CIMO), Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, 5300-253, Bragança, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: natural food additives, food coatings, chemistry of natural products, functional foods
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Isabel C.F.R. Ferreira

Centro de Investigação de Montanha CIMO, Instituto Politécnico de Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, P-5300253 Bragança, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food chemistry; natural products; functional foods
Guest Editor
Dr. Patricia Morales

Departamento de Nutrición y Ciencia de los Alimentos (Bromatología), Faculty of Pharmacy, Complutense University of Madrid, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: food science and technology, natural food matrix, food additives, functional foods and ingredients

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The advancement of science is essential to the food industry, and, likewise, this industry is pivotal to mankind, thus, sustainability in food science is the guarantee that food will be delivered worldwide in the finest conditions of hygiene and safety. Food additives play an essential role in this industry by conferring special traits to food, namely to preserve, colour, sweeten or carry out other technologic purposes. Today, the industry relies primarily on synthetic or artificial additives, and, in some cases natural molecules are allowed. These are either harvested from plants or mimicked from their natural counterparts. Inversely, consumer preferences tend to favor natural food additives, thus increasing their research, further pressurizing the industry and governing bodies to loosen legislation. Concomitantly, consumer awareness of pollution and environmental changes resulting from the food industry is increasing, to which the additive production industry contributes towards, either through the synthesis of toxic compounds, use of hazardous chemicals and solvents, treatment of resulting by-products and finally by use of non-renewable resources for their manufacture.

The transition to natural food additives has already started, namely with the introduction of rosemary extract as a preservative, but also the use of steviol glycosides as sweeteners and various natural pigments as colouring agents. This natural revolution has promoted the pursuit of new natural compounds and the increase of their production yields and stability. Still, this is only the dawn of natural food additives, and a long road lies ahead.

Accordingly, this special issue will accept research involving:

  • Sustainable production of crops, microorganisms and animals as raw material for food additive production
  • Chemical characterization of natural food additives
  • Sustainable/alternative processes of additive production
  • Analytical methods of food additive determination
  • Additive interaction with food matrices
  • Bio-based/functional food ingredients
  • Biochemical impacts of food additives in the human body
  • Toxicology and pharmacokinetics of food additives
  • Consumer studies
  • Food additive policy and legislation

Dr. Márcio Carocho
Dr. Isabel C.F.R. Ferreira
Dr. Patricia Morales
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural food additives
  • sustainable additives
  • food chemistry and technology
  • sustainable processes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Different Levels of Sodium Nitrite on the Safety, Oxidative Stability, and Color of Minced Roasted Beef
Sustainability 2019, 11(14), 3795; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11143795
Received: 30 May 2019 / Revised: 3 July 2019 / Accepted: 5 July 2019 / Published: 11 July 2019
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Abstract
This study focuses on collecting actual data on the workable possibility of reducing the technological use of nitrites in beef products according to the present trends in nutrition, especially in terms of European Union (EU) food law. Measurements of safety by technological (pH [...] Read more.
This study focuses on collecting actual data on the workable possibility of reducing the technological use of nitrites in beef products according to the present trends in nutrition, especially in terms of European Union (EU) food law. Measurements of safety by technological (pH value, water activity, N-nitrosamine), microbiological, oxidative stability (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, oxidation-reduction potential), and color parameter (CIE L*a*b*, total heme pigment and heme iron) methods were taken after production and storage. The roasted beef with a reduced inclusion level of sodium nitrite (75 mg/kg and below) was more vulnerable to lipid oxidation. The quantities of primary lipid oxidation products were related to the sodium nitrite inclusion level (50–150 mg/kg). Clostridium spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes were not detected in any of the samples tested during all the experiments. The total count of Enterobacteriaceae increased with the decrease in sodium nitrite content, from log 2.75 cfu/g at the highest to log 6.03 cfu/g at the smallest addition of nitrite. The obtained results revealed that the addition of 100 mg/kg of sodium nitrite would be adequate for minced roasted beef, without significant unexpected effects on color, oxidative stability, and microbiological safety compared with the control (150 mg/kg). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Additives and Sustainability)
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Open AccessArticle
Food Preservative Capabilities of Grape (Vitis vinifera) and Clementine Mandarin (Citrus reticulata) By-products Extracts in South Africa
Sustainability 2019, 11(6), 1746; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11061746
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 15 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 22 March 2019
PDF Full-text (559 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The drive towards sustainable food systems coupled with increased consumer sophistication have prompted innovation in waste valorization. Grape and citrus processing by-products, abundant in the Mediterranean and tropical regions, respectively, are expanding and are sustainable sources of bioactive phytochemicals that can be used [...] Read more.
The drive towards sustainable food systems coupled with increased consumer sophistication have prompted innovation in waste valorization. Grape and citrus processing by-products, abundant in the Mediterranean and tropical regions, respectively, are expanding and are sustainable sources of bioactive phytochemicals that can be used as natural preservatives for foods. Phytochemical composition, antioxidant, and antimicrobial properties of extracts from grape pomace (GPE), seeds (GSE), and clementine mandarin peel and pulp (MPE) grown in South Africa were analyzed. Total phenols and carotenoids were highest in GPE followed by GSE and MPE (p ≤ 0.05). Flavonoids and anthocyanins were higher (p ≤ 0.05) in GPE and GSE compared to MPE. The GSE had the highest proanthocyanidins content followed by GPE and MPE (p ≤ 0.05). Ascorbic acid was only detected in MPE, which also had the highest titratable acidity and lowest pH values (p ≤ 0.05). The GSE had the highest antioxidant potency composite index followed by GPE and MPE (p ≤ 0.05). The order of antimicrobial activity of the extracts was MPE > GSE > GPE (p ≤ 0.05). Current findings show that GSE is a potential antioxidant while MPE holds promise as an antimicrobial for the food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Additives and Sustainability)
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